UC Santa Barbara General CatalogUniversity of California, Santa Barbara

Mechanical Engineering

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Engineering II, Room 2355;
Telephone (805) 893-2430
Web site: www.me.ucsb.edu
Chair: Francesco Bullo
Vice Chair: Frederic Gibou


 

Some courses displayed may not be offered every year. For actual course offerings by quarter, please consult the Quarterly Class Search or GOLD (for current students). To see the historical record of when a particular course has been taught in the past, please visit the Course Enrollment Histories.

Mechanical Engineering
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Collapse Courses Lower Division 
ME 6. Basic Electrical and Electronic Circuits
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Physics 3-3L; Mathematics 3C or 4A; open to ME majors only.
Enrollment Comments: Quarters usually offered: Winter. Not open for credit to students who have completed ECE 2A or 2B, or ECE 6A or 6B.
Introduction to basic electrical circuits and electronics. Includes Kirchhoff's laws, phasor analysis, circuit elements, operational amplifiers and transistor circuits.
ME 10. Engineering Graphics: Sketching, CAD and Conceptual Design
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering majors only.
Introduction to engineering graphics, CAD, and freehand sketching. Develop CAD proficiency using advanced 3-D software. Graphical presentation of design: views, sections, dimensioning, and tolerancing.
ME 11. Introductory Concepts in Mechanical Engineering
(1) BOTHMAN, FIELDS, BELTZ
Prerequisite: Lower-division standing.
The theme question of this course is, "What do mechanical engineers do?" Survey of mechanical and environmental engineering applications. Lectures by mechanical engineering faculty and practicing engineers.
ME 12. Manufacturing Processes
(1) BOTHMAN
Prerequisite: ME majors only.
Processes used to convert raw material into finished objects. Overview of manufacturing processes including: casting, forging, machining, presswork, plastic and composite processing. Videos, demonstrations, and tours illustrate modern industrial practice. Selection of appropriate processes.
ME 12S. Introduction to Machine Shop
(1) STAFF
Prerequisite: Mechanical engineering majors only.
Enrollment Comments: Not open for credit to students who havecompleted Mechanical Engineering 156S.
Basic machine shop skills course. Students learn to work safely in a machine shop. Students are introduced to the use of hand tools, the lathe, the milling machine, drill press, saws, and precision measuring tools. Students apply these skills by completing a project.
ME 14. Statics
(4) BELTZ, SHUGAR, TURNER
Prerequisite: Math 3B, or AP Calculus AB with a score of 5, or AP Calculus BC with a score of 3 or better; and Physics 1
Introduction to applied mechanics. Forces, moments, couples, and resultants; vector algebra; construction of free body diagrams; equilibrium in 2- and 3- dimensions; analysis of frames, machines, trusses and beams; distributed forces; friction.
ME 15. Strength of Materials
(4) BELTZ, KEDWARD
Prerequisite: ME 14 with a minimum grade of C-; open to mechanical engineering majors only.
Enrollment Comments: Quarters usually offered: Fall.
Properties of structural materials, including Hooke’s law and behavior beyond the elastic limit. Concepts of stress, strain, displacement, force, force systems, and multiaxial stress states. Design applications to engineering structures, including problems of bars in tension, compression, and torsion, beams subject to flexure, pressure vessels, and buckling.
ME 16. Engineering Mechanics: Dynamics
(4) TURNER, MEZIC, BAMIEH
Prerequisite: Physics 2, ME 14 with a minimum grade of C-, Mathematics 5C or 6B (may be taken concurrently); open to ME majors only.
Vectorial kinematics of particles. Coordinate systems, moving frames, relative and constrained motion. Dynamics of particles and systems of particles. Energy and momentum methods. Collisions. Planar kinematics and kinematics of rigid bodies. Energy and momentum methods for rigid body systems.
ME 17. Mathematics of Engineering
(3) MOEHLIS, GIBOU
Prerequisite: Engineering 3; Mathematics 5B or 6A (may be taken concurrently); open to ME majors only.
Enrollment Comments: Quarters usually offered: Spring, Summer.
Introduction to basic numerical and analytical methods, with implementation using MATLAB. Topics include root finding, linear algebraic equations, introduction to matrix algebra, determinants, inverses and eigenvalues, curve fitting and interpolation, and numerical differentiation and integration.
ME 95. Introduction to Mechanical Engineering
(1-4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 6 units.
Participation in projects in the laboratory or machine shop. Projects may be student- or faculty-originated depending upon student interest and consent of faculty member.
ME 97. Mechanical Engineering Design Projects
(1-4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for maximum of 12 units.
Course offers students opportunity to work on established departmental design projects. P/NP grading, does not satisfy technical elective requirement.
ME 99. Introduction to Research
(1-3) STAFF
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 6 units. Students are limited to 5 units per quarter and 30 units total in all 98/99/198/199/199AA-ZZ courses combined.
Directed study to be arranged with individual faculty members. Course offers exceptional students an opportunity to participate in a research group.
Collapse Courses Upper Division 
ME 100. Professional Seminar
(1) STAFF
Prerequisite: Undergraduate standing.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for up to 3 units. May not be used as a departmental elective.
A series of weekly lectures given by university staff and outside experts in all fields of mechanical and environmental engineering.
ME 104. Mechatronics
(3) BAMIEH, PADEN
Prerequisite: ME 6; open to ME majors only.
Interfacing of mechanical and electrical systems and mechatronics. Basic introduction to sensors, actuators, and computer interfacing and control. Transducers and measurement devices, actuators, A/D and D/A conversion, signal conditioning and filtering. Practical skills developed in weekly lab exercises.
ME 105. Mechanical Engineering Laboratory
(4) BENNETT, MATTHYS, VALENTINE
Prerequisite: ME 151B, 152B, 163; and, Materials 101 or 100B.
Enrollment Comments: Quarters usually offered: Spring.
Introduction to fundamental engineering laboratory measurement techniques and report writing skills. Experiments from thermosciences, fluid mechanics, mechanics, materials science and environmental engineering. Introduction to modern data acquisition and analysis techniques.
ME 106A. Advanced Mechanical Engineering Laboratory
(3) BAMIEH
Prerequisite: ME 155A.
An advanced lab course with experiments in dynamical systems and feedback control design. Students design, troubleshoot, and perform detailed, multi-session experiments.
ME 106B. Mechanics, Materials and Structures Laboratory
(3) ZOK
Prerequisite: ME 15; ME 154; ME 156A; and Materials 100B or 101.
Experiments on mechanical behavior of materials and structures. Assessment of analytical and finite element methods for mechanical design, with applications to optimization of lightweight structures.
ME 106C. Advanced Thermo/Fluids Laboratory
(3) BENNETT
Prerequisite: ME 105 and 151A-B, ME 151C (may be concurrent) and ME 152A-B
Perform thermo/fluid experiments that emphasize elements of thermodynamics, heat transfer, and fluid mechanics. This laboratory course stresses critical thinking skills required to construct and perform experiments independently, and to investigate physical phenomena experimentally.
ME 110. Aerodynamics and Aeronautical Engineering
(3) BELTZ, MEINHART
Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 14 and 152A.
Concepts from aerodynamics, including lift and drag analysis for airfoils as well as aircraft sizing/scaling issues. Structural mechanics concepts are applied to practical aircraft design. Intended for students considering a career in aeronautical engineering.
ME 112. Energy
(3) MATTHYS
Prerequisite: Senior Undergraduate or Graduate Student status in the College of Engineering; or consent of Instructor
Introduction to the field of Energetics. Topics may include energy sources and production, energy usage, renewable technologies, hardware, operating principles, environmental impact, energy reserves, national and global energy budgets, historical perspectives, economics, societal considerations, and others.
ME 119. Introduction to Coastal Engineering
(3) STAFF
Prerequisite: ME 152A.
Quantitative description of waves and tides; refraction, shoaling. Nearshore circulation. Sediment characteristics and transport; equilibrium beach profile; shoreline protection.
ME 124. Advanced Topics in Transport Phenomena/Safety
(3) STAFF
Prerequisite: Chemical Engineering 120A-B-C; or, Mechanical Engineering 151A-B and 152A.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Chemical Engineering 124.
Hazard identification and assessments, runaway reactions, emergency relief. Plant accidents and safety issues. Dispersion and consequences of releases.
ME 125AAZZ. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
(3) STAFF
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 12 units provided letter designations are different. Students are advised to consult their faculty advisor before making their course selection.
Individual courses each concentrating on one area in the following subjects: applied mechanics, cad/cam, controls, design, environmental engineering, fluid mechanics, materials science, mechanics of solids and structures, ocean and coastal engineering, robotics, theoretical mechanics,thermal sciences, and recent developments in mechanical engineering.
ME 125A. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 125AA. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 125AB. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 125AC. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 125AD. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 125AE. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 125AF. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 125AG. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 125AH. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 125AI. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 125AJ. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 125AK. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 125AL. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 125AM. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 125AO. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 125AP. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 125AQ. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 125AR. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 125B. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 125BA. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 125BE. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 125C. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 125D. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 125E. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 125F. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 125FM. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 125G. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 125H. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 125I. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 125J. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 125K. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 125L. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 125LP. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 125M. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 125N. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 125P. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 125Q. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 125R. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 125T. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 125V. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 125X. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 125Y. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 125Z. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 128. Design of Biomedical Devices
(3) LAGUETTE
Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 10, 14, 15, 16, and 153; open to ME majors only.
Introductory course addresses the challenges of biomedical device design, prototyping and testing, material considerations, regulatory requirements, design control, human factors and ethics.
ME 134. Advanced Thermal Science
(3) STAFF
Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 151C.
This class will address advanced topics in fluid mechanics, heat transfer, and thermodynamics. Topics if interest may include combustion, phase change, experimental techniques, materials processing, manufacturing, engines, HVAC, non-newtonian fluids, etc.
ME 136. Introduction to Multiphase Flows
(3) STAFF
Prerequisite: Chemical Engineering 120A-B-C; or, ME 151C and 152A.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Chemical Engineering 136.
Development from basic concepts and techniques of fluid mechanics and heat transfer, to local behavior in multiphase flows. Key multiphase phenomena, related physics. Extension to local conservation principles to usable formulations in multiphase flows, modelling approaches. Practical examples.
ME 140A. Numerical Analysis in Engineering
(3) MOEHLIS, GIBOU, MEIBURG
Prerequisite: ME 17 with a minimum grade of C-, or Chemical Engineering 132A.
Enrollment Comments: Designed for majors. Quarters usually offered: Fall.
Numerical analysis and analytical solutions of problems described by linear and nonlinear differential equations with an emphasis on MATLAB. First and second order differential equations; systems of differential equations; linear algebraic equations, matrices and eigenvalues; boundary value problems; finite differences.
ME 140B. Theoretical Analysis in Mechanical Engineering
(3) MOEHLIS, GIBOU, MEIBURG
Prerequisite: ME 140A.
Analysis of engineering problems formulated in terms of partial differential equations. Solutions of these mathematical models by means of analytical and numerical methods. Physical interpretation of the results.
ME 141A. Introduction to Nanoelectromechanical and Microelectromechanical systems (NEMS/MEMS)
(3) PENNATHUR, TURNER
Prerequisite: ME 16 & 17; ME 152A & ME 151A (may be concurrent); or ECE 130A & 137A with a minimum grade of C- in both.
Introduction to nano- and microtechnology. Scaling laws and nanoscale physics are stressed. Individual subjects at the nanoscale including materials, mechanics, photonics, electronics, and fluidics will be described, with an emphasis on differences of behavior at the nanoscale and real-world examples.
ME 141B. MEMS: Processing and Device Characterization
(4) PENNATHUR, TURNER
Prerequisite: ME 141A, ME 163 (may be concurrent); or ECE 141A.
Enrollment Comments: Quarters usually offered: Winter.
Lectures and laboratory on semiconductor-based processing for MEMS. Description of key equipment and characterization tools used for MEMS and design, fabrication, characterization and testing of MEMS. Emphasis on current MEMS devices including accelerometers, comb drives, micro-reactors and capacitor-actuators.
ME 141C. Introduction to Microfluidics and BioMEMS
(3) MEINHART
Prerequisite: ME 141A or ECE 141A; open to ME and EE majors only.
Introduces physical phenomena associated with microscale/nanoscale fluid mechanics, microfluids, and bioMEMS. Analytical methods and numerical simulation tools are used for analysis of microfluids.
ME 146. Molecular and Cellular Biomechanics
(3) VALENTINE
Enrollment Comments: Concurrently offered with ME 246. Quarters usually offered: Fall.
Course introduces fundamental concepts in molecular and cellular biomechanics. Will consider the role of physical, thermal and chemical forces, examine their influence on cell strength and elasticity, and explore the properties of enzymatically-active materials.
ME 151A. Thermosciences 1
(4) BENNETT, MEINHART
Prerequisite: Physics 2; ME 14 with a minimum grade of C-; and, Mathematics 5C.
Enrollment Comments: Quarters usually offered: Fall.
Basic concepts in thermodynamics, system analysis, energy, thermodynamic laws, and cycles.
ME 151B. Thermosciences 2
(4) BENNETT
Prerequisite: ME 151A and 152A.
Enrollment Comments: Quarters usually offered: Winter.
Introduction to heat transfer processes, steady and unsteady state conduction, multidimensional analysis. Introduction to convective heat transfer.
ME 151C. Thermosciences 3
(3) BENNETT
Prerequisite: ME 151B and 152B. Open to ME majors only.
Convective heat transfer, external and internal flow, forced and free convection, phase change, heat exchangers. Introduction to radiative heat transfer.
ME 152A. Fluid Mechanics
(4) KRETCHETNIKOV, MEINHART
Prerequisite: Mathematics 5C; and, ME 16 with a minimum grade of C-.
Enrollment Comments: Quarters usually offered: Fall.
Introduction to the fundamental concepts in fluid mechanics and basic fluid properties. Basic equations of fluid flow. Dimensional analysis and similitude. Hydrodynamics.
ME 152B. Fluid Mechanics
(3) STAFF
Prerequisite: ME 152A. Open to ME majors only.
Incompressible viscous flow. Turbomachinery. Boundary-layer theory. Introductory considerations for one-dimensional compressible flow.
ME 153. Introduction to Mechanical Engineering Design
(3) BELTZ, TURNER
Prerequisite: ME 10 and 16; open to ME majors only.
Design of systems using mechanics, stress analysis and finite elements. Statistical problems in manufacturing and reliability. Ethics. One paper design project plus the ASME student design project.
ME 154. Design and Analysis of Structures
(3) STAFF
Prerequisite: ME 15 with a minimum grade of C-; and, ME 16 with a minimum grade of C-; open to ME majors only.
Introductory course in structural analysis and design. The theories of matrix structural analysis and finite element analysis for the solution of analytical and design problems in structures are emphasized. Lecture material includes structural theory compatibility method, slope deflection method, displacement method, and virtual work. Topics include applications to bars, beams, trusses, frames, and solids.
ME 155A. Control System Design
(3) BAMIEH, BULLO
Prerequisite: ME 17 with a minimum grade of C-; ME 140A (may be taken concurrently); ME 163.
The discipline of control and its application. Dynamics and feedback. The mathematical models: transfer functions and state space descriptions. Simple control design (PID). Assessment of a control problem, specification, fundamental limitations, codesign of system and control.
ME 155B. Control System Design
(3) PADEN
Prerequisite: ME 155A.
Dynamic system modeling using state-space methods, controllability and observability, state-space methods for control design including pole placement, and linear quadratic regulator methods. Observers and observer-based feedback controllers. Sampled-data and digital control. Laboratory exercises using MATLAB for simulation and control design.
ME 156A. Mechanical Engineering Design - I
(3) TURNER, LUCAS, MCMEEKING
Prerequisite: ME 151C, ME 152B, ME 153 and MATRL 101 (or MATRL 100B); open to ME majors only
The rational selection of engineering materials, and the utilization of Ashby- charts, stress, strain, strength, and fatigue failure consideration as applied to the design of machine elements. Lectures also support the development of system design concepts using assigned projects and involves the preparation of engineering reports and drawings.
ME 156B. Mechanical Engineering Design-II
(3) STAFF
Prerequisite: ME 156A. Open to ME majors only.
Machine elements including gears, bearings and shafts. Joint design and analysis: bolts, rivets, adhesive bonding and welding. Machine dynamics andfatigue. Design reliability and safety. Codes and standards. Topics coveredwill be applies in practical design projects.
ME 158. Computer Aided Design and Manufacturing
(3) STAFF
Prerequisite: ME 10 and ME 156A; open to ME majors only.
Emphasis on programming, operation and design of automated manufacturing tools. Students learn to program CNC tools to make parts with G&M Code and Mastercam CAM software. Students make parts in hands-on labs using CNC tools, 3D printers and laser cutters. Select topics in automated tool design and construction.
ME 162. Introduction to Elasticity
(3) MCMEEKING, BELTZ
Prerequisite: ME 15 and 140A.
Equations of equilibrium, compatibility, and boundary conditions. Solutionsof two-dimensional problems in rectangular and polar coordinates. Eigen-solutions for the Wedge and Williams' solution for cracks. Stress intensity factors. Extension, torsion, and bending. Energy theorems. Introduction to wave propagation in elastic solids.
ME 163. Engineering Mechanics: Vibrations
(3) MCMEEKING, MEZIC
Prerequisite: ME 16 with a minimum grade of C-; open to ME majors only.
Enrollment Comments: Not open for credit to students who have completed ME 163B.
Topics relating to vibration in mechanical systems; exact and approximate methods of analysis, matrix methods, generalized coordinates and Lagrange's equations, applications of systems. Basic feedback systems and controlled dynamic behavior.
ME 166. Advanced Strength of Materials
(3) TURNER, KEDWARD
Prerequisite: ME 15.
Analysis of statically determinate and indeterminate systems using integration, area moment, and energy methods. Beams on elastic foundations,curved beams, stress concentrations, fatigue, and theories of failure for ductile and brittle materials. Photoelasticity and other experimental techniques are covered, as well as methods of interpreting in-service failures.
ME 167. Structural Analysis
(3) STAFF
Prerequisite: ME 15 or 165; and, ME 140A.
Presents introductory matrix methods for analysis of structures. Topics include review of matrix algebra and linear equations, basic structural theorms including the principle of superposition and energy theorms, truss bar, bean and plane frame elements, and programming techniques to realize these concepts.
ME 169. Nonlinear Phenomena
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Physics 105A; or ME 163 or upper-division standing in ECE.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as ECE 183 and Physics 106. Not open for credit to students who have completed ECE 163C.
An introduction to nonlinear phenomena. Flows and bifurcations in one and two dimensions, chaos, fractals, strange attractors. Applications to physics, engineering, chemistry, and biology.
ME 179D. Introduction to Robotics: Dynamics and Control
(4) BYL
Prerequisite: ECE 130A or ME 155A (may be taken concurrently)
Dynamic modeling and control methods for robotic systems. Lagrangian method for deriving equations of motion, introduction to the Jacobian, and modeling and control of forces and contact dynamics at a robotic end effector. Laboratories encourage a problem-solving approach to control.
ME 179L. Introduction to Robotics: Design Laboratory
(4) PADEN
Prerequisite: Engr 3; and ME 6 or ECE 2A. Not open for credit to students who have completed ME 170C or ECE 181C.
Design, programming, and testing of mobile robots. Design problems are formulated in terms of robot performance. Students solve electromechanical problems, developing skills in brainstorming, concept selection, spatial reasoning, teamwork and communication. Robots are controlled with micro- controllers using C programming and interfaced to sensors and motors.
ME 179P. Introduction to Robotics: Planning and Kinematics
(4) BULLO
Prerequisite: Engr 3; and either ME 17 or ECE 130C (may be taken concurrently). Not open for credit to students who have completed ME 170A or ECE 181A.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as ECE 179P
Motion planning and kinematics topics with an emphasis on geometric reasoning, programming and matrix computations. Motion planning: configuration spaces, sensor-based planning, decomposition and sampling methods, and advanced planning algorithms. Kinematics: reference frames, rotations and displacements, kinematic motion models.
ME 185. Materials in Engineering
(3) LEVI, ODETTE
Prerequisite: Materials 100B or 101.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Materials 185.
Introduces the student to the main families of materials and the principlesbehind their development, selection, and behavior. Discusses the generic properties of metals, ceramics, polymers, and composites more relevant to structural applications. The relationship of properties to structure and processing is emphasized in every case.
ME 186. Manufacturing and Materials
(3) LEVI
Prerequisite: ME 151C; and ME 15; and Materials 100B or 101.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Materials 186.
Introduction to the fundamentals of common manufacturing processes and their interplay with the structure and properties of materials as they are transformed into products. Emphasis on process understanding and the key physical and basic mathematical relationships involved in each of the processes discussed.
ME 189A. Capstone Mechanical Engineering Design Project
(2) LAGUETTE
Prerequisite: ME 153; and ME 156A (may be taken concurrently).
Enrollment Comments: Designed for majors. Concurrently offered with ME 156A. Quarters usually offered: Fall. A 3-quarter sequence with grades issued for each quarter. Students may not concurrently enroll in ME 197 and ME 189A-B-C with the same design project.
Repeat Comments: Course can only be repeated as a full sequence (189A-B-C).
Students work in teams under the direction of a faculty advisor (and possibly an industrial sponsor) to tackle an engineering design project. Engineering communication, such as reports and oral presentations are covered. Emphasis on practical, hands-on experience, and the integration of analytical and design skills acquired in the companion ME 156 courses.
ME 189B. Capstone Mechanical Engineering Design Project
(2) LAGUETTE
Prerequisite: ME 189A
Enrollment Comments: Designed for majors. Concurrently offered with ME 156B. Quarters usually offered: Winter. A 3-quarter sequence with grades issued for each quarter. Students may not concurrently enroll in ME 197 and ME 189A-B-C with the same design project.
Repeat Comments: Course can only be repeated as a full sequence (189A-B-C).
Students work in teams under the direction of a faculty advisor (and possibly an industrial sponsor) to tackle an engineering design project. Engineering communication, such as reports and oral presentations, are covered. Course emphasizes practical, hands-on experience, and integrates analytical and design skills acquired in the companion ME 156 courses.
ME 189C. Capstone Mechanical Engineering Design Project
(2) LAGUETTE
Prerequisite: ME 189A,B
Enrollment Comments: Designed for majors. Quarters usually offered: Spring. A 3-quarter sequence with grades issued for each quarter. Students may not concurrently enroll in ME 197 and ME 189A-B-C with the same design project.
Repeat Comments: Course can only be repeated as a full sequence (189A-B-C).
Students work in teams under the direction of a faculty advisor (and possibly an industrial sponsor) to tackle an engineering design project. Engineering communication, such as reports and oral presentations, are covered. Course emphasizes practical, hands-on experience, and integrates analytical and design skills acquired in the companion ME 156 courses.
ME 193. Internship in Industry
(1) STAFF
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Prior departmental approval needed.
Enrollment Comments: Cannot be used as a departmental elective. May be repeated to a maximum of 2 units.
Students obtain credit for a mechanical engineering related internship and/or industrial experience under faculty supervision. A 6-10 page written report is required for credit. It may NOT be used to satisfy the engineering elective requirement for ME majors.
ME 197. Independent Projects in Mechanical Engineering Design
(1-4) STAFF
Prerequisite: ME 16; consent of instructor.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for a maximum of 12 units. No more than 4 units may be used as departmental electives.
Special projects in design engineering. Course offers motivated students opportunity to synthesize academic skills by designing and building new machines.
ME 199. Independent Studies in Mechanical Engineering
(1-5) STAFF
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor; upper-division standing; completion of two upper-division courses in Mechanical Engineering.
Enrollment Comments: Students must have a minimum 3.0 grade-point average for the preceding 3 quarters and are limited to 5 units per quarter and 30 units total in all 98/99/198/199/199DC/199RA courses combined. May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 12 units but no more than four units may be used as departmental electives.
Directed individual study.
Collapse Courses Graduate 
ME 200. Professional Seminar
(1) STAFF
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
A series of weekly lectures given by university staff and outside experts in all fields of mechanical and environmental engineering.
ME 200P. M.S. Project
(3) STAFF
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
A ten-week individual research project on an advanced topic in mechanical engineering.
ME 201. Advanced Dynamics
(3) MEZIC
Newton’s laws and symmetries, Newton, Laplace and principle of determinism, qualitative analysis of Newton’s equations of motion, Hamiltonian mechanics, one degree of freedom (DOF) systems, two DOF systems, motion in central fields, application to molecular dynamics, control of classical dynamical systems, Lagrangian mechanics, chaos and ergodic theory, rigid body motion.
ME 202. Advanced Dynamics
(3) MEZIC
Prerequisite: ME 201.
Differentiable manifolds in dynamical systems theory, differential forms, Hamiltonian phase flow, Lie algebras of vector fields, canonical formalism, integrable systems, introduction to perturbation theory, averaging, chaos in Hamiltonian systems, theory of invariant measures in dynamical systems, ergodic partition, dissipative dynamical systems, limit cycles, Lyapunov exponents, strange attractors.
ME 203. Special Topics in Dynamical Systems
(3) MEZIC
Prerequisite: ME 201.
Geometric mechanics, volume-preserving dynamical systems, molecular dynamics; Infinite dimensional dynamics and finite dimensional approximations including incompressible Euler equations and point vortex theory, transport and fluid mixing, control of measure-preserving systems, equilibrium and non-equilibrium statistical mechanics methods for vortex gases.
ME 207. Faculty Research Seminar
(1) STAFF
A series of bi-weekly presentations given by ladder faculty members to familiarize graduate students with current department research projects. This course is required to be taken by all graduate students within the first year of arrival.
ME 210A. Matrix Analysis and Computation
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Enrollment Comments: Students should be proficient in basic numerical methods, linear algebra, mathematically rigorous proofs, and some programming language. Same course as Computer Science 211A, ECE 210A, Mathematics 206A, Chemical Engineering 211A, and Geology 251A.
Graduate level-matrix theory with introduction to matrix computations. SVD's, pseudoinverses, variational characterization of eigenvalues, perturbation theory, direct and iterative methods for matrix computations.
ME 210B. Numerical Simulation
(4) PETZOLD
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Enrollment Comments: Students should be proficient in basic numerical methods, linear algebra, mathematically rigorous proofs, and some programming language. Same course as Computer Science 211B, ECE 210B, Mathematics 206B, and Chemical Engineering 211B and Geology 251B.
Linear multistep methods and Runge-Kutta methods for ordinary differential equations: stability, order and convergence. Stiffness. Differential algebraic equations. numerical solution of boundary value problems.
ME 210C. Numerical Solution of Partial Differential Equations--Finite Difference Methods.
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Enrollment Comments: Students should be proficient in basic numerical methods, linear algebra, mathematically rigorous proofs, and some programming language. Same course as Computer Science 211C, ECE 210C, Mathematics 206C, Chemical Engineering 211C, and Geolgy 251C.
Finite difference methods for hyperbolic, parabolic and elliptic PDE's, with application to problems in science and engineering. Convergence, consistency, order and stability of finite difference methods. Dissipation and dispersion. Finite volume methods. Software design and adaptivity.
ME 210D. Numerical Solution of Partial Differential Equations - Finite Element Methods
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Enrollment Comments: Students should be proficient in basic numerical methods, linear algebra, mathematically rigorous proofs, and some programming language. Same course as Computer Science 211D, ECE 210D, Mathematics 206D, Chemical Engineering 211D, and Geology 251D.
Weighted residual and finite element methods for the solution of hyperbolic, parabolic and elliptical partial differential equations, with application to problems in science and engineering. Error estimates. Standard and discontinuous Galerkin methods.
ME 215A. Applied Dynamical Systems I
(3) MOEHLIS
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
Phase-plane methods, non-linear oscillators, stability of fixed points and periodic orbits, invariant manifolds, structural stability, normal form theory, local bifurcations for vector fields and maps, applications from engineering, physics, chemistry, and biology.
ME 215B. Applied Dynamical Systems II
(3) MOEHLIS
Prerequisite: ME 215A; graduate standing.
Local codimension two bifurcations, global bifurcations, chaos for vector fields and maps, Smale horshoe, symbolic dynamics, strange attractors, universality, bifyrcation with symmetry, perturbation theory and averaging, Melnikov's method, canards, applications from engineering, physics, chemistry, and biology.
ME 216. Level Set Methods
(4) GIBOU
Prerequisite: CMPSC 211C or CH E 211C or ECE 210C or ME 210C.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as CH E 226, ECE 226, and CMPSC 216.
Mathematical description of the level set method and design of the numerical methods used in its implementations (ENO-WENO, Godunov, Lax-Friedrich, etc.). Introduction to the Ghost Fluid Method. Applications in CFD, Materials Sciences, Computer Vision and Computer Graphics.
ME 218. Introduction to Multiphase Flows
(3) STAFF
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Chemical Engineering 218.
Development from basic concepts and techniques of fluid mechanics and heat transfer, to local behavior in multiphase flows. Key multiphase phenomena, related physics. Extension of local conservation principles to usable formulations in multiphase flows. Modelling approaches. Practical examples. Computer simulations.
ME 219. Mechanics of Materials
(3) STAFF
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Materials 207.
Matrices and tensors, stress deformation and flow, compatibility conditions, constitutive equations, field equations and boundary conditionsin fluids and solids, applications in solid and fluid mechanics.
ME 220A. Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics
(3) STAFF
Introductory course in fluid mechanics. Basic equations of motion (continuity, momentum, energy, vorticity), coordinate transformations, "potential" flow, thin airfoil theory, conformal mapping, vortex dynamics, boundary layers, stability theory, laminar/turbulent transition, turbulence. Inviscid/viscid, irrotational/rotational, incompressible/ compressible flow examples.
ME 220B. Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics
(3) STAFF
Prerequisite: ME 151A-B and ME 152A-B.
Introductory course in fluid mechanics. Basic equations of motion (continuity, momentum, energy, vorticity), coordinate transformations, "potential" flow, this airfoil theory, conformal mapping, vortex dynamics, boundary layers, stability theory, laminar/turbulent transition, turbulence.
ME 221. Advanced Viscous Flow
(3) STAFF
Prerequisite: ME 220A.
Review the Navier-Stokes equations in velocity, pressure, and vorticity variables. Analyze details of important low and moderate reynolds number flow applications and then high reynolds number flows with boundary layer phenomena. Compare exact, approximate, numerical, and experimental solutionmethods.
ME 223. Turbulent Flow
(3) STAFF
Prerequisite: ME 220A-B or Chemical Engineering 220A-B.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Chemical Engineering 221.
Nature and origin of turbulence, boundary layer mechanics law of the wall, wakes, and jets, transport of properties, statistical description of turbulence, measurement problems, stratification effects. Application of principles to practical problems is stressed.
ME 225AAZZ. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
(3) STAFF
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Specialized courses dealing with advanced topics and recent developments inone or more of the following areas: dynamic systems, control and robotics, fluid mechanics, materials science and engineering, ocean engineering, solid mechanics and structures, thermal sciences.
ME 225A. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 225AA. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 225AB. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 225AC. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 225AD. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 225AE. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 225AF. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 225AG. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 225AH. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 225AJ. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 225AK. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 225AL. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 225AM. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 225AN. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 225AO. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 225AP. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 225AQ. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 225AR. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 225AS. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 225AT. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 225AU. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 225AV. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 225AX. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 225AY. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 225B. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 225BA. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 225BB. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 225BC. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 225BD. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 225BP. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 225C. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 225D. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 225E. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 225EN. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 225F. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 225FB. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 225G. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 225H. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 225HS. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 225I. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 225J. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 225KA. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 225L. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 225M. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 225MC. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 225N. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 225O. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 225OC. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 225P. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 225Q. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 225R. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 225RX. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 225S. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 225SO. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 225T. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 225TF. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 225TS. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 225U. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 225V. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 225X. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering
ME 226. Applied Numerical Methods
(3) GIBOU
Prerequisite: ME 140A.
An introduction to the numerical solution of ordinary and partial differential equations by means of finite difference and finite element procedures.
ME 230. Elasticity and Plasticity
(3) MCMEEKING
Prerequisite: ME 219 or MATRL 207
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Materials 230.
Review field equations of elasticity and plasticity. Energy principles and uniqueness theorems. Elementary problems in one and two dimensions, stress functions, and complex variable methods. Plastic stress-strain laws; flow potentials. Torsion and bending of plastic flow, slip line theory.
ME 232. Plasticity
(3) STAFF
Prerequisite: ME 219.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Materials 232.
Plastic, creep, and relaxation behavior of solids. Mechanics of inelastically strained bodies; plastic stress-strain laws; flow potentials.Torsion and bending of prismatic bars, expansion of thick shells, plane plastic flow, slip line theory. Variational formulations, approximate methods.
ME 233A. Design of Composite Structures
(3) STAFF
Prerequisite: ME 230 or ME 275A.
Emphasis is placed on the differences of design with composites vis a vis the design of conventional metallic structures. The content is directed at the class of polymermatrix composites.
ME 236. Nonlinear Control Systems
(4) TEEL
Recommended Preparation: ECE 230A.
Analysis and design of nonlinear control systems. Focus on Lyapunov stability theory, with sufficient time devoted to contrasts between linear and nonlinear systems, input-output stability and the describing function method.
ME 237. Nonlinear Control Design
(4) TEEL
Prerequisite: ECE 236 or ME 236.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as ECE 237.
Stabilizability by linearization and by geometric methods. State feedback design and input/output linearization. Observability and output feedback design. Singular perturbations and composite control. Backstepping design of robust controlers for systems with uncertain non-linearities. Adaptive nonlinear control.
ME 239. Conduction Heat Transfer
(3) STAFF
Prerequisite: Undergraduate course in heat transfer.
Development of mathematical representation of conduction heat transfer and techniques available for analytical, analog, and numerical solutions.
ME 240. Convective Heat Transfer
(3) STAFF
Prerequisite: Undergraduate course in heat transfer.
Solutions to the momentum, continuity, and energy equations will be considered for both natural and forced convection. Applications to industrial problems, convective transfer in high-speed flows, heat transferin rarefied flows, and the effects of chemical reactions on convective rates will be included.
ME 241. Radiative Energy Transfer
(3) STAFF
Prerequisite: Undergraduate course in heat transfer.
The physical nature of radiation and of its interaction with matter, conservation principles in radiative transfer and their relation to molecular and convective processes, and thermodynamic equilibrium with consideration of nondimensional parameters is considered. Applications to astrophysics, combustion, and plasma technology are discussed.
ME 243A. Linear Systems I
(4) BAMIEH
Prerequisite: ECE 210A.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as ECE 230A.
Internal and external descriptions. Solution of state equations. Controllability and observability realizations. Pole assignment, assignment, observers; modern compensator design. Distribance localization and decoupling. Least-squares control. Least-squares estimation; Kalman filters; smoothing. The seperation theorem; LQG compensator design. Computational considerations. Selected additional topics.
ME 243B. Linear Systems II
(4) BAMIEH
Prerequisite: ECE 140; 230A or ME 243A; and ME 210A.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as ECE 230B.
Internal and external descriptions. Solution of state equations. Controllability and observability realizations. Pole assignment, assignment, observers; modern compensator design. Distribance localization and decoupling. Least-squares control. Least-squares estimation; Kalman filters; smoothing. The seperation theorem; LQG compensator design. Computational considerations. Selected additional topics.
ME 244A. Advanced Theoretical Methods in Engineering
(4) FREDRICKSON
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Chemical Engineering 230A.
Methods of solution of partial differential equations and boundary value problems. Linear vector and function spaces, generalized fourier analysis, Sturm-Liouville theory, calculus of variations, and conformal mapping techniques.
ME 244B. Advanced Theoretical Methods in Engineering
(3) STAFF
Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 244A and consent of instructor.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Chemical Engineering 230B.
Advanced mathematical methods for engineers and scientists. Complex analysis, integral equations and Green's functions. Asymptotic analysis of integrals and sums. Boundary layer methods and WKB theory.
ME 246. Molecular and Cellular Biomechanics
(3) VALENTINE
Enrollment Comments: Concurrently offered with ME 146. Quarters usually offered: Fall.
Course introduces fundamental concepts in molecular and cellular biomechanics. Will consider the role of physical, thermal and chemical forces, examine their influence on cell strength and elasticity, and explore the properties of enzymatically-active materials.
ME 250. Advanced Thermodynamics
(3) STAFF
Prerequisite: ME 151A-B.
An extended treatment of the fundamentals of classical thermodynamics, including availability and reversibility, the chemical potential, properties of matter, thermochemistry, chemical equilibrium of real gases and gas mixtures.
ME 252A. Computational Fluid Dynamics
(3) STAFF
Prerequisite: ME 210C or Computer Science 211C or ECE 210C or Mathematics 206C or ChemicaEngineering 211C.
Numerical simulation of fluid flows. Basic discretization techniques for parabolic, elliptic, and hyperbolic conservation laws. Stability and accuracy. Diffusion equation, linear convection equation.
ME 252B. Computational Fluid Dynamics
(3) STAFF
Prerequisite: ME 210C or Computer Science 211C or ECE 210C or Mathematics 206C or ChemicaEngineering 211C.
Discussion of appropriate boundary conditions. Nonlinear convection dominated problems, curvilinear coordinates, basics of grid generation. Inviscid flow, boundary layer flow, incompressible Navier-Stokes flows.
ME 254. Optimal Control of Dynamic Systems
(4) BAMIEH
Prerequisite: ME 243A or ECE 230A or equivalent
Calculus of variations and Gateaux and Frechet derivatives. Optimization in dynamic systems and Pontryagin's principle. Invariant Imbedding and deterministic and stochastic Dynamic Programming. Numerical solutions of optimal control problems. Min-max problems and differential games. Extensive treatment of Linear Quadratic Problems.
ME 256. Introductory Robust Control with Applications
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: ECE 230A or ME 255A; and, ECE 230B or ME 243B (may be taken concurrently).
Enrollment Comments: Same course as ECE 232.
Robust Control theory; uncertainty modeling; stability of systems in the presence of norm-bounded perturbations; induced norm performance problems; structured singular value analysis; H-infinity control theory; model reduction; computer simulation based design project involving practical problems.
ME 260A. Materials Structure and Bonding
(3) MILSTEIN
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Crystal structures (Miller indices, Bravais lattices, symmetry operations).Modeling of atomic bonding, determination and applications of interatomic potentials, atomic basis for elastic moduli. Crystal anisotrophy. Lattice statics and molecular dynamics computations.
ME 260B. Bonding and Crystal Elasticity
(3) MILSTEIN
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Atomic basis for structure, elastic behavior, and stability of crystalline solids at finite strain. Anistrophy of stress-strain relations. Determination and applications of embedded atom and pseudopotential models. Lattice and molecular dynamics computations.
ME 264. Mechanical Behavior of Materials
(3) ZOK, ODETTE
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Materials 220.
Concepts of stress and strain. Deformation of metals, polymers, and ceramics. Elasticity, viscoelasticity, plasitc flow, and creep. Linear elastic fracture mechanics. Mechanisms of ductile and brittle fracture.
ME 265. Composite Materials
(3) STAFF
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Materials 261.
Stress and strain relations in composites. Residual stresses. The fracture resistance of organic and inorganic matrix composites. Statistical aspects of fiber failure. Composite laminates and delamination cracks. Cumulative damage concepts. Interface properties. Design criteria.
ME 271. Finite Element Structural Analysis
(3) STAFF
Prerequisite: ME 219.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Materials 240.
Definitions and basic element operations displacement approach in linear elasticity. Element formulation: direct methods and variational methods. Global analysis procedures: assemblage and solution. Plane stress and plane strain. Solids of revolution and general solids. Isoparametric representation and numerical integration. Computer implementation.
ME 275. Fracture Mechanics
(3) STAFF
Prerequisite: ME 219.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Materials 234.
Analytic solutions of a stationary crack under static loading. Elastic and elastoplastic analysis. The J integral. Energy balance and crack growth. Criteria for crack initiation and growth. Dynamic crack propagation. Fatigue. The micromechanics of fracture.
ME 283A. Waves in Fluids
(3) STAFF
Prerequisite: ME 152A-B or equivalent.
The fundamental mechanics of water and acoustic waves. Governing equations.Wave propagation, refraction, and reflection. Noise generation. Dispersive effects; group velocity; stationary phase; ray theory. Onshore waves. Ship waves and wave resistance. Introduction to nonlinear effects; stokes limiting wave; solitons.
ME 285. Geophysical Fluid Dynamics
(3) STAFF
Prerequisite: ME 152A.
The ocean-atmosphere system. Air-sea interaction governing equations for rotating system: conservation of mass, momentum and energy. Ocean surface waves: generation, spectral characteristics. Internal waves. Geostrophic motion. Rotating boundary layers: Ekman dynamics. Tides. Kelvin waves.
ME 286. Nearshore Processes
(3) STAFF
Prerequisite: ME 152A.
Nearshore wave dynamics: shoaling, breaking, run-up. Beach processes: longshore currents, undertow, rip currents, infragravity waves. Turbulent boundary layers: wave-current interaction. Sediment transport: critical conditions, bedload and suspended load, bedorms, scour, inlet migration andclosure, harbor siltation, cliff erosion.
ME 291A. Physics of Transducers
(3) SOH
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
Recommended Preparation: ECE 220 (may be taken concurrently).
The use of concepts in electromagnetic theory and solid state physics to describe capacitive, piezoresistive, piezoelectric and tunneling transduction mechanisms and analyze their applications in microsystems technology.
ME 292. Design of Transducers
(3) PENNATHUR, TURNER
Prerequisite: graduate standing
Design issues associated with microscale transduction. Electrodynamics, linear and nonlinear mechanical behavior, sensing methods, MEMS-specific fabrication rules, and layout are all covered. Modeling techniques for electromechanical systems are also discussed.
ME 295. Group Studies: Controls, Dynamical Systems, and Computation
(1) STAFF
Enrollment Comments: Same course as ECE 295, Computer Science 592, and Chemical Engineering 295.
A series of weekly lectures given by university staff and outside experts in the fields of control systems, dynamical systems, and computation.
ME 501. Teaching Assistant Practicum
(1-4) STAFF
Enrollment Comments: Normally required of students serving as teaching assistants. No unit credit allowed towards advanced degree.
Practical experience in the various activities associated with teaching, including lecturing, supervision of laboratories and discussion sections, preparation and grading of homework and exams.
ME 503. Research Assistant Practicum
(1-4) STAFF
Enrollment Comments: Will not count as unit credit towards M.S. or Ph.D. degree in mechanical engineering.
Practical experience in the various activities associated with research, including experimental work, theoretical work and analyses, and assisting department faculty and other professional researchers in their duties.
ME 596. Directed Research
(1-12) STAFF
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Enrollment Comments: Not applicable to course requirement for M.S. or Ph.D. degree. S/U grading.
Experimental or theoretical research undertaken under the direction of a faculty member for graduate students who have not yet advanced to candidacy.
ME 597. Individual Study for Ph.D. Qualifying Examination
(1-12) STAFF
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
Enrollment Comments: No unit credit allowed toward advanced degree. Maximum of 12 units per quarter; enrollment limited to 24 units per examination. Instructor is normally student's major advisor. S/U grading.
Individual studies for ph.d. qualifying examination.
ME 598. Master's Thesis Research and Preparation
(1-12) STAFF
Prerequisite: Consent of thesis adviser.
Enrollment Comments: No unit credit allowed toward advanced degree.
For research underlying the thesis and writing of the thesis.
ME 599. Ph.D. Dissertation Research and Preparation
(1-12) STAFF
Prerequisite: Consent of dissertation adviser.
Enrollment Comments: No unit credit allowed toward advanced degree.
For research and preparation of the dissertation.