UC Santa Barbara General CatalogUniversity of California, Santa Barbara

Comparative Literature

Division of Humanities and Fine Arts
Advising Office: Phelps Hall 4206
Administrative Office: Phelps Hall 5206
Telephone: (805) 893-3111

Undergraduate Advisor: Elizabeth Fair
Undergraduate e-mail: efair@hfa.ucsb.edu

Graduate Program Coordinator: Thomas Huff
Telephone: (805) 893-2131 
Graduate e-mail: thomashuff@ucsb.edu 

Website: www.complit.ucsb.edu
Program Chair: Catherine Nesci
E-mail: cnesci@frit.ucsb.edu


 

Some courses displayed may not be offered every year. For actual course offerings by quarter, please consult the Quarterly Class Search or GOLD (for current students). To see the historical record of when a particular course has been taught in the past, please visit the Course Enrollment Histories.

Comparative Literature
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Collapse Courses Lower DivisionĀ 
C LIT 27. Memory: Bridging the Humanities and Neurosciences
(3) KOSIK, JULLIEN
Enrollment Comments: Same course as French 40X and MCDB 27.
Neurosciences now ask some of the same profound questions posed by writers, artists and philosophers for centuries, thus opening surprising perspectives on memory and morality, dreams and perception, identity and agency. This course explores this emerging concordance.
C LIT 30A. Major Works in European Literature
(4) STAFF
A survey of European literature. Classical and medieval literature from Homer to Dante.
C LIT 30B. Major Works in European Literature
(4) STAFF
A survey of European literature. Renaissance and Neoclassical literature from Petrarch to Diderot.
C LIT 30C. Major Works in European Literature
(4) STAFF
A survey of European literature. Romantic and modern literature from Rousseau to Solzhenitsyn.
C LIT 30H. Honors Section
(1) STAFF
Prerequisite: Honors standing.
Seminar course for honors students enrolled in Comparative Literature 30 designed to enrich the large lecture experience and to supplement the weekly seminar meetings. May include additional readings, more intensive study of syllabus selections, and supplemental writings.
C LIT 31. Major Works of Asian Literatures
(4) STAFF
An introduction to the diverse literary traditions of Asia through an examination of selected works. Regional focus on East, South, and SoutheastAsia varies.
C LIT 32. Major Works of Middle Eastern Literatures
(4) STAFF
An introduction to the diverse literary traditions of the Middle East through an examination of selected works. Regional focus on North Africa, the Middle East, and Central Asia varies.
C LIT 33. Major Works of African Literatures
(4) STRONGMAN, AKUDINOBI
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Black Studies 33.
An introduction to the diverse literary traditions of Africa through an examination of selected works. Regional focus on North, West, East, Central, and South Africa varies.
C LIT 34. Literature of the Americas
(4) STAFF
An introduction to the diverse literary traditions of the Americas through an examination of selected works. Regional focus on North America, the Caribbean, and Latin America varies.
C LIT 35. The Making of the Modern World
(4) KITTLER
Description and analysis of decisive events contributing to the world we are inhabiting. Various themes presented: City planning, war and industrial warfare, technology and media-technology, ideologies of modernity, and modern master theories.
C LIT 36. Global Humanities
(4) WEBER, CARLSON
Enrollment Comments: Same course as English 36
Repeat Comments: Not open for credits to students who have completed English 36
What do literature and critical theory contribute to the reflection on human rights and the analysis of their violation? Inquiry into different ways in which the humanities can re-frame the debate on human rights and act as a social force.
C LIT 50A. Tales of Love in the Western Tradition
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Writing 2.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as French 50AX.
A comparative and interdisciplinary approach to the literatures and philosophies of love, desire, and sexuality in the western world, in antiquity, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance. In English.
C LIT 50B. Tales of Love in the Western Tradition
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Writing 2.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as French 50BX.
A comparative and interdisciplinary approach to the literatures and philosophies of love, desire, and sexuality in the western world in the 17th and 18th centuries. In English.
C LIT 50C. Tales of Love in the Western Tradition
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Writing 2.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as French 50CX.
A comparative and interdisciplinary approach to the literatures and philosophies of love, desire, and sexuality in the western world in the 19th and 20th centuries. In English.
C LIT 50H. Tales of Love Honors
(1) BROWN, NESCI, STAFF
Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Comparative Literature 50A or 50B or 50C; honors students only; consent of instructor.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as French 50H.
Repeat Comments: May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 3 units if student enrolls in Comparative Literature 50A, 50B, and 50C.
Eligible students are invited to enroll in the honors seminar, which is generally taught by the course instructor.
C LIT 99. Independent Study
(1-4) STAFF
Prerequisite: 8 units from any Comparative Literature courses numbered 30 to 36; minimum 3.0 cumulative GPA; consent of instructor and department.
Enrollment Comments: Students must have a cumulative 3.0 for the proceeding 3 quarter(s). Students must have a 3.0 GPA for the preceding 3 quarters and are limited to 30 units total in all 99/199 courses combined.
Independent research under the guidance of a faculty member in the program. Course offers motivated students the opportunity to undertake independent research or work in a research group.
Collapse Courses Upper DivisionĀ 
C LIT 100. Introduction to Comparative Literature
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Focus on various practices and methodologies of Comparative Literature as a cross-disciplinary and transnational endeavor, including recent developments and debates on translation studies and world literature in an era of cultural globalization. Content will vary with instructor.
C LIT 101. Introduction to Literary and Critical Theory
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper division standing.
How does critical theory help us to read and write literature? Potential foci include structuralism, semiotics, social theory, psychoanalysis, deconstruction, cultural criticism, gender studies and feminism, queer studies, postcolonial criticism, ecocriticism. Content will vary with instructor.
C LIT 102A. Introduction to Translation I
(4) ALVES FERREIRA
Prerequisite: Spanish 25 OR Spanish 16B.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Spanish 115.
Comprises topics necessary to develop skills that are needed for writing at a specialized level and to carry out written translation into and from Spanish, mostly texts on business and medical topics.
C LIT 102B. Introduction to Interpreting
(4) ALVES FERREIRA
Prerequisite: Spanish 25 OR Spanish 16B (may be taken concurrently).
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Spanish 116.
Comprised of topics necessary in developing skills for interpretation to and from Spanish. Intended mostly for proficient Spanish-language speakers.
C LIT 102C. Specialized Translation - Technical
(4) MIGLIO
Prerequisite: Spanish 115 or Comparative Literature 102A.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Spanish 117C.
Comprised of topics necessary in developing skills for writing at a specialized level, and with specialized vocabulary and format, for the translation of different types of technical texts (instruction manuals, medical, patents, etc.).
C LIT 103. Going Postal: Epistolary Narratives
(4) COOK
Prerequisite: Writing 2 or 50 or 109 or English 10 or upper-division standing
Repeat Comments: Same course as ENGL 128EN.
Investigates reappearance of the letter-novel at particular historical moments, and paradoxes built into the letter-form itself. Range of works emphasizing eighteenth- and later twentieth-century novels, likely works by Austen, Goethe, Hoffman, James, Montesquieu, Choderlos de Laclos, Lydia Davis, Pynchon.
C LIT 107. Voyages to the Unknown
(4) SKENAZI
Prerequisite: Writing 2 or equivalent.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as French 154A.
The impact of the voyages of discovery on late 15th and 16th century Europe. Readings on real and imaginary voyages: Columbus, Cartier, Lery, More, Rabelais, Montaigne.
C LIT 109. Game and Literature
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
An interdisciplinary inquiry into the motive of game in 18th-20th century literature. Focus is on the moral, psychological and epistemological dimensions of game according to both form and function. Considerations of the stylistic, narrative and rhetorical components of texts.
C LIT 111. Dreaming in Cultural Context
(4) PLANE
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Enrollment Comments: Concurrently offered with HIST 101D. Same course as History 101D
Explores dreams and dreaming in multiple historical and cultural contexts and pays particular attention to dreams and dream reports as unconscious and intra-psychic as well as social and cultural communications. A variety of historical, ethnographic, psychoanalytic, and literary texts are considered.
C LIT 113. Trauma, Memory, Historiography
(4) DERWIN, WEBER
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit up to a maximum of 8 units with consent of department chair.
How do individuals, communities, cultures, nations remember and/or forget, preserve and/or erase, traumatic events?
C LIT 119. Psychoanalytic Theory
(4) DERWIN, WEBER, FRADENBURG
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 8 units with consent of department chair.
Topic to be addressed each quarter will be chosen from the following: origins of psychoanalysis; sado-masochism; the death-drive; psychoanalysis and the law; group psychology; psychoanalysis and the media; literature andpsychoanalysis.
C LIT 121. What is a Hero?
(4) JULLIEN
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Focus on the idea of heroes and heroism in the Western tradition through readings of the three major epics of Greek and Latin Antiquity (the Iliad, the Odyssey, and the Aeneid), along with selections from modern variations on these old stories.
C LIT 122A. Representations of the Holocaust
(4) DERWIN
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Enrollment Comments: Not open for credit to students who have completed German 116A.
Close reading of post-Holocaust literature. Taught in English.
C LIT 126. Comparative Black Literatures
(4) STRONGMAN
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Black Studies 126.
Using a social constructionist approach to race, this course examines the multiple ways in which racial discourses operate in global literary cultures. It emphasizes that blackness need not be a homogeneous concept in order to continue to be a powerful agent in the postmodern world.
C LIT 128A. Children's Literature
(4) SNYDER
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Classic texts and theories of children's literature, from Perrault and Wilde to Freud and Propp. Examination of narrative and ideological strategies for constructing and representing "childhood" in modernity, with emphasis on their relationship to the family and the marketplace.
C LIT 129. Theory and Text: Representations of the Self in the Renaissance
(4) SKENAZI
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
An examination of representations of the self in Renaissance literature and culture. Readings will include works by Petrarch, Shakespeare, Castiglione, Montaigne, Quevedo, and theoretical texts by Foucault, Greenblatt, Eakin.
C LIT 133. Transpacific Literature
(4) HUANG
Prerequisite: Writing 2 or upper-division standing.
Repeat Comments: Same course as English 133TL.
Looks at the Pacific as the primary location for literary and historical imagination since the Age of Exploration. Studies the crisscross, transpacific field of inscriptions ranging from Captain Cook to Herman Melville, Mark Twain, Jack London,and Maxine Hong Kingston.
C LIT 139. China in Translation: Theory, Art, History
(4) MAZANEC
Prerequisite: Upper Division Standing
Uses the case study of translations into and out of China- long regarded as a civilization distinct from west- to explore themes in translation studies. Topics: ideograms, orientalism, modernization, world literature, annotations, musicality, poetic license, adaption.
C LIT 147A. Language and Knowledge in Medieval Islam
(4) EL OMARI
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing
Examines representative conceptions and practices of language in Islamic thought and history. Questions addressed in this course range from conceptions of language in exegetical, theological, mystical, and legal traditions to its practices in writing and transmission of knowledge.
C LIT 147B. The Culture of Medieval Muslim Spain
(4) REYNOLDS
Prerequisite: Upper Division Standing
Examines the emergence and spread of a distinctive culture in medieval Muslim Spain (Ar. al-Andalus) from the 8th to the early 17th centuries. Topics include literature, music, architecture, and mysticism, as well as intellectual fields such as philosophy and the sciences. These fields will be examined against the background of cultural interactions among both ethnic (e.g., Arab, Berber, Iberian) and sectarian (e.g., Christian, Jewish, Muslim) communities. Hotly debated issues such as cultural influence and modern survivals will also be addressed.
C LIT 148. Creative Chaos
(4) HOLLAND
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Chaos: is it primordial mahem and confusion? Or does chaos permit the possibility of form and creativity? Course explores the order and disorder of chaos within literary, scientific, and philosophical narratives. From Hesiod and Ovid through Diderot, Wordsworth, and Pynchon.
C LIT 153. Border Narratives
(4) GUTIERREZ-JONES
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Examination of novels, short stories, and films that engage U.S./Mexico border dynamics. Considering the ways diverse, interactive processes are affecting border culture, and inquiring into the ways cultural products critically respond to these processes.
C LIT 154. Science Fiction in Eastern Europe
(4) MCCLAIN
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Slavic 154.
The genre of science fiction and its development in literature and film in the various cultures of eastern europe. Topics include utopia, dystopia,technology, the "mad" scientist, etc. Taught in English.
C LIT 158. True to Life: The "Natural" Novels of Natsume Soseki and Henry James
(4) NATHAN
Prerequisite: Upper Division Standing
Close reading and succinct analysis of works by Natsume Soseki and Henry James. Class discussion will be propelled by student's brief (500 words) "impressions" of a scene or moment minutely observed. Critical focus: discerning respective approaches to story-telling as a means of revealing character.
C LIT 161. Literature of Central Europe
(4) SPIEKER
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as German 151C and Slavic 151C.
Investigation of the prolific literatures of central Europe, one of the culturally and linguistically most diverse regions of the European continent that has produced writers such as Italo Svevo, Franz Kafka, Robert Musil, Bruno Schultz, and others. Readings in English.
C LIT 162. Sexuality and Globalization
(4) AMAR
Examines globalizing cultural politics of sexuality through literature, popular media, subaltern performances, and press discourse from Global South; engages questions of "universalized" LGBTQ identities, Islamic law and sexual rights, militarized masculinities, recognition of transexualities, and queer, anti-racist and feminist globalisms.
C LIT 162I. Desire, Sex, and Romance in Traditions of India
(4) ELISON
Prerequisite: Upper Division standing and one course from the following: RGST 19, 20, 140D, 158C, 159 G-H-J-K-L-M-N-O, 160A, 161D, 169 or equivalent; or instructor approval.
Enrollment Comments: Cross listed with Religious Studies 162I.
Explores questions of love and sex across two thousand years of Indian religious thought. The reading list includes some of the most famous voices in South Asian literary history. We will tour various genres: moral teachings, epic narrative, drama, devotional and mystical poetry, and modern fiction. Yes, we will read the Kama Sutra, and yes, there will be Bollywood films.
C LIT 164D. Russian Cosmism
(4) SPIEKER
Prerequisite: Upper division standing.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Slavic 164D.
A focus on fictional and non-fictional texts, films, and art centered on the Russian fascination with outer space, science, and technology, from the 19th century to the present day. Russian Cosmism opens up new perspectives on Russian 19th century philosophy as well as the Russian avant-garde and present-day ideology and politics in Russia. Artists and thinkers considered include A. Bogdanov, N. Federov, K. Malevich, A. Tarkovsky, and many others.
C LIT 165. East Asian Buddhist Poetry
(4) MAZANEC
Prerequisite: Upper Division Standing
Introduces Buddhist poetry of China, Japan, and Korea. Emphasizes the diversity of literary encounters with the teachings and practices of Buddhism. Topics include Hanshan, Basho, Zen koans, Gary Snyder, and monastery cats.
C LIT 170. The Art of Translation
(4) LEVINE
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; and completion of quarter 5 or equivalent of the language of study.
The course aims to develop skills in terminology and technologies of translation; it also examines the practical and theoretical issues pertaining to translation as an artistic, cultural, and ethical process. Focus on literary translation as creative research and practice.
C LIT 171. Post-Colonial Cultures
(4) PRIETO
Enrollment Comments: Same course as French 154G.
Study of fiction from the Caribbean, West Africa, and the Maghreb. Born of the conflict between and hybridization of widely differing cultural traditions, this course provides insights into the vibrancy of contemporary post-colonial societies, the ongoing legacy of colonialism, and the meaning of multiculturalism. In English.
C LIT 174. Metamorphosis
(4) HOLLAND
Narratives of metamorphosis challenge our preconceived notions of identity and form. This course investigates metamorphosis as a scientific, social, and philosophical problem, drawing from literature (Ovid, Stevenson, Kafka, Cortazar, etc.) and the visual arts, including film.
C LIT 179A. Revolutions: Marx, Nietzsche, Freud
(4) WEBER
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as German 179A.
Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud have revolutionized our world: Marx, the political and economic landscape; Nietzsche, the realm of philosophy and literature; and Freud, the way we think of our mind, sexualities, wishes and dreams. Explorations of three revolutionary challenges.
C LIT 179B. Mysticism
(4) WEBER
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Enrollment Comments: Not open for credit to students who have completed German 169. Same course as German 179B.
Analysis of German mystical writing, its roots in ancient Greek texts, revolutionary impact, links with other mystical traditions, and influence on secular literature. Texts include Hildegard von Bingen, Meister Eckhart, Mechthild von Magdeburg, Novalis, Rilke, etc. Taught in English.
C LIT 179C. Mediatechnology
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Enrollment Comments: Not open for credit to students who have completed German 180. Same course as German 179C.
Telegraph, telephone, phonograph, and film are techniques that have engendered new forms of representation, communication, and thinking. Course studies the impact of these transformations in literature and on literature. Taught in English.
C LIT 180. The European Renaissance
(4) SKENAZI
Prerequisite: Writing 2 and 50; or Writing 109AA-ZZ or English 10.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as English 144.
The generic forms of cultural issues characteristic of early modern European poetry, fiction, and drama. Such authors as Petrarch, Boccaccio, More, Rabelais, Ariosto, Montaigne, Camoes, Shakespeare, Lope de Vega, and Cervantes.
C LIT 184A. From Superman to Spiegelman: The Jewish Graphic Novel
(4) AMIHAY
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as RG ST 133B.
This survey of graphic novels by Jewish authors will include selections of early comics, works by American authors such as Eisner, Spiegelman, and Pekar, and Israeli graphic novels. The seminar-style discussions will address varied themes, including identity, gender, trauma and memory.
C LIT 184B. Photography and Religion
(4) AMIHAY, O.
Prerequisite: Upper Division standing.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as RG ST 110G.
Offers an examination of the relationship between religion and photography through history, based on the consideration of photography as both an artistic medium and a social and performative practice. Alongside analysis of the function of photographs in religious life, we will explore various religious concepts in association with photography. Through meditations on topics as spirit, death, ritual, iconicity, sacred space, and gender, students will become familiar with critical theory of photography, visual analysis, and landmark photographs.
C LIT 184C. Introduction to Modern Hebrew Literature
(4) AMIHAY, O.
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Religious Studies 133E.
This seminar offers a broad view of Modern Hebrew literature, from its emergence in the late nineteenth century to the present. Explores literary reflections of the Zionist project and major trends in Israeli culture and politics, while examining connections and tensions between different literary generations in Israel. Readings will include selections from Israeli novels, short stories, poetry and drama in translation but will be available in Hebrew for interested students. Discussions held in English.
C LIT 186AAZZ. Interdisciplinary Comparative Literature Studies
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 12 units provided letter designations are different.
Interdisciplinary examination of selected topics, theories, disciplinary issues, and/or methodological questions in the combined study of literature, and other areas of the humanities and humanistic sciences. Course focus will be determined by the instructor(s).
C LIT 186AA. Interdisciplinary Comparative Literature Studies
C LIT 186AD. Adultery in the Novel
C LIT 186BB. The Aftermath of Enlightenment
C LIT 186CC. Interdisciplinary Comparative Literature Studies
C LIT 186DD. Interdisciplinary Comparative Literature Studies
C LIT 186DF. Documentary Filmmaking & Democracy
C LIT 186EE. Interdisciplinary Comparative Literature Studies
C LIT 186FF. NOIR: 1940's Film and Fiction
C LIT 186FL. Vegetarianism: Food, Literature, Philosophy
C LIT 186FR. Interdisciplinary Comparative Literature Studies
C LIT 186FW. Iceland's Folklore and Witchcraft
C LIT 186GG. Interdisciplinary Comparative Literature Studies
C LIT 186HH. Interdisciplinary Comparative Literature Studies
C LIT 186II. Women and Revolution 1790s and 1960s
C LIT 186JJ. Literatures in the Juvenile Justice System - Theory into Practice
C LIT 186LF. Legal Fictions
C LIT 186LJ. Literary Journalism
C LIT 186ML. Iceland's Medieval Literature: Eddas and Sagas
C LIT 186NA. Interdisciplinary Comparative Literature Studies
C LIT 186PL. Introduction to the Philosophy of Literature
C LIT 186PP. Poetry & Community Practice
C LIT 186TT. Interdisciplinary Comparative Literature Studies
C LIT 186WL. Wild Literature in the Urban Landscape
C LIT 186YY. Interdisciplinary Comparative Literature Studies
C LIT 188. Narrative Studies
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Study of various narrative forms, e.g., novel, short story, essay, memoir, with a specific focus each quarter. Topics to be addressed may include strategies of narration, the history of particular narrative forms, what is meant by literary style.
C LIT 189. Narrative in the First Person
(4) STAFF
Repeat Comments: Can only be repeated if being offered by a different instructor.
Autobiography, memoir, lyric, testimony & many fictional works are written in the first-person. This course considers the relationship between first-person narrators, their audiences, and the worlds from which these narrators emerge. Texts and course focus vary with the instructor.
C LIT 191. Fantasy and the Fantastic
(4) JULLIEN
Enrollment Comments: Same course as French 153D.
Course explores the creation of a space where a fantastic perception of reality developed and thrived, hesitating between the real and the supernatural, in the intermediate space of the unexplained and unexplainable. Works by Balzac, Poe, Stevenson, James, and Borges.
C LIT 192AAZZ. Special Topics course in Comparative Literature
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: UPPER-DIVISION STANDING. MAY BE REPEATED FOR CREDIT TO A MAXIMUM OF 12 UNITS
C LIT 192CA. Cognitive Approaches to World Literature
C LIT 192EO. Special Topics course in Comparative Literature
C LIT 192RH. Special Topics course in Comparative Literature
C LIT 192W. Special Topics course in Comparative Literature
C LIT 193. Research in Translation Studies
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Comparative Literature 170.
Enrollment Comments: This course will not be applied to the Comparative Literature major or minor requirements.
Individualized instruction to complete the capstone translation project for the Minor in Translation Studies. To be completed with the faculty advisor from the language department of the student's focus.
C LIT 194I. Internship
(1-4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; Comparative Literature majors only; consent of department.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 units, but only 4 units may be applied to the major.
Under supervision of Comparative Literature faculty, Comparative Literature majors may obtain credit for work without pay in publishing, editing, journalism, or other employment related to Comparative Literature, World Literature, and/or Translation Studies. Requirements include work hours, regular meetings with professor-mentor, and a final paper presenting and analyzing the student's learning from the internship pertaining to specialization in world literary studies.
C LIT 195. Junior/Senior Seminar
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Selected methodological issues in comparative literature. Topics vary with each instructor.
C LIT 197. Upper Division Special Topics
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 12 units.
Content will vary with each instructor.
C LIT 198. Junior/Senior Seminar
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Repeat Comments: Same course as Comparative Literature 195
Selected methodological issues in comparative literature. Topics vary with each instructor.
C LIT 198H. Senior Honors Seminar
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor; honors standing.
This seminar is concurrently offered with graduate seminars. It is designed to expand research skills through an investigation of theoretical issues and readings of both literary and critical texts. It involves extensive research, sophisticated analysis, and creative reflection.
C LIT 199. Independent Studies in Comparative Literature
(1-5) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; completion of 2 upper-division courses in Comparative Literature.
Enrollment Comments: Students must have a cumulative 3.0 for the proceeding 3 quarter(s). Students are limited to 5 units per quarter and 30 units total in all 98/99/198/199/199AA-ZZ courses combined. Comparative Literature 199 may be repeated for credit to a maximum of 30 units, but only 12 units may be applied toward the major.
Independent studies with any faculty member. To permit study of a subject desired by the student but not covered in course offerings.
Collapse Courses GraduateĀ 
C LIT 200. Seminar in Comparative Literature
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
Addresses issues of methodology and literary theory. Specific authors and topics vary from class to class.
C LIT 210. Proseminar in Comparative Literature
(4) STAFF
Repeat Comments: Instructor approval required for repetition of course.
Addresses topics relevant to comparative literary study,including scholarly approaches and practices, the discipline of comparative literature broadly conceived, and the specific resources and intellectual culture of UCSB. Course format will range from seminar style discussions, workshops, and formal presentations.
C LIT 220. Critical Approaches to Comparative & World Literature
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
Explores current inquiries in literary, critical, and cognitive theories in world literatures, including the insights from transnational, intercultural, and intermedial perspectives. Topic and content will vary according to instructor.
C LIT 236. Media History Theory
(4) WARNER
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
Interweaves a study of the emergence of several kinds of twentieth century media including radio, film, television, and the internet, with keytexts of media theory including Benjamin, Adorno, MdLuhan, Debord, Hall, and others.
C LIT 249. Music and Literature
(4) STAFF
Study of interrelations of music and literature, with emphasis on modernist interest in using principles from one art to guide creation in the other. Literary texts from Symbolists to Beckett and Burgess; theory: Aristotle to Adorno; music: from Wagner to S. Reich.
C LIT 253. Techno Theory
(4) KITTLER, MALEURVE, RICKELS
With the advent of the new media technologies and the "new" discourse on technology associated with Freud and Heidegger, critical discourse has finally met its match and maker in the machine.
C LIT 260. Literary Translation: Theory and Practice
(4) LEVINE
Examination of translation and the canon, questioning the hierarchical division between translation and original, illustrating the concept of the original as translation and the literary text as "work-in-progress" in which translation forms part of the creative process.
C LIT 279. Contemporary Theory in Translation
(4) SNYDER
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
Survey of the principal issues of contemporary theory. Readings range from classic texts by Adorno, Bakhtin, Benjamin, Cixous, Foucault, Heidegger et al. to recent essays in the new cultural studies. In English.
C LIT 591. Teaching Assistant Practicum
(4) STAFF
Enrollment Comments: Units earned do not apply toward completion of advanced degrees.
Supervised teaching of lower-division comparative literature courses at UCSB. Participation in occasional workshops related to the field of teaching will be required.
C LIT 592. Academic Presentation and Writing in World Literature
(1-12) STAFF
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
Focus on presentations at scholarly meetings and writing for publication in scholarly journals in comparative/world literature. Individualized meetings or small-group workshop format.
C LIT 594. Special Topics
(1-4) STAFF
A special seminar on research subjects of current interest.
C LIT 595. Doctoral Colloquium
(1) STAFF
Prerequisite: Graduate Students Only
Seminar provides support for graduate students when developing their dissertation prospectus and focuses on research in the literary humanities at a practical level.
C LIT 596. Directed Reading and Research
(2-18) STAFF
Prerequisite: Minimum of two units per quarter. Letter grade only.
Enrollment Comments: No more than half of units required for M.A. may be taken in 596 series.
Individual tutorial. A written proposal for each tutorial must be approved by the program chair.
C LIT 596TS. Translation Studies Independent Studies
(4-8) STAFF
Prerequisite: Comparative Literature 260 or approval of the emphasis adviser.
Repeat Comments: Minimum of four units per quarter.
Individual reading and research. A written proposal for each tutorial must be approved by the faculty emphasis adviser.
C LIT 597. Individual study for M.A. Comprehensive and Ph.D. Exams
(1-12) STAFF
Enrollment Comments: No unit credit allowed toward advanced degree. Enrollment limited to 24 uniunits per examination (12 units maximum in any one examination quarter). S/U grading only.
For individual study with major professor or chair or director of student'sprogram.
C LIT 598. Master's Thesis Research and Preparation
(2-12) STAFF
Enrollment Comments: No unit credit allowed toward advanced degree. S/U grading only.
For research and writing of the master's thesis.
C LIT 599. Ph.D. Dissertation Research and Preparation
(2-12) STAFF
Enrollment Comments: S/U grading only. Twelve units maximum.
For research and writing of the doctoral dissertation. Instructor should be chair of the student's doctoral committee.