UC Santa Barbara General CatalogUniversity of California, Santa Barbara

Environmental Studies

Division of Mathematical, Life, and Physical Sciences
Bren 4312
Telephone: (805) 893-2968
E-mail: esprogram@es.ucsb.edu
Website: www.es.ucsb.edu
Program Chair: Carla M. D'Antonio


 

Some courses displayed may not be offered every year. For actual course offerings by quarter, please consult the Quarterly Class Search or GOLD (for current students). To see the historical record of when a particular course has been taught in the past, please visit the Course Enrollment Histories.

Environmental Studies
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Collapse Courses Lower Division 
ENV S 1. Introduction to Environmental Studies
(4) ALAGONA
"Environmental Studies" requires insights from many disciplines, including the social as well as biophysical science and the humanities. This introduction offers an overview of the field, examining both our planet and the ways in which we humans depend on it.
ENV S 1H. Introduction to Environmental Studies - Honors
(1) ALAGONA
Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in ENV S 1; consent of instructor.
Honors section designed for highly motivated students to receive one unit of additional honors credit. Requires one hour per week of in-depth analysis and discussion of "Environmental Studies" with course instructor and completion of a related project.
ENV S 2. Introduction to Environmental Science
(4) STAFF
Enrollment Comments: Not open for credit to students who have completed Environmental Studies 12.
Provides integration of fundamental science with environmental topics. Includes impacts of human population increase; principles of systems and change, biogeochemical cycles, ecosystems and global climate; energy and laws of thermodynamics; water supply and pollution; toxicology and risk analysis; air pollution and stratospheric ozone depletion.
ENV S 2H. Introduction to Environmental Science - Honors
(1) STAFF
Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in ENV S 2; consent of instructor.
Honors section designed for highly motivated students to receive one unit of additional honors credit. Requires one hour per week of in-depth analysis and discussion of "Environmental Science" with course instructor and completion of a related project.
ENV S 3. Introduction to the Social and Cultural Environment
(4) GRAVES
Enrollment Comments: Not open for credit to students who have completed Environmental Studies 11.
An introduction to the relationship of societies and the environment from prehistorical times to the present. The course is global in perspective, andincludes history, literature, philosophy, economics, science, and culture as evidence for examining the human social environment.
ENV S 3H. Introduction to the Social and Cultural Environment - Honors
(1) GRAVES
Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in ENV S 3; Consent of instructor.
Honors section designed for highly motivated students to receive one unit of additional honors credit. Requires one hour per week of in-depth analysis and discussion of the social and cultural environments with course instructor and completion of a related project.
ENV S 15A. Environmental Chemistry
(4) GARDNER
Enrollment Comments: Designed for majors. Quarters usually offered: Winter. Offers students seeking the B.A. degree in Environmental Studies an introduction of chemical processes in an environmental context. Course not offered to students who completed ENVS 15 or CHEM 1B or 1C or 123. Chemistry/science majors shouldenroll in the advanced environmental CHEM course, CHEM 123.
Introduces basic chemistry as relevant to environmental studies includingthe periodic chart, the origin of the elements, nuclear phenomena, molecules vs ionic solids, the composition of the earth from core to crust, the interface of the lithosphere with water and air, weathering, chemicalreactions, stoichiometry, solutions and pH, the hydrosphere and water cycle, issues of water quality, solid waste management, and irrigation. Discussion section allows for review, questions on problem sets, and weekly quizzes.
ENV S 15B. Environmental Chemistry
(5) GARDNER
Prerequisite: Completion of ENV S 15A with a minimum grade of C-.
Enrollment Comments: Designed for majors. Quarters usually offered: Spring. Course is not open to students who have completed ENV S 15 or CHEM 1B or 1C or 123.
Course continues with marine water chemistry, fossil fuels and their combustion, an introduction to organic chemistry, the carbon cycle, the formation and chemical reactions of the atmosphere, ozone and its degradation, the nitrogen cycle, common air pollutants, and issues of climate change chemistry. Laboratory exercises including exploration of nuclear phenomena,recycling aluminum, spectrophotometric analysis, titration, analysis of soil and water, chromatography, and air quality monitoring and will provide students valuable laboratory and field skills used by environmental professionals.
ENV S 15BL. Environmental Chemistry Lab
(1) GARDNER
Prerequisite: Environmental Studies 15A and 15B (Env. St. 15BL may be taken concurrently with Env. St. 15B)
Recommended Preparation: This is the laboratory companion of Environmental Studies 15B.
Enrollment Comments: Designed for majors. Quarters usually offered: Spring.
Introduces laboratory exercises, including explorations of nuclear phenomena, recycling aluminum, spectrophotometric analysis of iron, field and laboratory analysis of soil and water for N and pH, titration for acidity, chromatography, and air quality monitoring, that provide students valuable laboratory and field skills used by environmental professionals.
ENV S 25. Quantitative Thinking in Environmental Studies
(4) STAFF
Improve students’ ability to deal with quantitative aspects of environmental topics by developing skills in algebra, computer use (Excel), graphing, and processing and conceptualizing environmental data by using numerical modeling. Collaborative learning is emphasized.
ENV S 30. Introduction to Environmental Economics
(4) HEILMAYR
Prerequisite: Mathematics 34A or 3A.
Recommended Preparation: Mathematics 34B or 3B.
Economic processes underlie many of the environmental problems facing humanity, but can also play an important role in solving those challenges.This course introduces key theories from micro- and macroeconomics, andapplies them to a variety of environmental problems. Topics covered include individual preferences, efficiency, valuation, market failures andpolicy analysis.
ENV S 95. Introduction to Ecological Restoration Field Skills
(1) STRATTON
Recommended Preparation: Completion of an introductory course in biology, ecology or environmentalscience.
Enrollment Comments: Open to non-majors. Quarters usually offered: Winter, Spring, Fall.
Visit local natural areas to gain hands-on experience in facets of ecological restoration including project planning, site assessment, invasive species management, plant identification and propagation, vegetation and water quality monitoring, and wildlife observation.  Internships available at conclusion of course.
ENV S 96. Introduction to Curation of Natural History Collections
(1) STAFF
Recommended Preparation: Completion of an introductory course in biology, ecology or environmentalscience.
Enrollment Comments: Open to non-majors. Quarters usually offered: Winter, Spring, Fall. Same course as EEMB 96.
Repeat Comments: EEMB 96 and ENV S 96 combined may be taken 3 times in total.
Introduction to curation of natural history collections including vertebrate, plants, algae and lichen. Learn to collect, prepare, catalog, and preserve specimens via lectures, hands-on activities, and field trips. Collection focus changes quarterly. Internships available at conclusion of the course.
ENV S 99. Introduction to Research
(1-5) STAFF
Prerequisite: Consent of department and instructor.
Enrollment Comments: Students should have an overall GPA average of 3.0. May be repeated to a maximum of 8 units. Students limited to 5 units per quarter, and 30 units total in all 98/99/198/199/199AA-ZZ courses combined
Directed study under the guidance of an environmental studies faculty member. Course offers motivated students an opportunity to undertake independent or collaborative research for faculty-directed research projects. Topic and scope varies, to be specified by student and supervisory faculty member prior to registration.
Collapse Courses Upper Division 
ENV S 100. Environmental Ecology
(4) TYLER
Prerequisite: Environmental Studies 2; and Environmental Studies 1 or 3; and MCDB 20 or EEMB 22 or MCDB 1A and EEMB 2. OR MCDB 1A and MCDB 1B and EEMB 2 and EEMB 3.
A study of principles of ecology and their implications for analyzing environmental problems. Focus on understanding the processes controlling the dynamics of populations,communities and ecosystems. Specific examples emphasize the application of these concepts to the management of natural resources.
ENV S 103A. Flora and Vegetation of California
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: MCDB 1A, MCDB 1B, EEMB 2 and EEMB 3. Completion of all listed prerequisiteswith a grade of C- or better.
An introduction to plant families, species, and communities in Californiaby means of laboratory work and field observations, and including techniques of plant collection and identification. One three-day field trip is required in addition to the regularly scheduled laboratories.
ENV S 105. Solar and Renewable Energy
(4) MANALIS
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Recommended Preparation: Environmental Studies 1, 2, and 3.
How solar and renewable energy fits with environmental-energy options in both developed and developing nations. Technologies are studied in terms oftheir effects on the physical, social, and biological environment. Demonstrations, field trips, and guest lecturers.
ENV S 106. Critical Thinking About Human-Environment Problems and Solutions
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Environmental Studies 1 and 3 and upper-division standing.
Recommended Preparation: Environmental Studies 2 and Writing 2, 2E or 2LK.
Enrollment Comments: Quarters usually offered: Fall.
An in-depth examination of critical thinking in environmental contexts. Identification of deceptive methods of environmental critique and debate in policy and public matters. Comprehension of approaches to environmental solutions as well as common thinking traps in developing such solutions. Emphasis on reasoning patterns and leverage points of environmental arguments, systems thinking about environmental problems and solutions,exploration of common errors in scientific reasoning, and framing scientific and environmental issues for clarity and effective communication.
ENV S 108O. History of the Oceans
(4) ALAGONA
Prerequisite: Upper division standing.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as History 108O.
Explores how people have experienced, understood, transformed, and attempted to conserve the world’s oceans throughout human history. Interdisciplinary approach includes aspects of science, technology, politics, law, culture, and material biophysical relationships.
ENV S 108W. Wildlife in America
(4) ALAGONA
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as History 108W.
Explores the turbulent, contested, and colorful history of human interactions with wild animals in North America from the Pleistocene to the present. Readings will explore historical changes in science, politics, law, management, and cultural ideas about nature.
ENV S 111. The California Channel Islands
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: MCDB 1A-1AL and EEMB 2; or MCDB 20 or EEMB 22 or Geography 3A or 3B or Earth Science 2 or Environmental Studies 2.
Recommended Preparation: Introductory chemistry.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Geography 149.
Discussion of biological, geological, ecological, anthropological, and oceanographic characteristics of the Channel Islands area as well as the management and human uses of this region. Emphasis on islands and ocean waters off Southern California.
ENV S 112. World Population, Policies, and the Environment
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Examines the history of global human population growth, with a specific emphasis on demographic dynamics within developing nations (or the Global South). Will consider the social, economic, and environmental consequences of and the relationships between population trends and human migration. Will analyze governmental policies and how they influence population growth and their myriad and often unintended consequences. Students willbe expected to demonstrate familiarity with key theories and methods byscholars like Thomas Malthus, Karl Marx, and Ester Bose.
ENV S 113. Engineering and Environmental Geology
(4) KELLER
Prerequisite: Mathematics 3A-B or 34A-B; and, Physics 1 or 6A or 21; upper-division standing.
Enrollment Comments: Course fee charged.Same course as Earth Science 113.
Application of geologic and environmental principles to civil engineeringproblems. Includes: rock and soil mechanics; landslides; hydrology; earthquakes; and professional practice.
ENV S 114A. Soil Science
(5) CHADWICK
Prerequisite: Chemistry 1A-B; and, Geography 3B or Geology 2.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Geography 114A.
Introduction to the chemical, hydrological, and biological characteristics of soils, their global distribution, and response to management. Field andlaboratory projects provide an understanding of soil-landscape distribution, soil morphology, and the physical and chemical properties that influence management decisions.
ENV S 114B. Soil Genesis and Classification
(5) CHADWICK
Prerequisite: Environmental Studies 114A.
Enrollment Comments: Same Course as Geography 114B.
Introduction to chemical, physical, and biological processes that produce soil and influence their management. Soil morphology, genesis, classification, and global distribution emphasized. Labs cover field site selection, soil description, sampling, laboratory preparation of samples and selected chemical and physical analyses.
ENV S 115. Energy and the Environment
(4) MANALIS
Prerequisite: Environmental Studies 2; and, Environmental Studies 25 or Mathematics 3A or34A or Chemistry 1A or Environmental Studies 15A.
Focus on learning how to use energy efficiently in accordance with the lawsof thermodynamics and in harmony with the environment. Topics include the nature of energy and the fundamentals for a sustainable environmental energy policy.
ENV S 116. Sustainable Communities
(4) PELLOW
Prerequisite: Not open to Freshmen.
Recommended Preparation: Environmental Studies 1 or 2 or 3 or Geography 5.
Examines sustainability, communities, and urban systems in a global context. Covers impacts cities have on the environmental systems that support them, and explores ways to improve urban systems through technology, policy, and design.
ENV S 117. Science and Policy Dimensions of Climate Change
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Climate change and variability due to glabal warming is a critical environmental, social, and economical issue. Course will review the scientific basis of our understanding of climate change and policy responses to the problem including "no regrets" and multiple-benefit responses.
ENV S 118. Industrial Ecology: Designing for the Environment
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Recommended Preparation: Environmental Studies 1, 2, and 3.
Enrollment Comments: Not open for credit to students who have completed Environmental Studies 193IE.
Industrial Ecology is a philosophical and methodical framework interwoven with concepts in ecology and economics used to aid in understanding of how industrial systems interact with the environment. Capital, energy, and material flows are examined and viewed in cultural context.
ENV S 119. Ecology and Management of California Wildlands
(5) D'ANTONIO
Prerequisite: Environmental Studies 100 or EEMB 120 or EEMB 168.
Enrollment Comments: Quarters usually offered: Fall. Same course as EEMB 119. One weekend fieldtrip is mandatory.
Explore ecological processes in California habitats and the challenges oftheir management through field trips, discussions with land managers, lectures and readings. Focus on regional habitats including specialized habitats such as coastal salt marsh and vernal pools, and more widespread such as oak savanna and chaparral.
ENV S 120. Toxics in the Environment
(4) GARDNER
Prerequisite: Environmental Studies 2; MCDB 20 or EEMB 22 or MCDB 1A-AL and EEMB 2; Chemistry 1A and 1B or Environmental Studies 15A and 15B.
Recommended Preparation: One course in introductory statistics.
Effects and implications for the future of introducing toxins into the biosphere. Examination of physiological and biochemical effects and the mechanisms of action of the potential toxins. Discussion of methodological approaches and legal ramifications of studies in environmental toxicology.
ENV S 120A. Introduction to Environmental Toxicology
(4) GARDNER
Prerequisite: Environmental Studies 2; MCDB 20 or EEMB 22 or MCDB 1A-AL and EEMB 2; Chemistry 1A and 1B or Environmental Studies 15A and 15B.
Recommended Preparation: One course in introductory statistics.
Enrollment Comments: Course not open to students who completed Environmental Studies 120.
Uses case studies, such as the poisoning at Minamata, Japan, to introduce the various fields of toxicology (eco-, environmental, biomedical, and epidemiology) and basic toxicological principles as metal and radiation toxicities, transformations, cycling, and transport of metals and radioisotopes in the environment, toxins vs toxicants, routes of exposure, absorption, distribution, target organs, dose, metabolism, sequestration, and excretion, as well as destruction due to atomic bomb blast (Hiroshima) vs. fission reactor explosion (Chernobyl and Fukushima), mutagenicity, and carcinogenicity.
ENV S 120B. Advanced Environmental Toxicology
(4) GARDNER
Prerequisite: Environmental Studies 120 or 120A.
A continuation of Introduction to Environmental Toxicology (ENV S 120A). Using additional case studies such as the decline of Baltic seals, the birth defects caused by thalidomide, and the cancers caused by DES, course explores reproductive and developmental toxicology, teratogenicity, epigenetic effects, carcinogenicity (again), and estrogen effects while examining organic chemistry, chlorinated hydrocarbons, pesticides, solvents, and structure activity relationships.
ENV S 121. Contaminants of Emerging Concern
(4) GARDNER
Prerequisite: Environmental Studies 120 or 120A.
There has been an increase in both the number of substances to which consumers are exposed and the awareness of the potential ill effects of these substances. Personal care products, medications, and food additives are comingunder increasing scrutiny, and we are aware that they are having unintendedeffects, but their presence in the environment is largely unregulated. Thiscourse takes students through the classes of contaminants of emerging concern (CECs), discussing previously-assigned papers and researching a CEC of their choice from cradle-to-grave.
ENV S 122CC. Cultural Representations - The Rhetoric of Climate Change
(4) HILTNER
Prerequisite: Writing 2 or upper-division standing.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as English 122CC.
Course examines the debate around climate change and climate science. Wewill examine rhetorics and utilize literary methodologies to investigate their imagined futures. We will read texts that urge us to take climate change seriously as well as analyze some of the tropes most frequently used in denial literature. The goal is not only to understand the implicit narrativization of climate change, but to assess how humanistic methodologies can contribute to these debates and contribute to imagining differentfutures.
ENV S 122LE. Cultural Representations: Literature and the Environment
(4) HILTNER
Prerequisite: Writing 2 or upper-division standing.
Enrollment Comments: Not open for credit to students who have completed English 22. Same course as English 122LE.
Environmental survey of Western literature that explores the often-ignored literary history of the natural world.
ENV S 122NE. Cultural Representations: Nature and the Environment
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Writing 2 or 50 or 109 (one course from 109 series) or English 10 or upper-division standing.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as English 122NE.
Perceptions of nature have changed throughout history and vary across cultures. Course explores changing expressions of our changing relations to the world we live in, with emphasis on cultural movements (films, literature, newspapers, etc.) that have affected contemporary American experience.
ENV S 125A. Principles of Environmental Law
(4) KROP
Prerequisite: Environmental Studies 1 or 2 or 3; and upper-division standing.
An introduction to the history and methodology of law as it relates to human use of the environment. Case studies are used to examine common law, constitutional and modern environmental laws, with an emphasis on current theories and principles.
ENV S 125B. Land Use and Planning Law
(4) KROP
Prerequisite: Environmental Studies 125A or 135A.
An examination of local, state, and federal laws regulating land use and development. Selected problems analyzed through case studies.
ENV S 127A. Foundations of Environmental Education
(4) LEWIN
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher.
Recommended Preparation: Environmental Studies 1 or 2 or 3 or any introductory natural science course or consent of instructor.
Enrollment Comments: Quarters usually offered: Winter.
Repeat Comments: Not open to students who have completed ENVS 127.
Introduction to the underlying principles to be an environmental educator. Includes understanding the fundamental characteristics and goals of Environmental Education (EE), evolution of the field, instructional methodologies, and how to design, implement, and assess effective EE instruction in avariety of disciplines, including: nature connection, environmental justice, outdoor education, and primary, secondary, and higher education. Course includes presentations by local EE professionals and field trips.
ENV S 127B. Advanced Environmental Education and Practicum
(4) LEWIN
Prerequisite: Environmental Studies 127A.
Recommended Preparation: Environmental Studies 1, 2, and 3.
Enrollment Comments: Quarters usually offered: Spring.
Students learn advanced teaching skills, mentoring strategies, and methods of assessing Environmental Education (EE). Course provides the opportunity to implement and evaluate one's own EE project in a self- selected local organization, school, agency, or other educational setting. Provides real-world teaching experience with support from EE professionals. Students create a portfolio to showcase their community environmentally educational placement.
ENV S 128. Foundations of Ecosystem Restoration
(4) D'ANTONIO
Prerequisite: Environmental Studies 100 or EEMB 120 or EEMB 168.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as EEMB 128.
Integrates ecological principles with practical issues involved in ecosystem restoration. Beginning with the challenge of selecting goals and establishing a target trajectory, students evaluate how ecological knowledge can guide restoration and whether sustainable states or trajectories can be achieved.
ENV S 129. Ecopsychology
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Environmental Studies 1 or 2 or 3.
Course explores the theories and practices of psychologists, educators, andothers whose work is focused on the connections between "inner" human nature and "outer" nature within which humans experience themselves and the restof the world.
ENV S 130A. Coupled Human and Natural Systems: Risks, Vulnerability, Resilience, and Disasters
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Anthropology 2 or Environmental Studies 1 or 3.
Enrollment Comments: Quarters usually offered: Fall. Same course as Anthropology 130A.
Examines human dimensions of global environmental change in developing countries from an interdisciplinary social science perspective. Compares andcontrasts alternative conceptual and analytical models of dynamic, interrelated human-environmental systems and presents recent approaches to understanding risk, vulnerability, resilience, and disasters.
ENV S 130B. Global Tourism and Environmental Conservation
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Anthropology 2 or Environmental Studies 1 or 3.
Recommended Preparation: Environmental Studies 130A or Anthropology 130A.
Enrollment Comments: Quarters usually offered: Winter. Same course as Anthropology 130B.
Focus on the contradictions between international tourism as an economic development strategy and environmental conservation efforts, especially in an era of climate change. One major objective is to help students make more informed decisions about their own tourist experiences.
ENV S 130C. Global Food Systems and Human Food Security
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Anthropology 2 or Environmental Studies 1 or 3.
Recommended Preparation: Environmental Studies 130A or 130B or Anthropology 130A or 130B.
Enrollment Comments: Quarters usually offered: Spring. Same course as Anthropology 130C.
Examines history of global food system and its impacts on ecosystems, ecologies, and human nutrition and food security. How agricultural, capture fisheries, and aquacultural industries were integrated into the global foodsystem. Provides information to make more informed decisions about consuming these products.
ENV S 130SD. The World in 2050: Sustainable Development and Its Alternatives
(4) FORAN
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Sociology 130SD.
Starting with the current political, economic, cultural, and climate crisesof Earth and humanity, we consider alternatives to the present system - sustainable development, regrowth, transition towns, resilience - and our roles in building a far better world by 2050.
ENV S 131. International Environmental Law and Politics
(4) PULVER
Prerequisite: Environmental Studies 1 or 2 or 3.
An examination of the actors and institutions of international environmental law and politics, with an emphasis on explaining patterns of success andfailure in addressing global environmental problems.
ENV S 132. Human Behavior and Global Environment
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Course is not open to freshmen.
Study of global environmental impacts of major human technological innovations, including the use of fire, development of agriculture, and theprocess of industrialization. How did Western and non-Western societiesview and treat nature? Evaluation of prospects for altering human behavior to encourage sustainable development is included.
ENV S 134. Coastal Processes and Management
(4) KELLER
Prerequisite: Environmental Studies 2; Mathematics 3A or 34A or Environmental Studies 25;Geology 1 or 2 or 4 or 20 or Geography 3A or 3B.
Recommended Preparation: introductory biology.
Using representative coastal regimes, students study the major processes atwork in our nation's coastal zones and examine the nature and efficacy of the planning and management programs that have been put in place in these areas.
ENV S 134CJ. Climate Justice
(4) FORAN
Prerequisite: Upper division standing.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Sociology 134CJ.
Overview of the climate change problem and exploration of the meanings of the term "climate justice" as used by scholars and social movement activists to imagine and create a sustainable, equitable, democratic world for future generations.
ENV S 134EC. Earth in Crisis
(4) FORAN
Prerequisite: Upper division standing.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Sociology 134EC.
Explores the causes and consequences of climate change on a global scale,covering the state of the science in layman's terms, the current and future social impacts of climate change, the global negotiations process, andclimate justice activism.
ENV S 135A. Principles of Environmental Planning
(4) WACK
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Introduction to the history, theory, and trends of urban, regional, and environmental planning in both California and the United States. Field trips to local urban areas.
ENV S 135B. Advanced Environmental Planning
(4) WACK
Prerequisite: Environmental Studies 135A.
Advanced seminar applying principles presented in environmental studies 135A to regional and local government planning processes. Field analysis of local planning issues.
ENV S 136. Green Works - Exploring Technology and the Search for Sustainability
(4) FELDWINN
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Education 136.
A multi-disciplinary class examining the interplay of technology, society, science, and history. Investigate green technologies in an interactive class format designed to encourage discussion and debate. Innovative science and social science labs provide hands-on learning.
ENV S 136O. Sustainable Architecture: History and Aesthetics
(4) WELTER
Prerequisite: Not open to freshmen.
Recommended Preparation: Art History 5A or 6F.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Art History 136O.
Course examines history and theory of sustainable and "green" architecture since the early twentieth century. Emphasis is placed on the critical analysis of a distinct "green" architectural aesthetic; the scope is global.
ENV S 139. Business and Environment
(4) PULVER
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing only
Enrollment Comments: Quarters usually offered: Spring.
Analysis of the practices of environmentally responsible firms and of thedrivers of business greening at the level of individual firms, particularindustries, and of the economy as a whole.
ENV S 141. Chemistry of Global Change
(4) CLARK
Prerequisite: Chemistry 1B and Math 3B, Math 34B or Environmental Studies 25.
Examines the fate of fossil fuel carbon dioxide within the context of theglobal carbon cycle. It will address questions such as: Which reservoirs have adsorbed the emitted fossil fuel carbon dioxide? Why has so littleof the emitted carbon dioxide entered the ocean? Why and how will the ocean chemistry change? What are the expected effects on the marine ecosystem? Includes a term paper, problem sets, and in-class exams.
ENV S 142. Microbes and the Human Environment
(4) SCHIMEL
Prerequisite: Chemistry 1A or Environmental Studies 15A; and, MCDB 20 or EEMB 22 or EEMB 2.
The Earth is a microbial planet. Most life on earth is microbial: bacteria, fungi, single-celled algae. Microbes control the climate and drive ecosystems. They also control human society: disease, enabling agriculture, and producing valued materials. Course will involve modules exploringhow microorganisms influence the human environment: Microbes in the Earth System, Agriculture, Industry, and Disease. In each module, we will explore important current news stories and develop some of the essential background science.
ENV S 143. Endangered Species Management
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Environmental Studies 2 and 1 or 3.
Recommended Preparation: Recommended preparation: Environmental Studies 125A.
Examination of the protection and management of endangered species through analysis of the state and federal endangered species acts. Topics include biodiversity, speciation and extinction rates, the history of endangered species legislation, and selected species' case studies.
ENV S 144. Form, Process And Human Use Of Rivers
(4) KELLER
Prerequisite: Mathematics 3A-B or 34A-B.
Recommended Preparation: Physics 1 or 6A/6AL or Geology 117.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Geography 144.
Basic understanding of fluvial (river) hydrology. In-depth evaluation of channel form and fluvial processes and impact of human use of rivers.
ENV S 146. Animals in Human Society: Ethical Issues of Animal Use
(4) PELLOW
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Recommended Preparation: Environmental Studies 1 or 3.
An exploration of the ethical issues which arise when humans interact with other animals, and an examination of conflicting attitudes toward the valueof animal life in such specific areas as food production, recreational activities, research and environmental protection.
ENV S 147. Air Quality and the Environment
(4) GARDNER
Prerequisite: Mathematics 3A or 34A or Environmental Studies 25; and, Chemistry 1A and 1B, or Environmental Studies 15A and 15B.
Types, sources, effects, and control of air pollution. Topics include gaseous pollutants particulates, toxic contaminants, atmospheric dispersion,photochemical smog, acid rain control measures, the clean air act and regulatory trends, indoor air.
ENV S 149. World Agriculture, Food, and Population
(4) CLEVELAND
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Geography 161.
Evolution, current status, and alternative futures of agriculture, food andpopulation worldwide. Achieving environmentally, socially, and economicallysustainable food systems; soil, water, crops, energy and labor; diversity, stability and ecosystems management; farmer and scientist knowledge and collaboration; common property management.
ENV S 151. Environmental Anthropology
(4) HOELLE
Prerequisite: Environmental Studies 1 or 3 or Anthropology 2.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Anthropology 152.
Examines the ways that humans interact with, use, and perceive the environment and nature, with a focus on the cultural, political, and economic features of human environment relationships across time and in differentparts of the world. Through readings, in-class activities and discussions, field trips, and research projects, students will gain a better understanding of how anthropological theory, research, and applications can be used to address contemporary environment topics and problems.
ENV S 152. Applied Marine Ecology
(5) SCHMITT, STAFF
Prerequisite: Environmental Studies 100, or EEMB 2 and MCDB 1B, or EEMB 3; and Mathematics 3A or 34A.
Recommended Preparation: EEMB 120.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as EEMB 152.
Introduction to the application of ecological principles and methods to environmental problems in marine habitats. Focus on problems that are local, regional, and global in scale. Concepts illustrated with case studies.
ENV S 154. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for Environmental Applications
(4) ROBERT HEILMAYR
Prerequisite: Environmental Studies 2 and either Environmental Studies 1 or 3.
Recommended Preparation: Geography 3A or 3B or Earth Science 2 or 4 or 20.
Explores how Geographic Information Systems (GIS) can help environmental researchers and professionals analyze and communicate the spatial patterns underpinning a wide variety of environmental concerns. Introduces students to the basic theory and application of GIS through hands-on application of the technology to environmental questions.
ENV S 157. Santa Barbara County Agrifood System
(4) CLEVELAND
Prerequisite: Environmental Studies 149 or Geography 161. Consent of instructor also required prior to enrollment in the course.
Enrollment Comments: Concurrently offered with ENV S 257. Course may be repeated up to three times for credit, but not more than 8 units total may be used to satisfy major requirements.
Investigates current agricultural system and potential benefits and costsof localization. Covers theory, data collection, analysis methods, key indicators (greenhouse gas emissions, biodiversity, migrant labor, nutrition, community health), policies and actions for change. Students conduct and present research as team.
ENV S 158. Cultural and Biological Diversity of Food Plants
(4) CLEVELAND
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Recommended Preparation: Environmental Studies 149 or Geography 161.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Geography 169.
The evolution of food plants from domestication to genetic engineering. Patterns of diversity around the world in small-scale, traditionally-based and industrial communities. Class participation in project on local olive diversity includes field work.
ENV S 160. American Environmental Literature
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Environmental Studies 1 or 2 or 3; and Writing 2 or 2E or 2LK or one course from Writing 105A-Z, 107A-Z, or 109AA-ZZ.
Assesses contributions of literary texts to american environmental movements. Examines influences of writers such as Thoreau, Rachel Carson, and Edward Abbey upon environmental perceptions, values, and attitudes in american cultural history and upon rhetorics and politics of contemporary environmental debates.
ENV S 161. Environmental Communications: Contemporary Strategies and Tactics
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Environmental Studies 1 or 2 or 3 and upper-division standing.
Surveys strategies and tactics for communicating about the environment and sustainability in various organizational, political, cultural, business, mass media and social media contexts. Students will analyze, evaluate and practice communications methods using a spectrum of communicationschannels.
ENV S 162. Environmental Water Quality
(4) LOAICIGA
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Recommended Preparation: Geography 3B, lower-division biology and chemistry.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Geography 162.
Study of physio-chemical and biological characteristics of natural waters, analysis of water pollution and treatment, water-quality regulations. Laboratory: independent and supervised research of water pollutants and treatment, quantitative analysis of water-quality data and one-day field work.
ENV S 165A. Environmental Impact Analysis
(4) STONE
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Recommended Preparation: Environmental Studies 116 or 135A.
Analyzes the historical and theoretical approaches to environmental assessment methodology and procedures for preparing and reviewing environmental impact reports. Explores strengths and weaknesses of current public policy context.
ENV S 165B. Advanced Environmental Impact Analysis
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Environmental Studies 165A; consent of department.
Enrollment Comments: Other course work and/or experience may be substituted for Environmental Studies 165A, with the consent of the instructor(s).
Advanced seminar during which students prepare their own focused environmental impact report on a specific development project. Includes in-depth discussion of baseline, mitigation, impacts, and public comments. Assignments based on research and fieldwork provide reality professional environmental planning experience.
ENV S 166BT. Biotechnology, Food, and Agriculture
(4) CLEVELAND
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Recommended Preparation: Environmental Studies 149 or Geography 161.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Geography 171BT. Course offered every other year.
Social, cultural, ethical, biological, and environmental issues surroundingbiotechnology (BT) and the food system. Includes theory and method of BT; scientific, social and political control of BT; effect of BT on genetic diversity, small-scale farmers, the environment, food supply, consumer health.
ENV S 166DC. Diet and Global Climate Change
(4) CLEVELAND
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Course investigates the potential of diet change to mitigate anthropogenic global climate change via production, processing and transport of food,and by improved nutrition and health. The potential for eaters to change diets and policy makers to promote diet change will also be examined.
ENV S 166FP. Small-Scale Food Production
(5) CLEVELAND
Prerequisite: Environmental Studies 149 or Geography 161. Consent of instructor required.
Enrollment Comments: Quarters usually offered: Spring. Same course as Geography 171FP.
Biological, ecological, social, and economic principles of small-scale food production and their practical applications. Includes each student cultivating a garden plot; lab exercises, field trips to local farms and gardens.
ENV S 167. Biogeography: The Study of Plant and Animal Distributions
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Geography 3A or 3B or Environmental Studies 2 or EEMB 2 or Earth Science 2.
Recommended Preparation: a prior course in EEMB.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Geography 167.
Basic processes governing geographic distribution patterns of biota, including migration, evolution, isolation, and endemism. Biogeographic regions and their histories and an introduction to island biogeography. Emphasis on plants and plant geography. One all-day field trip.
ENV S 168. Aqueous Transport of Pollutants
(4) CLARK
Prerequisite: Mathematics 3B and Chemistry 1A-B-C.
Recommended Preparation: Earth 113 or Earth 173 or Geography 116 or Geography 144 or Environmental Studies 144.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Earth 168.
Focus on the behavior of dissolved species in rivers. Examination of the basic advection-diffusion model. Particular emphasis on field data.
ENV S 168JH. Gauchos, Cowboys, and Indians
(4) HOELLE
Prerequisite: Environmental Studies 1 or 3 or Anthropology 2.
Enrollment Comments: Open to non-majors. Same course as Anthropology 168JH.
Focuses on gauchos, cowboys, and indigenous groups, and their cultural practices in relation to the environment. The contrasting ways that they are represented in popular culture and debates about environmental sustainability is examined.
ENV S 169. Tracer and Contaminant Hydrology
(4) CLARK
Prerequisite: Mathematics 3B and Chemistry 1A-B-C.
Recommended Preparation: Earth 113 or Earth 173 or Geography 116 or Geography 144 or Environmental Studies 144.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Earth 169.
Introduction to principles of chemical and isotope tracer hydrology. Emphasis on methods of groundwater dating, the use of tracers as management tools, and contaminate plume monitoring.
ENV S 171. Ecosystem Processes
(4) SCHIMEL
Prerequisite: Environmental Studies 100 or EEMB 2 or MCDB 1B.
Recommended Preparation: EEMB 120.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as EEMB 171.
An examination of the key processes that regulate ecosystem productivity and function in terrestrial ecosystems. Specific foci include: plant- soil linkages including decomposition and nutrient supply, and the role of above- and below-ground community composition on element cycles.
ENV S 172. Waste Management: Product Stewardship, Recycling and Renewable Energy
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Environmental Studies 1 or 2 or 3.
Recommended Preparation: Introductory economics; electives in biology and natural sciences.
Overview of policy, technology, and economic dimensions of managing wastes in the twenty-first century. Covers the emergence of product stewardship, domestic and international recycling, composting of organic materials, conversion of organic materials to renewable energy, waste incinerationand land filling.
ENV S 173. American Environmental History
(4) GRAVES
Enrollment Comments: Same course as History 173T.
Traces the history of American attitudes and behavior toward nature. Focus on wilderness, the conservation movement, and modern forms of environmentalism.
ENV S 174. Environmental Policy And Economics
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Economics 1 or 2 or 9.
Introductory course on economic analysis of environmental policy. Topics include market failure, the evaluation of environmental policy, energy sources, population growth, sustainable development, the optimal levels of biodiversity and pollution, and dispute resolution.
ENV S 175. Environmental Economics
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Economics 10A or 100A or 104A.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Economics 115.
Provides a rigorous treatment of environmental economics. topics include welfare analysis, ethical dimensions of economic criteria for protecting the environment, measuring the demand for environmental goods, property rights, economic incentives, including marketable permits and emission fees,and regulating risk.
ENV S 176A. Water Policy in the West: Linking Science with Environmental and Economic Values
(4) STAFF
Recommended Preparation: Environmental Studies 1 or 2 or 3.
Examines water supply and use, the science of water systems and watersheds,key concepts in water policy, and the basics of water law as a fundamental element of the history and context for water policy in the West.
ENV S 176B. Advanced Study of Water Policy
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Environmental Studies 176A.
Students are in the field full-time for approximately two weeks to study watersheds and water systems including Yosemite/Hetch Hetchy, Mono Lake, and the state and federal water systems in California.
ENV S 177. Comparative Environmental Politics
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Environmental Studies 1 or Political Science 6
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Political Science 177.
Course is structured around the major issues in environmental politics, forexample: global warming, nuclear waste, deforestation, and chemical pollution. The roles of economics, technology and social organization are each considered as explanatory variables for understanding environmental problems.
ENV S 178. Politics of the Environment
(4) SMITH
Prerequisite: Political Science 12 or Environmental Studies 3; upper-division standing.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Political Science 175.
Analysis of environmental policy issues and their treatment in the political process. Discussion of the interplay of substantive issues, ideology, institutions, and private groups in the development, management, protection, and preservation of natural resources and the natural environment.
ENV S 179. Natural Resource Economics
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Economics 10A or 100A or 104A.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Economics 122.
Theory and capital theory applied to problems of conservation and management of natural resources. Analysis of public policy with special emphasis on nonrenewable resources, management of forests, deforestation and species extinction, and use of fish and game resources.
ENV S 180. Global Environmental Movements
(4) PELLOW
Prerequisite: Not open to freshman.
Recommended Preparation: Environmental Studies 1 or 2 or 3.
Repeat Comments: Not open for credit to students who have completed Environmental Studies 193GE.
Examines historical and contemporary environmental and human rights movements around the world. Subject matter includes: policy- driven/reformist environmental movements, radical underground and militant movements, indigenous peoples’ movements, environmental movements in the Global South, and coalitions and transnational advocacy networks focused on confronting climate change and resource extraction associated with industrial agriculture, mining, timber harvesting, hydroelectric dam construction, fracking, oil and tarsands, and the international hazardous waste trade. Studentslearn theories and concepts from the social sciences and environmental humanities.
ENV S 181. Power, Justice, and the Environment
(4) PELLOW
Prerequisite: Not open to Freshmen.
Recommended Preparation: Environmental Studies 1 or 2 or 3.
Enrollment Comments: Not open for credit to students who have completed Environmental Studies 193PJ
Repeat Comments: Not open for credit to students who have completed Environmental Studies 193PJ.
Introduces students to the theoretical and historical foundations of research on environmental racism and environmental inequality. Examines social scientific evidence concerning these phenomena and the efforts by community residents, activists, workers, and governments to combat it. Considers the social forces that create environmental inequalities so that we may understand their causes, consequences, and the possibilities for achieving environmental justice. Students will master social scientific theories and concepts related to the subject matter.
ENV S 183. Films of the Natural and Human Environment
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Recommended Preparation: Environmental Studies 1 or 2 or 3.
Course presents a series of popular films and professional documentaries representing a range of trends, images, and issues associated with the natural and human environments. Visual images and critical thinking skills are combined to enhance understanding of environmental issues presented by the media.
ENV S 184. Gender and the Environment
(4) CREMERS
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Recommended Preparation: Environmental Studies 1 or Anthropology 2.
A philosophical, evolutionary, and cross-cultural analysis of the ways women and men may relate differently to their environment resulting in the design of gender-sensitive and sustainable policies for planning and development in both the developing and the developed world.
ENV S 185. Human Environmental Rights
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Environmental Studies 1 or 3 or Anthropology 2.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Anthropology 185.
Introduction to human environmental rights. Examines the expansion of humanrights to include human environmental rights, abuses of human environmentalrights, associated social conflicts, and emergent social movements including environmental justice and transnational advocacy networks.
ENV S 188. The Ethics of Human-Environment Relations
(4) GRAVES
Prerequisite: Environmental Studies 1 or 3.
Enrollment Comments: Quarters usually offered: Winter.
Survey of contemporary environmental ethics, focusing on both philosophical and applied issues. Topics include anthropocentrism and its alternatives, the role of science and aesthetics, multicultural perspectives and the problem of relativism, and the conflict between radical and reformist environmentalism.
ENV S 189. Religion And Ecology In The Americas
(4) TALAMANTEZ
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Religious Studies 193.
An overview of the growing field of religion and ecology in the Americas. Focus on spiritual traditions and landbased knowledge indigenous to the Western hemisphere.
ENV S 190. Colloquium On Current Topics In Environmental Studies
(1) STAFF
Recommended Preparation: Introductory course in environmental studies or related discipline.
Enrollment Comments: This is a one unit, pass/no pass only course open to all majors and alllevels. Students majoring in Environmental Studies are required to takethe class at least once for graduation. May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 3 units.
A series of weekly lectures by distinguished guest speakers designed tooffer insight into current research and issues in the diverse intellectual fields that constitute environmental studies. Colloquium themes vary quarter to quarter. Regular attendance and a brief written evaluationof each lecture is required.
ENV S 191. Nature and Science Education Practicum
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: ENVS 2 and MCDB 20 or EEMB 22; or MCDB 1A and MCDB 1B and EEMB 2 and EEMB 3; or by permission of the instructor
Recommended Preparation: ENV S 100 or EEMB 120 or 168
Enrollment Comments: Students in related majors should consult with the instructor about the possibility of using other course work toward meeting prerequisites. Same course as EEMB 189.
Offered in conjunction with CCBER's Kids in Nature environmental education program, students gain hands-on experience teaching ecology and environmental science while receiving instruction from professionals on topics ranging from science education, teaching strategies, lesson plan development, and public speaking.
ENV S 192. Internships In Environmental Studies
(1-12) STAFF
Prerequisite: Minimum sophomore standing, 2.75 overall G.P.A., and be declared an Environmental Studies or Hydrologic Sciences major; or consent by department.
Enrollment Comments: Quarters usually offered: Winter, Spring, Summer, Fall. This is a variable unit Pass/No Pass only course that may be repeated multiple quarters for a maximum of 12 total units. Only 4 units total may apply toward major requirements.
Opportunities to learn about practical approaches to environmental problem solving by working under faculty direction as interns with local, state, and federal agencies, non-governmental organizations, or private business concerned with the environment. Periodic and final reports will be part of the internship.
ENV S 193AAZZ. Special Topics In Environmental Studies.
(1-5) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 16 units provided letter designations are different, but only 12 units may be applied toward the major.
One-time course taught by lecturers or guest professors on a special area of interest in environmental studies. Specific course titles and topics to be announced by the Environmental Studies program each quarter.
ENV S 193BH. Topics in Marine Conservation
ENV S 193CE. Environmental and Social Perspectives on the Circular Economy
ENV S 193CF. Community Forestry
ENV S 193CO. Where's My Beach? Law, Policy and Politics at the CA Coastal Commission
ENV S 193CP. Conservation Planning
ENV S 193CS. People’s Science: An introduction to “citizen” and community science
ENV S 193EC. Ethnoecology
ENV S 193EF. Environmental Futures
ENV S 193EH. Field Studies in Environment and History
ENV S 193ER. Environment in the 21st Century
ENV S 193FE. Film and the Environment
ENV S 193GB. Green Building Design & Operations
ENV S 193GE. Global Environmental Movements
ENV S 193GI. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for Environmental Applications
ENV S 193GO. Elephants and Whales: Changing Values Reflected in International Law
ENV S 193HW. Hope That Works
ENV S 193IE. Special Topics In Environmental Studies.
ENV S 193ME. Microbes and the Human Environment
ENV S 193MP. Marine Policy
ENV S 193PD. Special Topics In Environmental Studies.
ENV S 193PJ. Power, Justice, and the Environment
ENV S 193PL. America's Public Lands and Waters - Law and Policy
ENV S 193PR. Development, Displacement, and the Environment: Local to the Global
ENV S 193PS. The Art of Public Speaking for the Environment
ENV S 193SE. The Built World: Infrastructure and Environmental Change
ENV S 193SP. Group Research Project: Creeks of Santa Barbara
ENV S 193ST. Teaching Environmental Literacy
ENV S 193SU. Special Topics In Environmental Studies.
ENV S 193UE. The Urban Environment
ENV S 193WL. Wild Literature in the Urban Landscape
ENV S 193XL. Contaminants of Emerging Concern
ENV S 193ZZ. Special Topics In Environmental Studies.
ENV S 194AAZZ. Group Study
(1-5) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division status and consent of instructor.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 15 units, but only 4 units may be applied toward the major.
Directed group reading, study, and research on specific subject for Environmental Studies majors. Admission by specific arrangement with the Environmental Studies chair.
ENV S 194BL. Group Study
ENV S 194CA. Group Study
ENV S 194CE. Group Study
ENV S 194CL. Group Study
ENV S 194CW. Group Study
ENV S 194DD. Group Study
ENV S 194DS. Group Study
ENV S 194ES. Group Study
ENV S 194FF. Group Study
ENV S 194GB. Green Building LEED Living Lab
ENV S 194LE. Group Study
ENV S 194RE. Group Study
ENV S 194SC. Group Study
ENV S 194SF. Group Study
ENV S 194SL. Group Study
ENV S 194SP. Group Study
ENV S 194WA. Group Study
ENV S 194WC. Group Study
ENV S 194WE. Group Study
ENV S 196. Introduction to Teaching in Environmental Studies
(2-4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; consent of instructor and department.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 8 units but only 4 units can be applied towards the major.
Students assist instructor in teaching course in which the student previously received a grade of A- or better. Activities determined in consultation with the instructor and may include assisting in laboratories, tutorials, discussion sections and field trips.
ENV S 197. Senior Thesis
(6) PULVER
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; consent of instructor.
Recommended Preparation: Student should have an overall grade-point average of 3.0 or higher.
Enrollment Comments: Course normally taken fall quarter of the senior year and is required for students completing the environmental studies senior honors program.
Under the guidence of the instructor, students select a topic and advisor in an environmental field of their choice and develop, write and present a thesis.
ENV S 199. Independent Investigation in Environmental Studies
(1-5) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; completion of two upper-division courses in environmental studies; consent of instructor and department.
Enrollment Comments: Students must have a minimum 3.0 GPA for the preceding 3 quarters and are limited to 5 units per quarter and 30 units total in all 98/99/198/199/199AA-ZZ courses combined. Only four units count for credit in the major. May berepeated to a maximum of 30 units.
Independent research under the guidance of a faculty member in the department. Course offers qualified students the opportunity to undertake research or work in a topic related to the characteristics and problems in the environment.
ENV S 199RA. Independent Research Assistance in Environmental Studies
(1-5) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; completion of two upper-division courses in environmental studies; consent of instructor and department.
Enrollment Comments: Students must have a minimum 3.0 GPA for the preceding 3 quarters and are limited to 5 units per quarter and 30 units total in all 98/99/198/199/199AA-ZZ courses combined. No more than 4 units may be counted toward the major.
Faculty supervised research assistance.
Collapse Courses Graduate 
ENV S 200. Core Seminar in Environment and Society
(4) STAFF
Enrollment Comments: Quarters usually offered: Fall. Required for students pursuing the Interdepartmental PhD Emphasis in Environment and Society. May be taken for a maximum of 12 units but no more than 4 units may apply towards the PhD Emphasis requirements.
Seminar provides students with a broad introduction to key environmental theories, concepts, problems, and methods from the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences. Students learn to appreciate the diversity of approaches to understanding current environmental issues, and develop a basic vocabulary to discuss these issues with colleagues from other disciplines. Course is required for students pursuing the Interdepartmental PhD Emphasis in Environment and Society and is open to others with the permission of the instructor.
ENV S 257. Advanced Santa Barbara County Agrifood System
(4) CLEVELAND
Prerequisite: Graduate level and instructor approval required.
Recommended Preparation: Environmental Studies 149 or Anthropology 149 or Geography 161.
Enrollment Comments: Concurrently offered with ENV S 157.
Investigates current agricultural system and potential benefits and costs of localization. Covers theory, data collection, analysis methods, key indicators (greenhouse gas emissions, biodiversity, migrant labor, nutrition, community health), policies and actions for change. Students conduct and present research at advanced level.
ENV S 293AAZZ. Advanced Special Topics in Environmental Studies
(1-4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of the instructor.
Repeat Comments: Course is repeatable to a maximum of 12 units.
Graduate seminar focusing on special topics of current importance in Environmental Studies. Course content will vary. Information on course may be obtained from the Environmental Studies office.
ENV S 293ES. Advanced Special Topics in Environmental Studies
ENV S 293GS. Advanced Special Topics in Environmental Studies
ENV S 293SP. Advanced Special Topics in Environmental Studies
ENV S 500. Teaching Assistant Training
(1) STAFF
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit.
Examines effective teaching methods and professional conduct and responsibilities. Emphasis on teaching aids, examination preparation, and grading. Includes general orientation regarding the University of California and UCSB campus; various pertinent regulations; and services available to teaching assistants and to students.
ENV S 501. Teaching Assistant Practicum
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Concurrent appointment as a teaching assistant in environmental studies.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit.
Students gain practical experience in teaching while coordinating one or more discussion/lab sections. Responsibilities include analyses of course texts/materials, discussion/lab sections, and formulation of topics/ questionsfor papers and examinations. Evaluations are completed by members of the class sections.
ENV S 596. Directed Reading and Research
(2-8) STAFF
Prerequisite: Enrolled graduate student at UCSB; consent of instructor and department.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit.
Individual tutorial. Hours and credit by arrangement with an individual faculty member in environmental studies. Written proposal for each tutorial must be approved by the instructor and the department chair.