UC Santa Barbara General CatalogUniversity of California, Santa Barbara

English

Division of Humanities and Fine Arts
South Hall 2500-2700 (Faculty Offices and Research Centers)
South Hall 3400 Suite (Advising & Administrative Offices)
Telephone: (805) 893-7488
E-mail: englishinfo@english.ucsb.edu
Website: www.english.ucsb.edu
Department Chair: Elizabeth Heckendorn Cook

 


 

Some courses displayed may not be offered every year. For actual course offerings by quarter, please consult the Quarterly Class Search or GOLD (for current students). To see the historical record of when a particular course has been taught in the past, please visit the Course Enrollment Histories.

English
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Collapse Courses Lower Division 
ENGL 10. Introduction to Literary Study
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Writing 2.
Enrollment Comments: Course recommended as alternative to Writing 50 or 109 for students who plan to major in English or literary study. Not open for credit to students who have completed English 10AC, 10EM, or 10LC.
Acquaints students with purposes and tools of literary interpretation. Introduces techniques and vocabulary of analytic discussion and critical writing. Some emphasis on poetry with attention also to drama, essay, and the novel.
ENGL 10EM. Introduction to Literary Study - Exploring Early Modern Studies
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Writing 2.
Enrollment Comments: Course recommended as alternative to Writing 50 or 109 for students who plan to major in English or literary study. Not open for credit to students who have completed English 10, 10AC, or 10LC.
Acquaints students with purposes and tools of literary interpretation. Introduces techniques and vocabulary of analytic discussion and critical writing. Emphasis is on early modern studies. The class also introduces students to the Early Modern Center located within the English Department.
ENGL 10LC. Introduction to Literary Study - Exploring Literature and the Culture of Information
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Writing 2.
Enrollment Comments: Course recommended as alternative to Writing 50 or 109 for students who plan to major in English or literary study. Not open for credit to students who have completed English 10, 10AC, or 10EM.
Acquaints students with purposes and tools of literary interpretation. Introduces techniques and vocabulary of analytic discussion and critical writing. Emphasis is on literature and the culture of information. Introduces students to the Transcriptions Project located within the English Department.
ENGL 10S. Seminar for Introduction to Literature
(1) STAFF
Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in English 10; consent of instructor.
A seminar course for a select number of students enrolled in English 10 designed to enrich the large lecture experience for the motivated student. Course will include either supplementary readings or more intensive study of the English 10 reading list, as well as supplemental writing.
ENGL 11. Literature and its Uses
(4) STAFF
Introduces students to literary study?s unique perspectives on social knowledge, public issues, ethics, and global developments. Special emphasis on how literary practice serves as a gateway to the professions, including writing, teaching, law, journalism, counseling, business, medicine, and technological fields.
ENGL 15. Introduction to Shakespeare
(4) STAFF
Introduction to Shakespeare in which a number of major plays are read with close attention to language, dramatic structure, and historical context.
ENGL 15S. Seminar on Shakespeare
(1) STAFF
Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in English 15; consent of instructor.
Seminar course for a select number of students enrolled in English 15 designed to enrich the large lecture experience for the motivated student. Course includes either supplementary reading or more intensive study of the English 15 reading list, as well as supplemental writing.
ENGL 18. Public Speaking
(4) ENDERS
Enrollment Comments: This course will not count toward the English major or minor requirements.
Practical and historical introduction to public speaking in context (e.g., legal, political, professional). Focuses on critical rhetorical analysis of speeches. Students write and deliver original speeches while offering feedback on those of their peers. Students also write an analytical essay.
ENGL 22. Literature and the Environment
(4) STAFF
Enrollment Comments: Not open for credit to students who have completed English 122LE or Environmental Studies 122LE.
Beginning with "The Epic of Gilgamesh", one of the West?s earliest texts, this course surveys nearly 5000 years of literature in order to explore the literary history of the relationship we have with our planet, as well as to better understand our current environmental beliefs.
ENGL 22S. Seminar on Literature and the Environment
(1) STAFF
Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in English 22; consent of instructor.
Seminar course for a select number of students enrolled in English 22 designed to enrich the large lecture experience for the motivated student. Course includes either supplementary reading or more intensive study of the English 22 reading list, as well as supplemental writing.
ENGL 23. The Climate Crisis: What It Is And What Each of Us Can Do About It
(4) HILTNER
Employing a cultural approach, this course explores why our climate is changing and what each of us can do about it. Considers issues such as housing, transportation, diet, consumer products, as well as different forms of climate activism.
ENGL 23S. Seminar on the Climate Crisis
(1) STAFF
Seminar course for a select number of students enrolled in English 23 designed to enrich the large lecture experience for the motivated student. Course includes either supplementary reading or more intensive study of the English 23 reading list, as well as supplemental writing.
ENGL 24. The Short Story: Reading Mysteries and Mysteries of Reading
(4) STAFF
Enrollment Comments: Open to non-majors.
Focusing primarily on reading, this course is dedicated to understanding the crucial, pleasurable, and troubling genre of the short story. Central to our discussion will be the idea that all acts of reading are attempts to solve a mystery, and texts will come primarily from the American canon.
ENGL 24G. Ghosts of the Gothic
(4) STAFF
Enrollment Comments: Open to non-majors.
Reading short fiction: the tale, ghost story, and even Freud's case studies, "Ghosts of the Gothic" maps the popular narrative obsession with the unknown in works by Austen, James, Poe, Chesnutt, and others.
ENGL 24GS. Seminar on Ghosts of the Gothic
(1) STAFF
Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in English 24G; consent of instructor.
Seminar course for a select number of students enrolled in English 24G designed to enrich the large lecture experience for the motivated student. Course includes either supplementary reading or more intensive study of the English 24G reading list, as well as supplemental writing.
ENGL 24S. Seminar on Short Stories
(1) STAFF
Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in English 24; consent of instructor.
Seminar course for a select number of students enrolled in English 24 designed to enrich the large lecture experience for the motivated student. Course includes either supplementary reading or more intensive study of the English 24 reading list, as well as supplemental writing.
ENGL 25. Literature and the Information, Media, and Communication Revolutions
(4) STAFF
How have language, reading, and literature responded to revolutions in media, communication, and information technology? This course introduces the history and theory of the major changes in human discourse that have led up to our current information age. Readings in literary and artistic works exemplify the creative artist's response to these changes.
ENGL 34. Pan-Latinx Literatures of Transformation
(4) STAFF
Surveys a wide range of literary genres by authors from various Latina/o populations: Salvadoran, Guatemalan, Dominican, Chicanx, Puerto Rican, and self-identified mixed-heritage. Texts explore historical and ongoing transformatio