UC Santa Barbara General CatalogUniversity of California, Santa Barbara

Anthropology

Department of Anthropology
Division of Social Sciences
Humanities and Social Sciences 2001
Telephone: (805) 893-2257
Website: www.anth.ucsb.edu 
Department Chair: Stuart Tyson Smith

 


 

Some courses displayed may not be offered every year. For actual course offerings by quarter, please consult the Quarterly Class Search or GOLD (for current students). To see the historical record of when a particular course has been taught in the past, please visit the Course Enrollment Histories.

Anthropology
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Collapse Courses Lower Division 
ANTH 2. Introductory Cultural Anthropology
(4) STAFF
The nature of culture: survey of the range of cultural phenomena, includingmaterial culture, social organization, religion, and other topics.
ANTH 2H. Introductory Cultural Anthropology Honors
(1) STAFF
Prerequisite: Must be concurrently enrolled in ANTH 2
Students receive one unit for this honors seminar. Intended for highly motivated and well prepared students.
ANTH 3. Introductory Archaeology
(5) SMITH
An introduction to archaeology and the prehistory of humankind from the earliest times up to the advent of literate civilization and cities, also processes of cultural change. Partly self-paced learning.
ANTH 3SS. Introduction to Archaeology
(4) STAFF
Introduction to archaeology and the prehistory of humankind from the earliest times up to the advent of civilization and cities, also processes ofcultural change.
ANTH 5. Introductory Biological Anthropology
(4) GAULIN
An introductory course in human evolutionary biology. Natural selection and its genetic basis are used to highlight a variety of human traits. The fossil record is addressed, but the course takes more of an "adaptationist" than a paleontological perspective.
ANTH 5H. Introductory Biological Anthropology Honors
(1) GAULIN
Prerequisite: Must be concurrently enrolled in ANTH 5
Students receive one unit for this honors seminar. Intended for highly motivated and well prepared students participating in the College Honors Program.
ANTH 7. Introductory Biosocial Anthropology
(4) TOOBY
An introduction to our evolved, universal human nature, the evolution of the human mind, and how they shape behavior, social life, and culture. Topicsinclude friendship, mate choice, incest avoidance, cooperation, revenge, status, jealousy, emotions, group formation, and intergroup aggression.
ANTH 9. Methods in the Human Behavioral Sciences
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: ANTH 5 or 7 OR instructor approval
Introduces the design and analysis of scientific studies on human behavior.Emphasizes theory-based testing of hypotheses, with examples drawn from human ecology, physiology, and behavior. Covers a range of quantitative and qualitative methods including observation, surveys, and experiments.
ANTH 25. Violence and the Japanese State
(4) FRUHSTUCK
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Japanese 25 and History 25.
Examines historiographically and sociologically the Japanese state's various engagements in violent acts during war and peace times.
ANTH 99. Independent Studies
(1-4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Enrollment Comments: Students must have a 3.0 overall GPA. May be taken for a maximum of four units of Anthropology 99 per quarter, and can be repeated for a maximum of 8 units. Students are limited to five units per quarter and 30 units total inall 98/99/198/199/199AA-ZZ courses combined.
Introduction to research in Anthropology. Independent research under the guidance of a faculty member in the department. Course offers exceptional students the opportunity to undertake independent research or work in a research group.
Collapse Courses Upper Division 
ANTH 100. Basic Archaeological Concepts
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Anthropology 3 or 3SS.
A survey of important archaeological methods of excavation, analysis, andinterpretation. Focus will be on the problems and promise of various approaches to the explanation of past human behavior.
ANTH 102. The Anthropology of Slavery over Time and Space
(4) BROOKS
Prerequisite: Anthropology 2 or Anthropology 3 or 3SS.
Explores the evolution in forms of human bondage around the world and from the earliest cases to the present. Archaeological and ethnographic case-studies are featured, as are historical transformations and efforts to abolish slavery.
ANTH 102A. Introduction to Women, Culture, and Development
(4) HANCOCK, BHAVNANI
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Global Studies 180A and Sociology 156A.
Critical examination of the relations among women, culture and development.Topics include colonialism, violence, globalization, and the state, health and reproduction, biotechnology, representation, and resistance movements.
ANTH 103. Human-Wildlife Interactions
(4) BROWN
Prerequisite: Anthropology 5.
Survey of human-wildlife interactions (e.g., bushmeat, pet trade, crop-raiding). Students examine cascading effects on wildlife, landscapes, and human populations, as well as mitigating approaches relating to our changing perceptions of wildlife and nature.
ANTH 103A. Anthropology of China
(4) YANG
Prerequisite: upper division standing or instructor approval
This course adopts an anthropological approach to contemporary China through ethnographic research. Topics include: Maoist society, rural life, migrant workers, gender and sexuality, media culture, youth culture, the urban work unit, from Maoist class-status system to capitalist class structure.
ANTH 103B. Anthropology of Japan
(4) LEWALLEN
Prerequisite: upper division standing or instructor approval
This course examines Japan as depicted in contemporary ethnography. We consider how Japan has been imagined as a distinct culture by exploring gender,religion, family structures, the education system, the environment, management of difference, globalization and domestication, immigration, and modernization.
ANTH 103C. Anthropology of Contemporary Korea
(4) PAI
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing or instructor approval
Enrollment Comments: Same course as EACS 103C. Students who have completed KOR 82 should not enroll in EACS/ANTH 103C.
This course is an introduction to contemporary Korea covering the major societal transformations since the Korean War. Topics include nationalism, the creation of national symbols and racial identity, family, marriage, consumption, television dramas, globalization, tourism and new Korean Wave.
ANTH 104. Risk & Inequality
(4) HARTHORN
Prerequisite: Anthropology 2
Examines risk and perception in relation to environmental and health inequality within larger political, social and cultural frameworks across theglobe.
ANTH 105. Human Variation
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Anthropology 5.
An examination of traditional race concepts contrasted with an approach to human variation through the analysis of biologically adaptive traits.
ANTH 106. History of Anthropological Theory
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Anthropology 2.
An account of the intellectual traditions of anthropology, the main figureswho shaped these traditions, and the issues that both divided and united anthropologists at different periods of time.
ANTH 106B. Ritual and Violence.
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: A prior course in Religious Studies or Anthropology.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Religious Studies 100B.
Focuses on the link between ritual and violence in archaic and/or traditional societies. Attention is also given to the persistence of this link in the contemporary context.
ANTH 107. Psychological Anthropology
(4) TOOBY
Field from Freud and Mead to present; how human nature (universal psychological mechanisms) and culture interact to form individual psychologies, identities, genders, social attitudes, worldviews, and traditions; how cognitive development shapes belief systems, reasoning and symbolism; emotions, preferences, thinking, and pathologies in cross- cultural perspective.
ANTH 108. Educating the Native
(4) SALDIVAR
We look at different educational projects, such as Indian boarding Schools, English-only laws, the "indirect rule" of the British colonies. We address the not-always-clear line between education as a form of social control or as a form of liberation.
ANTH 109. Human Universals
(4) STAFF
A critical overview of those characteristics of human psyche, behavior, society, and culture that are allegedly found among all peoples: the constantsof human nature.
ANTH 110. Technology and Culture
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Anthropology 2.
Theories of technological evolution and innovation. Meanings of technology.The social and cultural impact of technology on our everyday lives, including automobile culture, industrial farming, the telephone, and technologies of the body.
ANTH 111. The Anthropology of Food
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Critical survey of different anthropological approaches of food production and consumption: biological implications of diet; relations between agricultural forms and political systems; the meanings of feasting; cooking, classand gender; food and national identity.
ANTH 112. Bioarchaeology
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Anthropology 180A.
A survey of research in the field of bioarchaeology including studies of paleodemography, paleopathology and their relevance to testing about the biological and cultural adaptations of earlier human populations and interpreting behavior from the human skeleton.
ANTH 112Z. Theoretical Approaches in Contemporary Archaeology
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Anthropology 3 or 3SS or 100.
A survey of the history of archaeological theory, and an overview of major theoretical approaches and applications in contemporary archaeology. The course demonstrates how theory serves as a guide to research and to the interpretation of archaeological data.
ANTH 113. Indigenous People and the Nation State in the Americas
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: ANTH 2 or CH ST 1A, 1B, or 1C.
The changing relationship between indigenous people and the state. Compare the differences and similarities between indigenous peoples' mobilizations in the cases of Canada, USA, Ecuador, Chile, Guatemala, Bolivia and Mexico.
ANTH 113FB. Science and Society
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Anthropological analysis of scientific institutions and the process by which scientific knowledge is produced (e.g. lab culture); cultural dimensions of scientific thought; science, nationalism, power, money and the consumption of science.
ANTH 114. Social Organization
(4) STAFF
Emphasis on various theories of social structure and social organization incross-cultural perspective; kinship, social stratification, and ethnicity.
ANTH 115. Language, Culture, and Place
(4) JEFFREY HOELLE
Prerequisite: Not open to freshmen.
Focuses on the dialectical interplay between humans and the environment and how people use language to classify, make sense of, and attribute moral and symbolic meaning to places and landscapes.
ANTH 116A. Myth, Ritual and Symbol
(4) HANCOCK
Prerequisite: Anthropology 2.
Uses ethnographic case studies, films and performance videos to explore myth, ritual, and symbolism cross-culturally. Compares and contrasts the symbolic dimensions of gender and ethnic identity, world view, social and political organization and change in different societies.
ANTH 116B. Anthropological Approaches to Religion
(4) HANCOCK
Prerequisite: Anthropology 2 and upper-division standing.
Exploration of anthropology's distinctive approaches to religion using theoretical works, historical and ethnographic case studies, film, and performance video. Topics include sociopolitical dimensions of religion; ritual structure, and experience; cognitive, aesthetic, and semiotic approaches to religion.
ANTH 116C. Anthropology of Religion Practicum
(4) HANCOCK
Prerequisite: Anthropology 2 and upper-division standing.
In this course, students acquire basic methodological skills in cultural anthropology by carrying out ethnographic field research with local religious communities.
ANTH 117. Borders and Borderlands
(4) WALSH
Prerequisite: Anthropology 2.
The theoretical concept of "borderlands" examined through a discussion of the societies, economics and cultures that form on geopolitical borders. TheMexico-U.S. border will be discussed in detail.
ANTH 118. Archaeological Biogeochemistry
(6) KURIN
Prerequisite: ANTH 3, 5, 9 OR CHEM 1, 2, 6 OR EARTH 2, 3, 8 OR GEOG 5, 12 OR EEMB 21, 55
Recommended Preparation: Background in the natural/physical sciences in advised
Enrollment Comments: Designed for students who intend to go onto graduate school.
Introduces stable isotope biogeochemistry and XRF compositional analysis and their application to ancient and modern humans, faunal bones and teeth.Corresponding lab sections will teach sample preparation and hypothesis building to reconstruct aspects of climate, diet, mobility, and health.
ANTH 118TS. Archaeology of the Ancient Near East
(4) SMITH
Prerequisite: Anthropology 3 or 3SS or MES 45.
This course combines archaeology and history to trace the development of the cultures of the ancient Near East from the origins of civilization through the rise of empires, ending with the conquest of Alexander the Great in c. 300 BCE.
ANTH 119. Household Archaeology
(4) WILSON
Prerequisite: Anth 3 or Anth 3SS
Enrollment Comments: Designed for majors.
Household Archaeology plays a central role in the analysis of a wide range of anthropological issues, such as wealth, status, economic risk, gender, political networks, and ethnicity. Focuses on how to integrate household data into abstract general theories of social process.
ANTH 121. Human Evolution
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Anthropology 5.
The nature and results of the evolutionary processes responsible for the formation and differentiation of human populations.
ANTH 121T. Genetics, Natural Selection, and Human Evolution
(4) TOOBY
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
An introduction to the nature and role of genes in evolution, in natural selection, in sexual reproduction, in cellular regulation, in human development, in structuring universal human adaptive design, and in creating individual and intergroup similarities and differences.
ANTH 122. Anthropology of World Systems
(4) STAFF
Focuses on the penetration and impact of global capitalist economy (national and multinational) upon local level third world societies, communities, and groups. A world system perspective is taken and anthropological case studies are presented from Asia, Africa, and Latin America.
ANTH 123. Feeding Ecology of Primates and Humans
(4) BROWN
Prerequisite: Anthropology 5.
Recommended Preparation: ANTH 153T
Foraging and feeding patterns in primates with some discussion of human patterns. Topics include digestive physiology; measurement of energy flows and food availability; foraging theory; and the evolutionary context of human diets.
ANTH 123MG. Anthropological Data Analysis
(4) GURVEN
Prerequisite: Anthropology 9 and upper-division standing.
Recommended Preparation: Some mathematics or statistics background.
A hands-on course which explores the scientific process as used in bio- and bio-cultural anthropological research. Emphasizes hypothesis testing, data collection and data analysis. Students examine and analyze new anthropological data from ongoing socio-ecological research.
ANTH 125. Anthropology of Gender
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Not open to freshmen.
The cross-cultural study of gender from a feminist perspective. Topics may include gender and nature, gender and the division of labor, gender and kinship, gender and subjectivity, gender and sexuality, gender and the state, gender and knowledge/discourse.
ANTH 127. Hunters and Gatherers
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Anthropology 2.
What do Pygmies, Aborigines, and Eskimos have in common? What is the relationship between nature and culture in these simple societies? These questions and others will be examined through case studies and cross-culturalcomparisons.
ANTH 128. The Archaeology of Gender
(4) VANDERWARKER
Prerequisite: Anthropology 3
Enrollment Comments: Designed for majors. Quarters usually offered: Winter, Spring.
The development of gender as a research focus in archaeology over the past several decades. Examine case studies that consider the identification and understanding of past gender relations, specifically how gender relations are materialized in the archaeological record.
ANTH 129. Ethnographic Research Methods: Ethics and Engagement
(4) LEWALLEN
Prerequisite: Upper division standing
Interrogation of ethnographic research, its development and its ethical implications. Weighing approaches such as participatory action research, engaged and collaborative research, and decolonized methodologies. Students will develop projects based on a critical reading of these models.
ANTH 129MG. Behavioral Ecology of Hunter Gatherers
(4) GURVEN
Prerequisite: Anthropology 5 or 7.
A thorough introduction using a behavioral ecology approach to the diversity of behaviors found among foragers in Africa, South America, Southeast Asia, and Australia. Topics include: diet and subsistence, mating, demography,social behavior, mobility and settlement patterns, gender, indigenous rights, and conservation.
ANTH 130A. Coupled Human and Natural Systems: Risks, Vulnerability, Resilience, and Disasters
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Anthropology 2 or Environmental Studies 1 or 3.
Enrollment Comments: Quarters usually offered: Fall. Same course as Environmental Studies 130A.
Examines human dimensions of global environmental change in developing countries from an interdisciplinary social science perspective. Compares and contrasts alternative conceptual and analytical models of dynamic, interrelated human-environmental systems and presents recent approaches to understanding risk, vulnerability, resilience, and disasters.
ANTH 130B. Global Tourism and Environmental Conservation
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Anthropology 2 or Environmental Studies 1 or 3.
Recommended Preparation: Environmental Studies 130A or Anthropology 130A.
Enrollment Comments: Quarters usually offered: Winter. Same course as Environmental Studies 130B.
Focus on the contradictions between international tourism as an economic development strategy and environmental conservation efforts, especially in an era of climate change. One major objective is to help students make more informed decisions about their own tourist experiences.
ANTH 130C. Global Food Systems and Human Food Security
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Anthropology 2 or Environmental Studies 1 or 3.
Recommended Preparation: Anthropology 130A or 130B or Environmental Studies 130A or 130B.
Enrollment Comments: Quarters usually offered: Spring. Same course as Environmental Studies 130C.
Examines history of global food systems and its impacts on ecosystems, ecologies, and human nutrition and food security. How agricultural, capturefisheries, and aquacultural industries were integrated into the global food system. Provides information to make more informed decisions about consuming these products.
ANTH 131. North American Indians
(4) GAMBLE
Prerequisite: Upper Division Standing
The origins, development, and attainments of New World aboriginal cultures north of Mexico. Some emphasis is given to California groups such as the Chumash.
ANTH 131CA. California Indians
(4) STAFF
Investigation of the diversity of California Indian societies at the beginning of European colonization, including social organization, economy, material culture, and ideology. Also considered are origins and historic changes. Emphasis is placed on central and southern California.
ANTH 132TS. Ceramic Analysis in Archaeology
(4) SMITH
Prerequisite: Anthropology 3 or 3SS.
An overview of how ceramics are used in archaeology. Topics include potterymanufacture, classification, stylistic and functional analysis, scientific analysis, chronology, production and exchange, ceramic consumption and socio-political organization.
ANTH 133. Cultural Development in Mesoamerica
(4) VANDERWARKER
Enrollment Comments: Offered periodically.
The rise and fall of various ancient civilizations such as those of the Maya, Aztecs, Toltecs, Teotihuacanos, and Olmec as well as their cultural antecedents. This course uses self-paced audiovisual modules as well as traditional lecture format.
ANTH 134. Modern Cultures of Latin America
(4) STAFF
Continuities and changes in the contemporary cultures of peasant and urban societies in Mexico, Central, and South America. Examination of cultural institutions and values, social stratification, village and urban life, elites, urbanization.
ANTH 135. Modern Mexican Culture
(4) STAFF
The impact of dependency, industrialization, urbanization, technology, and modern communications on Mexican society in the Twentieth Century. Examination of recent sociocultural contemporary urban and rural communities, classstructure, value orientations, ethnic minorities, and national integration.
ANTH 136. Peoples and Cultures of the Pacific
(4) STAFF
The aboriginal and modern cultures of Polynesia, Melanesia, and Micronesia.
ANTH 137. The Ancient Maya
(4) STAFF
The splendiferous Maya civilization as it waxed and waned during ancient times.
ANTH 138TS. Archaeology of Egypt
(4) SMITH
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Selected topics on the archaeology of ancient Egypt, placing the monuments of this great civilization in the context of its rise and development. Emphasis on ancient Egyptian material culture as a source for understanding Egyptian political, social, and economic dynamics.
ANTH 139. Indigenous Peoples
(4) STAFF
Survey of indigenous societies, including: resistance, response, and adaptations to colonial incursions; colonial and postcolonial politics; ethnic and cultural assimilation; indigenous ethnic resistance; indigenous political movements. Other topics explored include ethnocide and ecocide; indigenous property rights; effects of globalization.
ANTH 140RM. Research Methods in Cultural Anthropology
(4) STONICH
Prerequisite: Anthropology 2.
Introduction to basic methods in social and cultural anthropology. Focus ison the role of fieldwork, preparation for field research, data collection, management, and analysis.
ANTH 141. Agriculture and Society in Mexico: Past and Present
(4) STAFF
The evolution of rural Mexico: from origins of Mesoamerican agriculture to the rise of high civilization; from the establishment of the colonial system to the demise of colonial agricultural institutions; from the revolution of 1910 to the enactment of land reform and development programs. Emphasis will be made on the role of peasantry in the making of the modernstate.
ANTH 142. Peoples and Cultures of India
(4) STAFF
Rise of Indian Civilization from prehistoric times to the present; regionaldivisions of India; family, kin, caste groups, and village life; social organization above village level; effects of urbanization, British rule, and independence.
ANTH 143F. Ethics in Archaeology
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Anthropology 3 or 3SS.
An analysis of ethics in contemporary archaeology. Topics include reburial and repatriation, interpretation of the archaeological record in the context of historically oppressed groups, ethnic minorities, and non-western societies. The course also includes the ethics of collecting and managing cultural property.
ANTH 144. The Archaeology of Warfare
(4) WILSON
Enrollment Comments: Designed for majors.
Tracks cross-cultural ethnographic research and archaeological case studiesof violence to provide a historically contextualized and data-rich exploration of violence in the ancient world.
ANTH 145. Anthropological Demography and Life History
(4) GURVEN
Prerequisite: Anthropology 5 or 7 or upper-division standing; or Environmental Studies 2 or 3.
Introduces students to anthropologic applications of demography and life history theory. Focuses on ecological approaches to population dynamics, birth and death processes, and policy implications in light of population "problems" among traditional and modern societies.
ANTH 146. Development Anthropology
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
An introduction to the planning of economic development in the "Third World" and its social consequences from the perspective of anthropology.
ANTH 147. Water and Society
(4) WALSH
Prerequisite: ANTH 2 or Consent of instructor
Covers the longstanding debate over the relation between irrigation and state formation, as well as current developments in the study of water and society. Emphasis is placed on people living in arid and semi-arid environments.
ANTH 148. Ecological Anthropology
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Anthropology 2; upper-division standing.
Focuses on the complex and dynamic interactions between human beings and their physical environment. Examines ecological thinking in anthropology and the various theoretical approaches within the discipline that have developed from the coalescence of natural and social sciences.
ANTH 148A. Comparative Ethnicity
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Anthropology 2 or 5.
A cross-cultural examination of the part that ethnicity and race play in human affairs.
ANTH 150B. Archaeology of Andean Civilizations
(4) SCHREIBER
Prerequisite: Anthropology 3; not open to freshmen.
Recommended Preparation: Upper-division courses in archaeology.
A survey of the prehistory of Andean South America beginning with complex cultures of the Initial Period and ending with an overview of the Inca Empire. Major cultures include Chavin, Nasca, Moche, Wari and Tiwanaku.
ANTH 150C. The Inca Empire
(4) SCHREIBER
Prerequisite: Anthropology 3 or 3SS.
An in-depth study of the fabled Inca Empire of South America, including archaeological and historical sources. Topics include Inca origins, political organization, economy, and social structure.
ANTH 151T. Evolutionary Psychology
(4) GAULIN, TOOBY
Prerequisite: Anthropology 5 or Psychology 1.
Surveys evolutionary psychology, examining traditional psychological topicsthrough Darwinian lenses. Traditional psychology answers mechanistic questions about how perception, emotion, cognition, development and social interactions work. Evolutionary psychology addresses the complementary functionalquestion of why they work the way they do.
ANTH 152. Environmental Anthropology
(4) HOELLE
Prerequisite: Environmental Studies 1 or 3 or Anthropology 2.
Enrollment Comments: Same Course as ENV S 151
Examines the ways that humans interact with, use, and perceive the environment and nature, with a focus on the cultural, political, and economic features of human environment relationships across time and in different parts of the world. Through readings, in-class activities and discussions, field trips, and research projects, students will gain a better understanding of how anthropological theory, research, and applications can be used to address contemporary environment topics and problems.
ANTH 153. Seminar on Primate and Human Sexual Behavior
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
A critical examination of the nature and determinants of human sexuality, emphasizing evolutionary and cross-cultural approaches.
ANTH 153S. The Evolution of Human Sexuality
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Anthropology 5
Recommended Preparation: Anthropology 7.
Exploration of the psychological mechanism--adaptations--that underpin human sexual feeling, thought, and action. Emphasis on male-female differences, "engineering" analyses, the comparative method as sources of information about adaptive design. Includes study of sexual arousal, attractiveness, jealousy, and competition.
ANTH 153T. Primate Behavior
(4) GAULIN
Prerequisite: Anthropology 5 or 7; upper-division standing.
An introduction to primatology and the principles of behavioral ecology, using langur, vervet, macaque, baboon, gorilla, and chimpanzee field studies to illustrate theories of foraging, parenting, kinship, sexual selection, incest avoidance, aggression, and dominance. Concludes with applications to human evolution.
ANTH 154. Special Topics in Social Anthropology
(4) BROOKS
Prerequisite: Completion of a previous course in HIST or ANTH.
Recommended Preparation: HIST 9 or WRIT 109HU
Enrollment Comments: Designed for students who intend to do graduate work in social or behavioral sciences.
Seminar. A critical review of selected theoretical and methodological contributions of social anthropology to the description, analysis, and comparison of human societies.
ANTH 155. Prehistory of California and the Great Basin
(4) GAMBLE
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
A survey of the prehistory of California and the Great Basin, which includes principally the states of Nevada and Utah. Consideration is also given tohow archaeologists construct regional cultural developments and attempt to explain prehistoric cultural change.
ANTH 156. Understanding Africa
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
A general introduction to the peoples of Africa: their histories, economies, political systems, and cultures. How should we, as outsiders, understand the diversity of this great continent, its human problems and its significance in the modern world?
ANTH 157AAZZ. Ethnographic Field Methods
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Anthropology 2
Enrollment Comments: Misc: May be repeated two times provided content is different.
Introduction to skills and tools of data collection through fieldwork in cultural anthropology. Emphasis on techniques, methods, and concepts of ethnographic research and how basic observational information is systematized for presentation, analysis, and cross-cultural comparison.
ANTH 157ES. Ethnographic Field Methods
ANTH 157FS. Ethnographic Field Methods
ANTH 157L. Medical Anthropology: Cultural Perspectives on Health and Therapeutics
(4) HARTHORN
Prerequisite: Anthropology 2
Considers non-western medical systems as well as the cultural practices of western biomedicine as cultural systems, each with their own patterns of knowledge and power, understandings of efficacy and well-being, ideological constructs, and therapeutic literal practices.
ANTH 160. Cultural Ecology
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Anthropology 2.
Ranging from moose hunters to rice farmers, cultures seem tremendously diverse, yet cultural forms do show clear patterns. The relationship of these patterns to the natural and social environment will be examined.
ANTH 161. Human Growth and Development
(4) GURVEN
Prerequisite: Anthropology 5 or 7.
Analyzes human growth and development from an evolutionary and cross-cultural perspective. Life stages from birth to death are considered, and contrasted with other primates. Other topics include brain evolution, fetal programming, sexual dimorphism, senescence, immunity, play, parental care.
ANTH 162. Prehistoric Food Production
(4) VANDERWARKER
Prerequisite: Anthropology 3 or 3SS.
A history of the process of plant and animal domestication in the Americas,the Near East, Asia, and Africa. Course focuses on the specific biological changes in the major domesticates as well as associated social changes in human life.
ANTH 162G. Sacred Laws, Social Injustice: Caste in Indian Society
(4) ELISON
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing and completion of at least one upper-division Religious Studies or Anthropology course or permission of the instructor.
The reverse of the principle of Separate but Equal, caste implies Together but Unequal. This course stresses two aspects of caste hierarchy: 1) caste as lived in India; and 2) caste as conceived and reformed within Hindu thought. At the theoretical level, caste has inspired efforts to map social relations along multiple axes—power, purity, material exchange—in counterpoint to Western modernity. Along with the social theory, we'll read memoirs, ethnographic and sacred texts, as well as watch Bollywood movies.
ANTH 163. Archaeology of North America
(4) WILSON
A survey of North American archaeology exclusive of Mesoamerica. Changes inprehistoric lifeways from simple hunting and gathering to complex agriculturally based chiefdoms will be explored through the study of the developmentof regional traditions over long periods of time.
ANTH 164. The Origins of Complex Societies
(4) VANDERWARKER
Prerequisite: Anthropology 3 or 3SS.
Why and how complex societies developed from simple, egalitarian societies in some areas of the world. Course surveys major theories and evidence surrounding the origins of states and urban societies in New and Old World.
ANTH 167. People of the Ice Age
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Anthropology 3 or 3SS.
Human adaptations and population dispersals during the Ice Age (Pleistocene epoch). Course focuses on Stone Age cultures and the evidence for early human occupation of the Americas and the Old World between three million and 10,000 years ago.
ANTH 168. Ethnology in Rural California: Transformations in Agriculture, Farm Labor, and Rural Communities
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Anthropology 2; upper-division standing.
Provides a systematic review of research by anthropologists and other social scientists on the development of agriculture and its effects on ruralsociety. Special emphasis is given to the settlement of immigrant farm workers and the formation of new communities.
ANTH 168JH. Gauchos, Cowboys, and Indians
(4) HOELLE
Prerequisite: Environmental Studies 1 or 3 or Anthropology 2.
Enrollment Comments: Open to non-majors. Same Course as ENV S 168JH
Focuses on gauchos, cowboys, and indigenous groups, and their cultural practices in relation to the environment. The contrasting ways that they are represented in popular culture and debates about environmental sustainability is examined.
ANTH 169. Evolution of Cooperation
(4) GURVEN
Prerequisite: Anthropology 5 or 7.
Interdisciplinary focus on the emergence and maintenance of cooperation in human populations. Are we unique in our abilities to reap gains from cooperative endeavors? Why are some people generous, others stingy? How do propensities, personalities, ecology, and cultural institutions affect success incooperation?
ANTH 170. Behavioral Ecology of the Family
(4) LAWSON
Prerequisite: Anthropology 5
Considers diversity in human family structure and family relationships fromthe perspective of evolutionary anthropology. Topics include: kin selection and detection, sibling competition and family size, childhood and sexual maturity, parent- offspring conflict, sex roles, marriage and inheritance, parental investment strategies.
ANTH 171. Evolutionary Medicine
(4) GURVEN
Prerequisite: Anth 5 with a minimum grade of C; or, EEMB 2 and EEMB 3; or, MCDB 1 and MCDB 2.
Enrollment Comments: Open to non-majors.
Applies evolutionary principles to understanding human health and diseasepast and present. Topics include host/parasite co- evolution, aging and senescence, influence of human migration and culture on disease patterns, and evolutionary origins of “diseases of civilization."
ANTH 172. Colonialism and Culture
(4) HANCOCK
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Historical and socialcultural processes of colonialism and postcolonialism in selected societies. Topics include: relations between colonialism and capitalism; rise of nationalism; race and sexuality; cultural dimensions of and resistance to colonialism; modernization and development regimes; and postcolonial critique.
ANTH 176. Representations of Sexuality in Modern Japan
(4) FRUHSTUCK
Prerequisite: History 80 or 87 or Upper Division Standing
Enrollment Comments: Same course as History 188S and Japanese 162.
This course will cover the main ideologies guiding the establishment of various representations of sexuality from prewar scientific writings to contemporary popular culture.
ANTH 176B. The American West
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Any lower division History or Anthropology course or upper division standing.
The American West as a frontier and as a region, in transit from the Atlantic seaboard to the Pacific, and from the seventeenth century to the present.
ANTH 176TS. Ancient Egyptian Religion
(4) SMITH
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Examination of Ancient Egyptian religion from massive temples and pyramids to modest offerings and simple burials. The interaction of sacred and secular is considered through examination of the individual, society, and the state in shaping religious beliefs.
ANTH 177AB. Human Reproduction Ecology and Endocrinology
(4) BLACKWELL
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing
Recommended Preparation: Anthropology 5 or 7
Regulation of reproductive function by diet, energy balance, lactation, and social context. The role of hormones in the regulation of human reproduction, behavior, and physiology. Hormonal changes with parenting and pregnancy in men and women.
ANTH 178. Internship in Archaeological Record-Keeping and Collections
(1-4) GAMBLE
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 4 units.
Interns serve as assistants in the department's Central Coast InformationCenter or Repository for Archaeological Collections or both.
ANTH 180A. Osteology
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Designed to teach students in archaeology and physical anthropology the basic skills necessary to identify and analyze the remains of animals recovered from archaeological excavations. Emphasis is placed on laboratory work with actual archaeological collections and testing hypotheses about prehistoric human behavior.
ANTH 180B. Osteology
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Anthropology 180A; consent of instructor.
Continuation of Anthropology 180A with the development of a research project.
ANTH 181. Methods and Techniques of Field Archaeology
(4) GAMBLE
Prerequisite: Anthropology 3 or 3SS.
Recommended Preparation: Upper division courses in archaeology.
Introduction to archaeological research designs and field techniques of data collection, including survey, excavation, and site data recording. Coursework entails fieldwork all day Saturday.
ANTH 182. Quantitative Data Analysis in Archaeology
(4) VANDERWARKER
Prerequisite: Anthropology 3 or 3SS or 100.
This course is an introduction to the practical analysis of commonly encountered archaeological data using simple quantitative and statistical procedures such as exploratory data analysis, sampling, regression, and spatial analysis. The course is taught in a computer-assisted (mutimedia) format.
ANTH 182M. Introduction to Lithic Analysis
(4) WILSON
Prerequisite: Anthropology 3 or 3SS or 100.
This course gives students an introduction to the anthropology and archaeology of making and using stone tools. Practical experience in making tools and using them experimentally is emphasized.
ANTH 183. Internship in Archaeological Resource Management
(1-4) GAMBLE
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Recommended Preparation: Anthropology 181 or 191 depending on the nature of the internship.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 4 units.
Interns serve as assistants or trainees in the archaeological programs of agovernmental agency, a museum, or a private firm in the local area. In collaboration with the instructor and an extramural archaeologist, the student conceives a set of activities for the internship.
ANTH 184. Settlement Pattern Analysis in Archaeology
(4) SCHREIBER
Prerequisite: Anthropology 3; not open to freshmen.
Recommended Preparation: Upper-division courses in archaeology.
How the arrangement of archaeological sites across the landscape indicates aspects of human culture, including subsistence strategies and socio-political complexity. Methods of obtaining and interpreting settlement data.
ANTH 185. Human Environmental Rights
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Anthropology 2 or Environmental Studies 1 or 3.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Environmental Studies 185.
Introduction to human environmental rights. Examines the expansion of human rights to include human environmental rights, abuses of human environmental rights, associated social conflicts, and emergent social movements including environmental justice and transnational advocacy networks.
ANTH 186. Lab Course in Paleoethnobotany
(4) VANDERWARKER
Prerequisite: Anth 3
Enrollment Comments: Quarters usually offered: Winter, Spring.
Study of archaeological plant remains, including field/lab methodology, thereconstruction of ancient environment and the subsistence, spatial and temporal analysis, quantitative methods, and taxonomy. Divided between lecture, discussion, and labwork, involving microscopic identification of paleoethnobotanical remains.
ANTH 186Z. Lab Course in Zooarchaeology
(4) VANDERWARKER
Prerequisite: Anthropology 3
Study of archaeological faunal remains, including field/lab methodology, the reconstruction of ancient environment and the subsistence, spatial and temporal analysis, quantitative methods, and taxonomy. Divided between lecture, discussion, and labwork, involving identification of zooarchaeological remains.
ANTH 187. The Clash of Cultures
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Anthropology 2 and 3; or Anthropology 3SS.
A historical and anthropological survey of contact between Western civilization and non-Western societies from Medieval times up to the early twentieth century. Peoples covered include Khoi, Aztecs, Tahitians, Fuegians, Maori, and Northwest Indians.
ANTH 188. The Seacoast in Prehistory
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Anthropology 3 or 3SS.
An examination of maritime adaptations in world prehistory, emphasizing theintegration of marine resources into economies of varying degrees of complexity. Course will cover New and Old World culture areas and the Santa Barbara region.
ANTH 189. Problems in European Prehistory
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Anthropology 3 or 3SS.
Seminar in selected problems in the archaeology of Europe.
ANTH 190. Cultural Anthropology Internship
(1-4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 8 units but only 4 units may be applied to major.
Students serve as interns in various settings such as museums, governmental agencies, and health organizations to gain exposure to different cultures. In collaboration with the instructor and an extramural anthropologist, the student conceives a set of activities for the internship.
ANTH 191. Indigenous Movements in Asia
(4) LEWALLEN
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing
Enrollment Comments: Not open to student who have completed Japan 166. Same course as EACS 140.
Examines the emergence of indigenous peoples as a new kind of political community in Asia. Reading across ethnographic, historical, and politic-legal perspectives, we will explore the material and symbolic benefits of claiming to be indigenous in non-western contexts.
ANTH 192AB. Developmental Plasticity and Evolution
(4) BLACKWELL
Prerequisite: Anthropology 5 or 7 with a minimum grade of C or Ecology Evolution and Marine Biology (EEMB) 2 with a minimum grade of C.
Recommended Preparation: Preparation in evolution and basic biology.
Explores how organisms develop differently in different environments; howdevelopmental plasticity facilitates evolution; adaptive landscapes; genetic accommodation of phenotypic variation; reaction norms; variation and flexibility in immune function, growth, behavior. Emphasis on humans but with examples and applicability to other species.
ANTH 193A. Anthropology Capstone: Preparing for a Graduate Career in Anthropology
(2) STAFF
Prerequisite: Anthropology 2, Anthropology 3 or 3ss, and Anthropology 5
2-unit course for Anthropology majors (and minors) with upper-division standing, with a preference for seniors. The goal of this course is to guide students in choosing and applying to graduate programs.
ANTH 193B. Anthropology Capstone: Entering the Work Force with an Anthropology Degree
(2) STAFF
Prerequisite: Anthropology 2, Anthropology 3 or 3SS, and Anthropology 5.
2-unit course for Anthropology majors (and minors) with upper-division standing, with a preference for seniors. The goal of this course is to guide students in choosing and applying to jobs with a B.A. in Anthropology.
ANTH 194. Field Training Archaeology
(1-8) STAFF
Prerequisite: Anthropology 3 or 3SS; and, Anthropology 100.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 16 units, but only 8 units maybe applied toward the major
Introduction to design of research projects and techniques of data collection in archaeology. The number of units taken in one course will depend on the amount of training and experience received.
ANTH 194P. Practicum in Field and Laboratory Analysis
(1-4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Anthropology 100; consent of instructor.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit; however, only 6 units may be applied to Anthropology major requirements.
An applied course emphasizing acquisition of practical skills in archaeological field work and laboratory analysis. Projects will vary depending on the type of archaeological research in progress and may include artifact processing, cataloguing, field excavation and preparation of research results.
ANTH 195A. Senior Honors Program: Research Design
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Admission to senior honors program; consent of instructor.
Formal classroom seminar to prepare students for the ANTH 195B and 195C senior honors thesis sequence. This course guides students in formulatinga research problem that they will pursue in ANTH 195B and 195C, including planning a research agenda and conducting background research that will frame their senior thesis project. Project completion will be carried out independently during ANTH 195B and 195C.
ANTH 195B. Senior Honors Program: INDEPENDENT STUDY PART I
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Admission to senior honors program; consent of instructor; ANTH 195A
Independent research under the supervision of an anthropology faculty member which will result in senior thesis. This course concentrates on reading and gathering of materials for thesis.
ANTH 195C. Senior Honors Program: INDEPENDENT STUDY PART II
(4) STAFF
Recommended Preparation: Admission to senior honors program; consent of instructor; ANTH 195A and ANTH 195B
Independent research under the supervision of an anthropology faculty member which will result in senior thesis. Writing the thesis will be completed in this course. Final course in progress series.
ANTH 196. Archaeology of Religion
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Anthropology 3.
An analysis and survey of the ways in which archaeologists have approached religious beliefs and other intangibles in ancient societies. Emphasis on multidisciplinary perspectives, ethnographic analogy, and the impact of science on the study of ancient religion.
ANTH 197AAZZ. Special Courses
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated two times provided content is different.
Intensive studies or projects focused on special problems related to Anthropology which are not covered by other courses.
ANTH 197AC. Special Courses
ANTH 197DB. Special Courses
ANTH 197DK. Special Courses
ANTH 197DL. Special Courses
ANTH 197ER. Special Courses
ANTH 197ES. Special Courses
ANTH 197FS. Special Courses
ANTH 197JB. Special Courses
ANTH 197JH. Special Courses
ANTH 197LG. Special Courses
ANTH 197LS. Special Courses
ANTH 197MB. Special Courses
ANTH 197MK. Special Courses
ANTH 197MS. Special Courses
ANTH 197TP. Special Courses
ANTH 197XX. Special Courses
ANTH 197XY. Special Courses
ANTH 197XZ. Special Courses
ANTH 197ZZ. Special Courses
ANTH 198. Independent Readings in Anthropology
(1-5) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; completion of 2 upper-division courses in Anthropology.
Enrollment Comments: Students must have a minimum 3.0 GPA for the preceding 3 quarters and are limited to 5 units per quarter and 30 units total in all 98/99/198/199/199AA-ZZ courses combined. May be repeated to a maximum of 12 units in Anthropology.
Intended for students who know their own reading needs. Normally requires regular meeting with the instructor.
ANTH 199. Independent Studies in Anthropology
(1-5) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; completion of 2 upper-division courses in Anthropology.
Enrollment Comments: Students must have a minimum 3.0 GPA for the preceding 3 quarters and are limited to 5 units per quarter and 30 units total in all 98/99/198/199/199AA-ZZ courses combined. May be repeated to a maximum of 12 units in Anthropology.
Students must execute a limited research project on their own initiative.
ANTH 199RA. Undergraduate Research Assistance Training in Anthropology
(1-5) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; completion of 2 upper-division courses in Anthropology.
Enrollment Comments: Students must have a minimum 3.0 GPA for the preceding 3 quarters and are limited to 5 units per quarter and 30 units total in all 98/99/198/199/199AA-ZZ courses combined. May be repeated to maximum of 12 units.
Student gains research experience through assisting faculty member in research project.
Collapse Courses Graduate 
ANTH 201A. Classical Archaeological Theory
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Anthropology.
Enrollment Comments: Not open for credit to students who have completed Anthropology 201.
A survey and critique of archaeological theory from the nineteenth century through the 1970's, with emphasis on shifting paradigms and the implications for research.
ANTH 201B. Contemporary Archaeology Theory
(4) SCHREIBER
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in anthropology.
Enrollment Comments: Not open for credit to students who have completed Anthropology 201.
A survey and critique or archaeological theory from the 1980's to the present, emphasizing the diversity of new approaches and their implications for research.
ANTH 202. Advanced Topics in Primatology
(4) BROWN
Prerequisite: None, this is a graduate course.
Exploratory discussion of major topics in primate behavioral ecology, cognition and evolution.
ANTH 206AAZZ. Current Problems in Archaeology
(4) STAFF
Enrollment Comments: Course may be repeated for credit.
Critical examination of a selected aspect of contemporary archaeological research and theory. Topics will vary from year to year.
ANTH 206AV. Current Problems in Archaeology
ANTH 206DK. Current Problems in Archaeology
ANTH 206GW. Current Problems in Archaeology
ANTH 206KS. Current Problems in Archaeology
ANTH 206LG. Current Problems in Archaeology
ANTH 206SS. Current Problems in Archaeology
ANTH 207. Problems in Hunter-Gatherer Archaeology
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
A problem-oriented seminar focusing on major issues in the archaeology ofhunter-gatherers.
ANTH 208. Anthropological Political Economy
(4) WALSH
A Marxist perspective on topics such as: state formation, infrastructure,accumulation, neoliberalism, culture and class, land and labor, structureand process.
ANTH 209. Applying Evolutionary Anthropology
(4) LAWSON
Exploratory discussion of the potential of evolutionary anthropology to critique and inform the actions of the international development sector.
ANTH 210. Basic Issues in Physical Anthropology
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
A review of basic issues in physical anthropology for graduate students in archaeology.
ANTH 211. Religion and Ethnography: Theory, Praxis, Experience
(4) PEREZ
Enrollment Comments: Open to non-majors.
An introduction to the social scientific study of religion through the lensof the ethnographic method. Attends both to practical questions concerning the performance of qualitative research and to ethnography as a literary genre that captures the complexities of lived experience. Reading assignmentsmay be divided into three categories: historical investigations of ethnographic theory and fieldwork praxis; close examinations of discrete religious sites; and interdisciplinary meditations on such themes as interpretation, ethics, authority, and cultural translation.
ANTH 213. The Archaeology of Gender
(4) VANDERWARKER
Reviews gendered approaches to the past. We consider the development of this area of inquiry from the initial critiques concerning the invisibility of women in the past, to a consideration of gender as a relationship between men, women, children.
ANTH 214. The Origins and Intensification of Agriculture
(4) VANDERWARKER
Focuses on the origins and intensification of agriculture, by examining theshifts from foraging to farming to intensive food production. We consider issues of risk and uncertainty, timing relative to political complexity, population increase/nucleation, warfare, among other issues.
ANTH 215. Resource Intensification
(4) VANDERWARKER
This course considers the topic of resource intensification for foraging and agricultural societies.
ANTH 218. Problems in Andean Archaeology
(4) SCHREIBER
A problem-oriented approach to major issues in Andean archaeology. Focus ison the Middle Horizon of the Andean prehistory, especially the Wari and Tiwanaku cultures. Conducted on a seminar basis.
ANTH 219. Anthropology and Risk
(4) HARTHORN
Seminar will examine and discuss the uses of the concept of risk of anthropological, social and psychological theory and in case analyses of cultural values, environmental health and hazard, and illness and disease.
ANTH 222. Ethnicity and Race in the Americas
(4) SALDIVAR
Identifies different racial projects, of how "ethnicity" and "race" are understood in specific contexts. Special attention is put on the ideas of mestizaje, indigenismo and development, and the role that played in the racial projects of Latin America.
ANTH 225. Peasants and Industrialization: "Traditional" Rural Societies
(4) STAFF
The interaction between peasant and industrial socioeconomic formations is examined through three intellectual traditions: late nineteenth centuryMarxian writers, twentieth century development anthropologists, and proponents of the theory of the articulation of modes of production.
ANTH 226. Religion, Media, and Culture
(4) HANCOCK
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
Deals with the intersection of religion, culture and media in the context of contemporary, global transformations in religion. Topics may include indigenous media, televangelism, cyber-religion, new religious movements, proselytic media, neo-traditionalist fundamentalisms.
ANTH 228. Culture and Spatial Practice
(4) HANCOCK
Exploration of the sociocultural production of built form and the impact ofsocial space on human action. Readings drawn from cultural anthropology, cultural geography, art history, and social theory. Assessment based on weekly essays, participation, and final project.
ANTH 229. Ethnographic Research Methods: Ethics and Engagement
(4) LEWALLEN
Enrollment Comments: Concurrently offered with ANTH 129. Concurrent with ANTH 129. Graduate students will write a longer final research paper, hold additional meetings with the instructor, be required to go through the Human Subjects Review process for their research project, and give oral presentation of their research.
Repeat Comments: Topics vary; may be repeated for credit.
Interrogation of ethnographic research, its development and its ethical implications. Weighing approaches such as participatory action research, engaged and collaborative research, and decolonized methodologies, students will develop projects based on a critical reading of these models.
ANTH 232. Graduate Proseminar
(1) STAFF
Exposes all first and second year students to examples of current research in the different subfields of anthropology, to provide opportunities to meet with eminent scholars from other institutions, and to provide a forum forcollegial interactions among faculty members and graduate students.
ANTH 234. Advanced Theory and Method in Evolutionary Psychology
(4) TOOBY
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Interdepartmental research practicum in evolutionary psychology, biology, and anthropology for students and faculty planning or working on evolutionary research projects. Focus on experimental design, cross-cultural methods, organism design theory, new adaptationist hypotheses, and the criteria for testing them.
ANTH 235A. Foundations of Modern Social Theory
(4) STAFF
Seminar introduces major post-enlightenment debates on social life and modernity. Selections from Marx, Durkheim, Weber, Freud as well as major responses, revisions and critiques in critical and subaltern theory, cultural studies, structuralism and poststructuralism. Close readings of primary texts emphasized.
ANTH 235B. Issues in Contemporary Anthropology
(4) STAFF
Survey of major theoretical trends since the 1960's. Topics include: political economy and Marxism; evolution, history, and anthropology; symbolic anthropology; development studies; gender studies; colonialism and nationalism; structuralism/post-structuralism; modernity and post-modernity; ecological anthropology. Topics may vary with each professor.
ANTH 239A. Research Design and Writing in Archaeology
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in archaeology.
How to design a fieldwork project and write a dissertation research proposal; the search for funding agencies; how to deal with funding institutions, professional organizations, publishers and employers; issues of a career inanthropology.
ANTH 240A. Research Methods in Cultural Anthropology
(4) STAFF
Designed to give students a solid grounding in basic research methods in cultural anthropology. Focus on the role of fieldwork, preparation for field research (ethics, health, and gender), systematic data collection, qualitative data base management and analysis.
ANTH 240B. Research Design and Writing in Sociocultural Anthropology
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in sociocultural anthropology.
How to design a fieldwork project and write a dissertation research proposal; the search for funding agencies; how to deal with funding institutions, professional organizations, publishers and employers; issues of a career inanthropology.
ANTH 240C. Research Seminar in Cultural Anthropology
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
Required research and writing seminar during which second-year graduate students write individual MA papers.
ANTH 241. Contemporary Topics in Biological Anthropology
(1) TOOBY, GURVEN, GAULIN
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Anthropology or a related field.
Enrollment Comments: Quarters usually offered: Winter, Spring, Fall.
Read and discuss professional literature in biological anthropology and related fields: evolutionary and life history theory, human biology, paleoanthropology, biomedical science and primatology. Course keeps students abreastof key developments in the field.
ANTH 241A. Current Findings in Biological Anthropology
(2) STAFF
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing
Recommended Preparation: Significant knowledge of evolutionary theory
Open to graduate students in biological anthropology and allied fields, this course reviews research findings in human evolutionary studies.
ANTH 241B. Current Methods in Biological Anthropology
(2) STAFF
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing
Recommended Preparation: Significant knowledge of evolutionary theory
Open to graduate students in biological anthropology and allied fields, this course reviews research methods in human evolutionary studies.
ANTH 243. Archaeology of Warfare
(4) WILSON
A survey of archaeological research on the topic of interpersonal violence and warfare. Particular attention is given to the causes and consequences of warfare.
ANTH 244. Pedagogical Methods and Strategies in Biological Anthropology
(1) GAULIN
Primarily for graduate students in other subfields of anthropology, to help them master effective methods for teaching biological anthropology at the undergraduate level.
ANTH 245A. Quantitative Data Analysis Archaeology
(4) STAFF
This course is and introduction to the practical analysis of commonly-encountered archaeological data using simple quantitative and statistical procedures, such as exploratory data analysis, sampling, regression, and spatial analysis. The course is taught in a computer-assisted (multimedia) format.
ANTH 245B. Quantitative Data Analysis in Archaeology
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Anthropology 245A.
A working knowledge of quantitative methods that aid recognition of patterns in archaeological data; an understanding of the sorts of archaeological problems that can be attacked quantitatively; and experience in research designs which yield data that can be effectively analyzed.
ANTH 250AAZZ. Method and Theory in Anthropology
(4) STAFF
A discussion of general problems in anthropology. Consult with department office for faculty designation.
ANTH 250AB. Method and Theory in Anthropology
ANTH 250AJ. Method and Theory in Anthropology
ANTH 250AO. Method and Theory in Anthropology
ANTH 250BF. Method and Theory in Anthropology
ANTH 250BH. Method and Theory in Anthropology
ANTH 250BS. Method and Theory in Anthropology
ANTH 250CD. Method and Theory in Anthropology
ANTH 250CG. Method and Theory in Anthropology
ANTH 250CW. Method and Theory in Anthropology
ANTH 250CY. Method and Theory in Anthropology
ANTH 250DB. Method and Theory in Anthropology
ANTH 250DC. Method and Theory in Anthropology
ANTH 250DK. Method and Theory in Anthropology
ANTH 250DS. Method and Theory in Anthropology
ANTH 250EA. Method and Theory in Anthropology
ANTH 250EB. Method and Theory in Anthropology
ANTH 250EH. Method and Theory in Anthropology
ANTH 250FB. Method and Theory in Anthropology
ANTH 250FD. Method and Theory in Anthropology
ANTH 250FP. Method and Theory in Anthropology
ANTH 250GA. Method and Theory in Anthropology
ANTH 250GM. Method and Theory in Anthropology
ANTH 250GW. Method and Theory in Anthropology
ANTH 250JH. Method and Theory in Anthropology
ANTH 250JP. Method and Theory in Anthropology
ANTH 250JT. Method and Theory in Anthropology
ANTH 250KJ. Method and Theory in Anthropology
ANTH 250MB. Method and Theory in Anthropology
ANTH 250MC. Method and Theory in Anthropology
ANTH 250ME. Method and Theory in Anthropology
ANTH 250MG. Method and Theory in Anthropology
ANTH 250MH. Method and Theory in Anthropology
ANTH 250MJ. Method and Theory in Anthropology
ANTH 250MK. Method and Theory in Anthropology
ANTH 250ML. Method and Theory in Anthropology
ANTH 250MM. Method and Theory in Anthropology
ANTH 250MS. Method and Theory in Anthropology
ANTH 250MV. Method and Theory in Anthropology
ANTH 250MY. Method and Theory in Anthropology
ANTH 250NC. Method and Theory in Anthropology
ANTH 250NW. Method and Theory in Anthropology
ANTH 250PS. Method and Theory in Anthropology
ANTH 250PW. Method and Theory in Anthropology
ANTH 250RM. Method and Theory in Anthropology
ANTH 250SA. Method and Theory in Anthropology
ANTH 250SG. Method and Theory in Anthropology
ANTH 250SS. Methods and Theory in Antropology
ANTH 250TS. Method and Theory in Anthropology
ANTH 250VP. Method and Theory in Anthropology
ANTH 250XX. Method and Theory in Anthropology
ANTH 252. Political Ecology
(4) HOELLE
Study of human - environment interactions with attention to power, agency, and multi- scalar connections.
ANTH 253. Human Biology Laboratory Methods
(4) BLACKWELL
Enrollment Comments: Students must complete the one time UCSB EH&S Biosafety, Bloodborne Pathogens, and Medical Waste training before they can work in the lab. Contact instructor for training course information.
An introduction to the laboratory methods used in human biology for analyzing blood and saliva samples to determine levels of antibodies, hormones, and other biomarkers. The focus will be on hands-on training and troubleshooting assay problems.
ANTH 256. Modeling Social Behavior
(4) GURVEN
Mathematical models play a central role in the evolutionary study of socialbehavior, both in biology and the social sciences. This graduate seminar provides the rudiments of behavioral modeling using mathematics and evolutionary theory.
ANTH 257. Human Behavioral Ecology Theory and Method
(4) GURVEN
Prerequisite: Background in evolutionary theory.
Focuses on foraging, mate choice, parenting, life history, time use, cooperation, and culture by examining key articles, thereby providing an overviewof the major theoretical issues, methods, and data in human evolutionary ecology.
ANTH 260. Applied Data Analysis in R
(4) BLACKWELL
Prerequisite: Basic familiarity with R, familiarity with basic statistical methods, such as t-tests, linear models, ANOVA...
Graduate level workshop in data analysis using the R language. Focus is on practical applications to research questions, data management, and graphing. Topics vary by participants, but may include mixed models, non-linear modeling, graphing, scripting, manipulating data, etc.
ANTH 266. Theories of Mestizaje: Critical Perspectives from the Americas
(4) SALDIVAR
Mestizaje has been one of the longest racial projects in the American continent, both as a de facto phenomena and as an ideology. This course critically engages with contemporary debates. Explores Mestizaje as resistance, as well as domination.
ANTH 273. Archaeology of Identity
(4) SMITH
Ethnic categories, gender, age, status and other axes of differentiation are central to archaeological interpretation. This course will focus on recent approaches that emphasize identity as multi-scalar, multi-dimensional, situational and overlapping, constructed and negotiated by individuals in specific social contexts.
ANTH 275. Problems in Archaeological Ceramic Analysis
(4) STAFF
Current methods and techniques of ceramic analysis for graduate students. Covers both theoretical issues and data acquisition and analysis, including residue analysis.
ANTH 276. Culture Contact and Interaction
(4) SMITH
Examination of culture's role in human history, with an emphasis on how thecombination of archaeological, historical, ethnohistorical and ethnographicdata can yield insights into the dynamics of interactions between differentgroups at various times and places.
ANTH 277. Faculty Graduate Proseminar
(2) STAFF
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Anthropology.
Exposes incoming graduate students to the theoretical interests and current research being conducted by the department ladder and affiliated faculty. First-year students are required to enroll and participate fully in weekly meetings.
ANTH 501. Teaching Assistant Practicum
(4) STAFF
Enrollment Comments: Appointment as teaching assistant in anthropology. No unit credit allowed toward degree.
The course, designed to meet the needs of the graduate student who serves as a teaching assistant, includes analyses of texts and materials, discussion of teaching techniques, conducting discussion sections, formulation of topics and questions for papers and examinations, and grading papers and examinations under the supervision of the instructor assigned to the course.
ANTH 594. Field Research Training
(2-12) STAFF
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Enrollment Comments: (Possibly) offered concurrently with Anthropology 194.
Introduction to the planning and implementation of full-scale research projects. The opportunity will be given to formulate and carry out designs and to direct crews in data collection.
ANTH 596. Directed Reading and Research
(2-6) STAFF
Enrollment Comments: No more than half the graduate units necessary for the Master's degree may be taken in 596.
Individual tutorial.
ANTH 597. Individual Study for Master's Comprehensive Examinations
(2-6) STAFF
Enrollment Comments: No unit credit allowed toward degree.
Individual tutorial.
ANTH 598. Master's Thesis and Pre-Candidacy Preparation
(2-12) STAFF
Enrollment Comments: No credit allowed toward degree.
Individual tutorial for graduate students writing the research paper and/ordissertation proposal for advancement to candidacy.
ANTH 599. Dissertation Research and Preparation
(2-12) STAFF
Enrollment Comments: No unit credit allowed toward degree.
Individual tutorial.