UC Santa Barbara General CatalogUniversity of California, Santa Barbara

French and Italian

Division of Humanities and Fine Arts
Advising Offices: Phelps Hall 4206
Administrative Offices: Phelps Hall 5206
Telephone: (805) 893-3111

Undergraduate Advisor: Megan Ashley
Undergraduate e-mail: mmashley@ucsb.edu

Graduate Program Coordinator: Jeremy Moore
Telephone: (805) 893-2131
Graduate e-mail: jmoore@ucsb.edu 

Website: www.frit.ucsb.edu
Department Chair: Jean Marie Schultz
E-mail: jmschultz@frit.ucsb.edu


 

Some courses displayed may not be offered every year. For actual course offerings by quarter, please consult the Quarterly Class Search or GOLD (for current students). To see the historical record of when a particular course has been taught in the past, please visit the Course Enrollment Histories.

French
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Collapse Courses Lower Division 
FR 1. Elementary French
(5) STAFF
Introductory course for students with no prior exposure to French. Grammar, vocabulary, speaking, reading, and writing taught entirely in French through interactive presentations and activities. Exposure to French and Francophone culture is a hallmark of the program. Four days a week.
FR 2. Elementary French
(5) STAFF
Prerequisite: French 1.
A continuation of French 1. Targets students' developing knowledge of the fundamentals of French language, focusing on speaking, reading, and writing abilities through a focus on French and Francophone culture. Meets four days a week; in French.
FR 3. Elementary French
(5) STAFF
Prerequisite: French 2.
A continuation of French 2. By course end, students are exposed to the fundamentals of French and have acquired a solid working vocabulary. Writing and speaking encouraged through class discussion and web-based and creative projects. Four days a week; in French.
FR 4. Intermediate French
(5) STAFF
Prerequisite: French 3.
First in the three-quarter intermediate French series. Builds on foundation established in first-year and includes thorough review of French grammar. Speaking and writing skills developed through exposure to French and Francophone culture, literature, and film. Four days a week; in French.
FR 5. Intermediate French
(5) STAFF
Prerequisite: French 4.
A continuation of French 4. Discussion encouraged through oral reports on such topics as Impressionist art and French film. Readings include poetry, plays, and short stories. Web-based activities add to the interest of the course. Four days a week; in French.
FR 6. Intermediate French
(5) STAFF
Prerequisite: French 5.
Continuation of French 5. Students complete their grammar review. Continued emphasis on speaking and writing through an examination of contemporary French culture, with exposure to some of the important trends in French intellectual history, notably Existentialism. Four days a week; in French.
FR 10B. Biological Topics in French
(1) STAFF
Prerequisite: French 4 or higher. Must be enrolled in another French class while taking French 10B.
Recommended Preparation: Some background in biology or related field. Minimum 3.0 GPA in French.
Enrollment Comments: Open to non-majors.
Introduces students of French with an interest in the biological sciences to the vocabulary and discursive conventions necessary to communicate effectively with French speakers in the life sciences, including medicine. Students work in groups on a collaborative project under the guidance of the instructor, resulting in an oral and written report. Final projects are presented in an event open to fellow students and professors. All sessions are conducted in French, and all work is to be completed in French.
FR 11A. French for Graduate Students
(4) STAFF
A service course for graduate students from other departments who need to satisfy language requirements. Divided into two levels: 11A (elementary) for those who have no, or hardly any knowledge of French; 11B (intermediate) open to students who have an appropriate level of knowledge of the language and to continuing students from 11A. Class meets twice weekly. Focus is on grammatical preparation and translation skills, not spoken fluency.
FR 11B. French for Graduate Students
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: French 11A or consent of instructor.
Enrollment Comments: A service course for graduate students from other departments who need tosatisfy language requirements.
(Intermediate) open to students who have an appropriate level of knowledge of the language and to continuing students from French 11A. Class meets twice weekly. Focus is on grammatical preparation and translation skills, not spoken fluency.
FR 34. Literatures of the Americas
(4) STAFF
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Comparative Literature 34.
An introduction to the diverse literary traditions of the Americas through an examination of selected works. Regional focus on North America, the Caribbean, and Latin America varies.
FR 40X. Memory: Bridging the Humanities and Neuroscience
(3) KOSIK, JULLIEN
Neuroscientists now ask some of the same profound questions posed by writers, artists and philosophers for centuries, thus opening surprising perspectives on memory and morality, dreams and perception, identity and agency. This course explores this emerging concordance.
FR 50AX. Tales of Love in the Western Tradition
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Writing 2.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Comparative Literature 50A.
A comparative and interdisciplinary approach to the literatures and philosophies of love, desire, and sexuality in the western world, in antiquity, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance. In English.
FR 50BX. Tales of Love in the Western Tradition
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Writing 2.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Comparative Literature 50B.
A comparative and interdisciplinary approach to the literatures and philosophies of love, desire, and sexuality in the western world in the 17th and 18th centuries. In English.
FR 50CX. Tales of Love in the Western Tradition
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Writing 2.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Comparative Literature 50C.
A comparative and interdisciplinary approach to the literatures and philosophies of love, desire, and sexuality in the western world in the 19th and 20th centuries. In English.
FR 50H. Tales of Love Honors
(1) BROWN, NESCI, STAFF
Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in French 50AX or 50BX or 50CX; honors students only; consent of instructor.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Comparative Literature 50H.
Repeat Comments: May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 3 units if student enrolls in French 50AX, 50BX, and 50CX.
Eligible students are invited to enroll in the honors seminar, which is generally taught by the course instructor.
FR 99. Independent Study
(1-4) STAFF
Prerequisite: French 3 with a minimum grade of B.
Enrollment Comments: Must have a minimum 3.0 GPA for preceding 3 quarters and are limited to 5 units per quarter and 30 units total in all 98/99/198/199/199AA-ZZ courses combined, with a max of 16 total units from FR 99.
Individual research project, supervised by a faculty member.
Collapse Courses Upper Division 
FR 100. Advanced Composition
(4) NESCI, SCHULTZ, ENDERS, PRIETO
Prerequisite: French 6; or French 6GS; or equivalent.
Enrollment Comments: Course formerly numbered French 26. French 100 is not open for credit to students who have completed French 26. French 100 may be used as a legal repeat of French 26.
Transitional course between lower-division language and upper-division literature/advanced culture courses. Students develop their writing and speaking skills through the study of contemporary French and Francophone literature, art and film. Includes a review of grammar. Prerequisite to all other upper-division courses taught in French.
FR 101A. Foundations of French and Francophone Culture
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: French 100 or French 26 or equivalent.
An introductory, interdisciplinary approach to the literary and cultural history of France and Francophone world from the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. Readings of poetry, drama, and fiction. Focus on advanced discussion and writing in French.
FR 101B. Foundations of French and Francophone Culture
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: French 100 or French 26 or equivalent.
An introductory, interdisciplinary approach to the literary and cultural history of France and Francophone world from the seventeenth century and the Enlightenment. Readings of poetry, drama, and fiction. Focus on advanced discussion and writing in French.
FR 101C. Foundations of French and Francophone Culture
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: French 100 or French 26 or equivalent.
An introductory, interdisciplinary approach to the literary and cultural history of France and the Francophone world from the nineteenth to the twenty-first century. Readings of poetry, drama, and fiction. Focus on advanced discussion and writing in French.
FR 104A. Expository Writing
(4) NESCI
Prerequisite: French 100 or French 26.
Course focuses on enhancing students' analytical skills through an examination of French rhetorical and argumentative modes. Reading of expository writing in literature, journalistic essays, political and philosophical works. Organized around such themes as relativism, tolerance, human rights, and women's rights.
FR 104B. Writing the Self
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: French 100 or French 26.
Readings in twentieth-century autobiography serving as models for creative writing. Coursework involves analysis of literary works and a long-term "autobiographical project" that may be factual or fictionalized.
FR 104C. Advanced French Grammar
(4) SCHULTZ
Prerequisite: French 100 or French 26 or equivalent.
Designed to provide a thorough review of the rules of French grammar and to situate the discussions within a linguistic context, covering topics such as linguistic signs and structure, semantics, syntax, and morphology.
FR 104D. Problems in French Linguistics
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: French 100 or French 26.
Recommended Preparation: Linguistics 20.
A few selected problems in the linguistic analysis of French are studied in depth. The specialized focus changes from year to year. Lectures and readings in French.
FR 104E. Business French 1
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: French 100 or French 26.
Study of specific vocabulary, formulae, and writing strategies useful for individual career objectives in the business world. Students will acquire a foundation in contemporary business and professional French, developed through the analysis and application of business concepts and the composition of analytic essays and business documents.
FR 104F. Business French 2
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: French 100 or French 26.
Students study essential aspects of the conduct of business in France, as well as specific features of the French language, both spoken and written, commonly encountered in business practice. Prepares students to take the (optional) competency exam for the Diplôme de français professionnel B2, which is offered annually by the Chambre de Commerce et d'Industrie de Paris (CCIP). The continuation of Business French 1, but not limited to students who have taken that course.
FR 107X. Second Language Acquisition
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as German 145.
An introduction to the theories and principles of how adults acquire a language other than their mother tongue; why it is more difficult than acquiring their first language, and what needs to be learned from linguistic, psychological and social perspectives.
FR 110. Rhetoric of Social Change
(4) ENDERS
Prerequisite: French 100.
From a transhistorical perspective (medieval to modern times), the study and analysis of French and Francophone authors who sought to change the world through their writings (political, legal, journalistic, literary, educational, etc.). In French.
FR 111. Greatest French Speeches
(4) ENDERS, LARUE
Prerequisite: French 100.
Rhetorical analysis of the history, theory, and practice of public speaking in France through texts and videos of great speeches that shaped French and Francophone culture (and beyond). Students also practice delivering their own speeches. In French.
FR 147A. French and Francophone Poetry
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: 1 course from French 101A-B-C and 1 course from 104A-B-C-D.
Study of poetic materials and technique. Analysis of the masterpieces of French poetry, including the French Renaissance with the "Ecole de Lyon" and the "Pléiade; Romanticism; Symbolist, Cubists, and Surrealist aesthetics. Content will vary from quarter to quarter. In French.
FR 147B. French and Francophone Theater
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: One course from French 101A-B-C and one course from 104A-B-C-D.
Study of the French theater from the seventeenth century to the present, with plays by Molière, Beaumarchais, Hugo, Musset, Ionesco, Beckett, and other playwrights. In French.
FR 147C. French and Francophone Prose Fiction
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: One course from French 101A-B-C and one course from 104A-B-C-D.
Introduction to the techniques of literary analysis for prose fiction. Study of the novel as a cultural form staging the major transformations in French-speaking literature and culture in the broad context of European and World history. In French.
FR 147D. Literary Translation: Theory and Practice
(4) JULLIEN, MALEUVRE
Prerequisite: French 100.
Exploration of the various theories of translation. Offers a practical component where students work on a specific translation project. Examination of literary, philosophical, linguistic and theoretical texts by Jakobson, Benjamin, Steiner, Derrida and others.
FR 148A. Law and Literature in the Middle Ages
(4) LARUE
Prerequisite: One course from French 101A-B-C and one course from 104A-B-C-D.
Not only does medieval literature represent and stage constant juridical proceedings (trials, ordeals, executions); law itself is often perceived as entertainment. Analyzing representative epic, theatrical, and legal texts, this course investigates the veritable spectacle of jurisprudence (including its contemporary ramifications).
FR 148B. Trials of Desire in the Middle Ages
(4) ENDERS
Prerequisite: One course from French 101A-B-C and one courses from 104A-B-C-D.
From Knightly jousting to romantic monologues to lyric debates about fidelity, numerous medieval characters fight about love. Focusing on Chretien de Troyes and the Troubadours, exploration of the literary and cultural ramifications of the representation of love as violent.
FR 148C. Women in the Middle Ages
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: One course from French 101A-B-C and one course from 104A-B-C-D.
A study of the socio-political role of women in France from the twelfth to the fifteenth centuries through an examination of their image in literary texts written by both sexes. Lectures and readings in French.
FR 148D. The New Individual in Renaissance Europe
(4) SKENAZI
Prerequisite: One course from French 101A-B-C and one course from 104 A-B-C-D
Discuss new ways of representing the individual, from Petrarch to Montaigne, and the values of the modern world that emerged with the Renaissance, which brought far-reaching changes in European culture from the fourteenth to the sixteenth centuries.
FR 148E. The Age of Louis XIV
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: One course from French 101A-B-C and one course from French 104A-B-C-D.
The development of literary genres between 1660 and 1680. Pascal, Racine, Moliere, La Fontaine, La Rochefoucauld, Mme de La Fayette studied as examples of that ideal which attempts a balance, through tension of mannerism and classicism. Discussions of art and architecture will supplement literary analysis. Lectures and readings in French.
FR 149A. The French Enlightenment
(4) MAURSETH
Prerequisite: One course from 101A-B-C and one course from 104A-B-C-D.
A reading of basic Enlightenment texts, stressing the fundamental works of Rousseau, Voltaire, Diderot, Laclos, and other major figures of the century. Lectures and reading in French.
FR 149B. The Politics of Paradise
(4) MAURSETH
Prerequisite: One course from French 101A-B-C and one course from French 104A-B-C-D.
Rousseau's two Discourses, The Social Contract, and Emile, along with Voltaire's Candide, Le Mondain, and other works are subjected to content analysis. Focus on rhetoric of utopia and its political infrastructure. Lectures and readings in French.
FR 149C. Reading Paris (1830-1890)
(4) JULLIEN, NESCI
Prerequisite: One course from French 101A-B-C and one course from 104A-B-C-D.
This course explores the literary and artistic representations of Paris and its Haussmannization. In works by Balzac, Baudelaire, Zola, Manet and the Impressionists, we explore the painting of modern life, Paris as revolution, and the rise of consumer culture.
FR 149D. French Postmodern Literature
(4) PRIETO
Prerequisite: One course from French 101A-B-C series and one course from 104A-B-C-D series.
This course is devoted to aspects of French poetry, fiction, and film since World War II, beginning with the New Novel and cinematic New Wave and then focusing on more contemporary writers of the late 20th and early 21st century.
FR 149E. Belgian Literature and Art
(4) SKENAZI
Prerequisite: One course from French 101A-B-C and one course from 104A-B-C-D.
A study of selected texts of nineteenth- and twentieth-century Belgian literature in relation to the visual arts of the period. Works by Maeterlinck, Verhaeren, Ghelderode. Lectures and readings in French.
FR 149F. Littératures de la Francophonie
(4) NESCI, PRIETO, SKENAZI
Prerequisite: One course from French 101A-B-C and one course from 104A-B-C-D.
Literature in French by writers outside France. Material includes representative authors and literary movements of Canada, Haiti, Senegal, Zaire, etc. discussion of questions of national identity and literary relations. Lectures and readings in French.
FR 151A. Medieval Urban Legends
(4) ENDERS
Prerequisite: French 100.
Spanning history, fiction, theology, folklore, and popular culture, urban legends remain an intriguing and enduring tradition. We explore and interpret French medieval legends (e.g., monsters and "snuff" drama) which reveal some surprising connections with their modern counterparts. In French.
FR 151B. Gender and Sexuality in France
(4) NESCI
Prerequisite: French 100.
Role of gender and the function of sexuality in the formation of identities in French culture. Themes of family, love, marriage, political and interpersonal relationships in literary texts, films, paintings, and diverse media.
FR 151C. French and Francophone Cinema
(4) JULLIEN,MALEUVRE,NESCI,PRIETO
Prerequisite: French 100.
Explore French-speaking cinema through a variety of social, geographic and philosophical themes. Topics may include the representation of history, and the counterpoint of text and image. Contents will vary according to the instructor.
FR 151D. Literature and the Visual Arts
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: One course from French 101A-B-C.
Focus on the cross-fertilization between literature and the visual arts in various periods. Topics include the rhetoric of images; the connections that link image and text in high and popular art; poetry and painting; art criticism, and hybrid forms such as comic strips.
FR 151E. Novels on the Screen
(4) JULLIEN
Prerequisite: One course from French 101A-B-C; and one course from 104A-B-C-D-E-F.
A comparative study of some of the great French and Francophone novels, alongside their adaptations for the silver screen. What does it mean to adapt a literary text for the cinema? Works studied will include: Balzac, Le colonel Chabert, Flaubert, Madame Bovary, and Zobel, La rue Cases-Nègres, as well as notable adaptations of these works by Angelo, Renoir, Chabrol, Palcy, and others. Lectures and readings in French, films in French (with English subtitles).
FR 151F. Sociology of French Popular Culture
(4) LARUE
Prerequisite: French 100.
Repeat Comments: French 151F is not open for credit to students who have completed French 156E.
Through the study of sociological essays and popular arts such as films, songs, TV shows, and cartoons, the course examines some features of contemporary France that range from longstanding cultural habits to burning political debates about social mobility, immigration, secularism, globalization, the role of the state, etc. Taught in French.
FR 151G. Globalization and Development in the Francosphere
(4) PRIETO
Prerequisite: One course from French 101A-B-C; and one course from French 104A-B-C-D-E-F.
Repeat Comments: French 151G is not open for credit to students who have completed French 154L and the courses may not be taken concurrently.
Examines the postcolonial history of several Francophone nations in the developing world, emphasizing the interplay between the political, economic, social, and cultural spheres. Specific cases studied will vary. Students develop their own policy-oriented class project. Taught in French.
FR 151I. Bioethics in France and the Francosphere
(4) LARUE
Prerequisite: One course from French 101A-B-C; and one course from 104A-B-C-D-E-F.
Repeat Comments: French 151I is not open for credit to students who have completed French 154K and the courses may not be taken concurrently.
An introduction to pressing contemporary issues and debates concerning bioethics in France and the Francosphere. Discusses issues such as euthanasia, genetic engineering, artificial intelligence, animal experiments and transhumanism, and culminates in the presentation and defense of student-devised projects. Taught in French.
FR 151J. French for Life and Social Sciences
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: French 6 or equivalent; French 100 (may be taken concurrently).
Enrollment Comments: Open to non-majors.
Project-based course designed to introduce students with an interest in life and/or social sciences to discipline-specific vocabulary and professional conventions necessary to communicate effectively with French speakers in the life and social sciences, including biology, psychology, and medicine. Students work in groups on a collaborative project of their design under the guidance of the instructor, resulting in an oral and written report. Final projects are presented in an event open to fellow students and professors. All sessions are conducted in French, and all work is to be completed in French.
FR 151K. Learning French: Culture, Language, Methods
(4) SCHULTZ
Prerequisite: French 100 or equivalent (may be taken concurrently with instructor's approval).
Covers three basic areas important to students interested in language acquisition, particularly for French. These include 1) the interpretation of culturally embedded visual, written, and oral texts; 2) the analysis of French linguistic structure; 3) the psychology of language learning and effective pedagogical methods. Emphasis on intercultural communication and semiotic interpretation. Taught in French.
FR 151R. French for International Relations and Diplomacy
(4) SCHULTZ
Prerequisite: FR 100, FR 101, and FR 104.
This course focuses on French perspectives of two organizations dedicated to international relations, the United Nations and the European Union. The analysis of both organizations, which have very different goals, institutions, and agendas, lays the groundwork for an exploration of French diplomatic relations. Students engage in two "model UN" and "model EU" activities for increased understanding of the finer points of international relations and diplomacy. Students also write two "notes de synthèse," essentially short formal papers summarizing a political situation. One midterm and one final exam. Taught in French.
FR 153A. Studies in Medieval Literature
(4) ENDERS
Prerequisite: Writing 2 or upper-division standing.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as English 119X.
A study of one or more major medieval works in translation such as The Song of Roland, the romances of Chretien de Troyes, the Lais of Marie de France,or The Romance of the Rose.
FR 153B. French Theatre in Translation
(4) SKENAZI
A study of French theatre through the centuries, considered within the cultural context of the day (Classicism, the Enlightenment, Romanticism, the Absurd, etc). Plays by Molière, Marivaux, Beaumarchais, Hugo, Musset, Ionesco, and Beckett. Lectures and readings in English.
FR 153C. Autobiographies and Life Stories
(4) JULLIEN, MALEUVRE
French autobiographies in translation, from Rousseau, Chateaubriand and Sand to Colette, Sartre, Sarraute, Perec, Duras and Nothomb. Topics include autobiography and self-portrait, autobiography and fiction, the portrayal of childhood and family, women's autobiography. Content will vary according to the instructor.
FR 153D. Fantasy and the Fantastic
(4) JULLIEN
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Comparative Literature 191.
Course explores the creation of a space where a fantastic perception of reality developed and thrived, hesitating between the real and the supernatural, in the intermediate space of the unexplained and unexplainable. Works by Balzac, Poe, Stevenson, James, and Borges.
FR 153E. The Power of Negative Thinking: Sartre, Adorno, and Marcuse
(4) STURM
Critical perspectives on man and culture by three of the great myth-shattering thinkers of the century. Topics: the social function of art, the Freudian legacy, utopia revisited, work and play, etc. In English.
FR 153F. Existentialist Literature in Translation
(4) STAFF
How much freedom can you take? The course explores the quandaries of the twentieth-century individual, free and self-created, in the world of responsibilities and attachments. Readings include fiction, drama, and philosophical essays by Jean-Paul Sartre, Albert Camus, Simone de Beauvoir.
FR 154A. Voyages to the Unknown
(4) SKENAZI
Prerequisite: Writing 2 or equivalent
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Comparative Literature 107.
The impact of the voyages of discovery on late 15th- and 16th- century Europe. Readings on real and imaginary voyages: Columbus, Cartier, Lery, More, Rabelais, Montaigne.
FR 154B. Creativity in Renaissance Europe
(4) SKENAZI
Explores the renewed sense of human achievement and limitation in Renaissance Europe. Focus on the meanings of creativity in the religious, philosophical and artistic contexts of the time. Authors include Petrarch, Pico Della Mirandola, Erasmus, Castiglione, Ronsard, Montaigne.
FR 154C. France in the Sixteenth Century
(4) BERNSTEIN
Prerequisite: History 2B or 4B or 9 or upper-division standing.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as History 121C.
Politics, religion, society and culture in France from the reign of François I to Henri IV. Topics include the French Renaissance, religious divisions and civil war, kingship and local authority, family and social hierarchy, and France's relations beyond its borders.
FR 154D. Torture: Theory, History, Practice
(4) ENDERS
An investigation into the history of torture from classical antiquity to Amnesty International. Discussions focus on its interrelations with literature, law, art history, gender, and violence in the media. Guest lecturers, as available.
FR 154E. Holocaust in France
(4) DERWIN, NESCI
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Comparative Literature 122B.
Through analysis of testimonies, memoirs, fiction, and film, this course focuses on France under the Nazi occupation. Topics include the Vichy Regime (1940-1945), The Resistance Movement, the Church under Vichy, anti-Semitism, deportations and concentration camp imprisonment, and national memory after World War II.
FR 154F. Time Off in Paris!
(4) JULLIEN,NESCI,PRIETO,SCHULTZ
Enrollment Comments: Not open for credit to students who have completed French 169BX.
Paris and Parisian life in nineteenth- and twentieth-century literature, art and cinema. Drawing upon history, architecture, and art history, we explore the shock of urbanization, the relations between the culture and life of the city, and the rise of avant-garde aesthetics.
FR 154G. Post-Colonial Cultures
(4) PRIETO
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Comparative Literature 171.
Study of fiction from the Caribbean, West Africa, and the Maghreb. Born of the conflict between and hybridization of widely differing cultural traditions, this course provides insights into the vibrancy of contemporary post-colonial societies, the ongoing legacy of colonialism, and the meaning of multiculturalism. In English.
FR 154H. Honors Section
(1) STAFF
Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in one of the French 154 series; honors standing.
Eligible students are invited to enroll in the honors seminar, which is generally taught by the course instructor.
FR 154I. Economic Fictions: Literature, Film, and Theory
(4) MALEUVRE
Prerequisite: Upper division standing.
How have Western thinkers represented economic concepts since the eighteenth century? Themes may include free market liberalism, labor theories of value, household and family economics, currency/monetary policy, associationism/socialism, globalism/expansionism/colonialism, protectionism, and others. In English.
FR 154J. Medicine and Comedy
(4) ENDERS
Prerequisite: Upper division standing.
Medical comedy? Surgical theater? From ancient Greece through the twenty-first century, doctors, patients, and diseases have been staged for comic and cathartic effect at the same time that they transmit serious medical knowledge: all with a big laugh. In English.
FR 154K. Bioethics in France and the Francosphere
(4) LARUE
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Repeat Comments: French 154K is not open for credit to students who have completed French 151I and the courses may not be taken concurrently.
An introduction to pressing contemporary issues and debates concerning bioethics in France and the Francosphere. Discusses issues such as euthanasia, genetic engineering, artificial intelligence, animal experiments and transhumanism, and culminates in the presentation and defense of student-devised projects. Taught in English.
FR 154L. Globalization and Development in the Francosphere
(4) PRIETO
Prerequisite: Upper division standing.
Repeat Comments: French 154L is not open for credit to students who have completed French 151G and the courses may not be taken concurrently.
Examines the postcolonial history of several Francophone nations in the developing world, emphasizing the interplay between the political, economic, social, and cultural spheres. Specific cases studied will vary. Students develop their own policy-oriented class project. Taught in English.
FR 155A. Women in the Middle Ages
(4) ENDERS
A study of the socio-political role of women in France from the twelfth to the fifteenth centuries through an examination of their image in literary texts written by both sexes. Lectures and readings in English.
FR 155B. Women on Trial
(4) ENDERS
Prerequisite: Upper division standing.
A transhistorical study of the cultural construction of femininity through an examination of legal proceedings (actual and literary) in France initiated by or against women for such "crimes" as witchcraft, adultery, pride, theft, and seduction. In English.
FR 155C. French and Francophone Women Writers
(4) JULLIEN, NESCI, SCHULTZ
French-speaking women writers from the Middle Ages to the present. Gender and genre, politics and poetics in Marie de France, Lafayette, Staël, Sand, Simone de Beauvoir, Marguerite Duras, Assia Djebar, among other writers. In English.
FR 155D. Citoyennes! Women and Politics in Modern France
(4) NESCI
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Feminist Studies 171CN.
Focuses on women's fights for the rights of equality and liberty, their exclusion from the public sphere and their access to citizenship (1789-2001). Women's evolving personal and collective aspirations, and the creation of a republican womanhood in modern culture. Taught in English.
FR 156A. French Cinema: History and Theory
(4) MALEUVRE, NESCI
Enrollment Comments: Not open for credit to students who have completed French 178X.
History of French cinema from 1895-present, covering the silent period, the early classic era, the war years, and the New Wave, with a survey of the major French film theories since the 1920s. In English.
FR 156C. Modern Images of the Middle Ages: The Intersection of Text, History, and Film
(4) ENDERS
Modern images of the Middle Ages: the intersection of text, history, and film. Course will examine major cultural aspects of the Middle Ages, including courtly love, the Arthurian myth, the legend of Robin Hood, witchcraft, scholasticism, the Inquisition, war and death, through the dual optic of medieval literature and modern film. Taught in English.
FR 156D. Technology and Cinema
(4) STAFF
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Film Studies 178Z.
Cinema fulfills and breaks down the technological project of "framing" the whole of existence. Themes: humanity and/as technological threat, the decline of language and ethics, the culture industry, science fiction. Screenings include Tarkovsky, Kubrick, Star Wars, Marker, Godard, Melies, Lang. Lectures and readings in English.
FR 156E. Sociology of French Popular Culture
(4) LARUE
Prerequisite: Upper division standing.
Repeat Comments: French 156E is not open for credit to students who have completed French 151F.
Through the study of sociological essays and popular arts such as films, songs, TV shows, and cartoons, the course examines some features of contemporary France that range from longstanding cultural habits to burning political debates about social mobility, immigration, secularism, globalization, the role of the state, etc. Taught in English.
FR 162A. Public Speaking in French
(4) ENDERS, SCHULTZ, LARUE
Prerequisite: French 100 or equivalent.
Participants develop multiple opportunities to practice eloquent oral communication in the French language (e.g. for the classroom, sociopolitical advocacy, the workplace). Extensive work in rhetorical analysis provides the basis for their own enhanced professional fluency and development. In French.
FR 189. Narrative in the First Person
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Repeat Comments: Can only be repeated if being offered by a different instructor.
Autobiography, memoir, lyric, testimony & many fictional works are written in the first-person. This course considers the relationship between first-person narrators, their audiences, and the worlds from which these narrators emerge. Texts and course focus vary with the instructor.
FR 195H. Honors Independent Studies in French
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; 24 upper-division units in French.
Enrollment Comments: Students must have a cumulative 3.5 for the proceeding 3 quarter(s). Designed for majors. Students must have a minimum 3.5 GPA for the preceding 3 quarters.
Individual investigations in literary or linguistics fields in fulfillment of Senior Honors Thesis for French Major.
FR 197. Senior Seminar
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Senior standing or 6 upper division courses in French.
As a culmination of study in the major, this seminar enables students to synthesize knowledge gained in French courses, both at UCSB and through the Education Abroad Program. It involves investigations of theoretical issues related to French literature and culture.
FR 197H. Senior Seminar, Honors Section
(1) STAFF
Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in French 197; honors standing
Enrollment Comments: Designed for majors. Concurrently offered with 197.
Eligible students are invited to enroll in the honors section, which is taught by the course instructor. It involves discussion of selected texts, students' presentations, and the completion of an independent project on any aspect of the course's chosen theme.
FR 198. Senior Honors Seminar
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor; honors standing.
This seminar is concurrently offered with graduate seminars. It is designed to expand research skills through an investigation of theoretical issues and readings of both literary and critical texts. It involves extensive research, sophisticated analysis, and creative reflection. In French.
FR 199. Independent Studies in French
(1-5) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; completion of 2 upper-division courses in French.
Enrollment Comments: Must have a minimum 3.0 GPA for preceding 3 quarters and are limited to 5 units per quarter and 30 units total in all 98/99/198/199/199AA-ZZ courses combined, with a max of 16 total units from FR 199.
Individual investigations in literary or linguistics fields.
FR 199RA. Independent Research Assistance
(1-5) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; completion of 2 upper-division courses in French; consent of instructor.
Enrollment Comments: Students must have a minimum 3.0 GPA for the preceding 3 quarters and are limited to 5 units per quarter and 30 units total in all 98/99/198/199/199AA-ZZ courses combined.
Independent research, under the supervision of a consenting faculty member.
Collapse Courses Graduate 
FR 202. Introduction to French Studies
(2) STAFF
Enrollment Comments: Designed for majors. Quarters usually offered: Fall. Required of all Frenchgraduate students. Normally taken in fall quarter of entering academic year.
This proseminar includes presentations and discussions by faculty of research areas that compose the field of French literary studies and its interdisciplinary components. Students will be introduced to research methodologies, including those requiring historical and bibliographic investigation.
FR 226AAZZ. Literary and Critical Theory
(4) STAFF
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit provided the letter designation is different.
Comparative examination of contemporary continental philosophy and of the canonical texts that have defined literary criticism and cultural theory. Critical reevaluation of the field of French studies.
FR 226B. Feminist Theory and Gender Studies
FR 226E. Literary and Critical Theory
FR 227AAZZ. Medieval and Renaissance Studies
(4) ENDERS, SKENAZI
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit provided the letter designation is different.
Close literary investigation and cultural analysis (theoretical, rhetorical, codicological, artistic, performative, political and religious) of the most exciting literature and critical trends in this burgeoning field.
FR 227A. Introduction to Old French
FR 227B. Courtly Love and Courtly Romance
FR 227C. Medieval Theater and Theatricality
FR 227D. Late Medieval Textuality and Poetic Authority
FR 227F. Religion and Skepticism in Renaissance Europe
FR 227H. Irony in the Renaissance
FR 228AAZZ. Seventeenth and Eighteenth-Century Studies
(4) STAFF
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit provided the letter designation is different.
Study of early modern French literature at a time of cultural and political transformation. Practice of theoretical approaches to early modern aesthetics, from Baroque and Classical theater and philosophy to Enlightenment fiction and epistemology.
FR 228A. Classical Tragedy
FR 228B. Classical Comedy
FR 228C. Les Moralistes
FR 228D. Topics in the French Classical Age
FR 228E. The Libertine Novel
FR 228F. "Les Lumières": Fiction and Philosophy
FR 228G. Topics in Enlightenment Studies
FR 229AAZZ. Modern and Contemporary Studies
(4) STAFF
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit provided the letter designation is different.
Close readings of nineteenth and twentieth-century literary texts; multi-disciplinary inquiry into the art and character of modernity. Practice of critical approaches for achieving an understanding of the literary, cultural, and social aspects of modernity and post-modernity.
FR 229A. Studies in the Novel
FR 229AS. Modern and Contemporary Studies
FR 229B. The Theory of Fantastic Literature
FR 229BN. Modern and Contemporary Studies
FR 229C. Poetry and Poetics
FR 229E. Autobiography, Autoportrait, Autofiction
FR 229F. Topics in Modernism
FR 229G. Modern and Contemporary Studies
FR 230AAZZ. Post-colonial and Francophone Studies
(4) STAFF
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit provided the letter designation is different.
Study of the literature and culture from French-speaking countries around the world, with emphasis on post-colonial politics and interactions between widely divergent cultural traditions. Theoretical examination of the epistemological issues raised by the introduction of non-Western perspectives.
FR 230B. Francophone Literature: The Caribbean
FR 230E. Literature of Immigration and the Minority Experience
FR 231AAZZ. Cultural Studies and Intellectual History
(4) STAFF
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit provided the letter designation is different.
Analyses of literary, historical and philosophical readings that have shaped the ways in which French and European writers represent the human experience of time and space. Close look at the political, moral, and philosophical functions of art and literature.
FR 231A. The French Nation
FR 231AZ. Game and Literature: historical, cultural and theoretical approaches
FR 231B. Modernity and the City
FR 231C. Literature and Travel
FR 231E. Poetics and Politics of Place
FR 231F. World Literature: the Intellectual and the Republic of Letters
FR 231G. Questioning Animality
FR 231J. Cultural Studies and Intellectual History
FR 231NN. Europe's Visions of the Orient
FR 232AAZZ. Literature, Science, and the Arts
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit provided the letter designation is different.
Interdisciplinary studies of the cross-fertilization between literature, the performative and visual arts,and other disciplines.
FR 232B. Literature and the Visual Arts
FR 232C. The Medieval Book as Literary Artifact
FR 232D. French Film and Theory
FR 232E. Literature and Science
FR 232F. Music and Literature
FR 232GG. Desire in French
FR 279. Contemporary Theory in Translation
(4) SNYDER
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
Survey of the principal issues of contemporary theory. Readings range from classic texts by Adorno, Bakhtin, Benjamin, Cixous, Foucault, Heidegger et al. to recent essays in the new cultural studies. In English.
FR 299. Topics in Applied Linguistics
(4) STAFF
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Education 299, German 299, Linguistics 299, and Spanish 299.
Repeat Comments: May be repeated for credit.
Specialized topics in the study of applied linguistics.
FR 500. Apprentice Teaching
(4) SCHULTZ, STAFF
Enrollment Comments: Units earned in this course, which is required of all teaching assistants, do not apply toward degree.
Includes orientation week, weekly meetings with supervisor, preparation of examinations, class visitations and discussions, and occasional workshops.
FR 596. Directed Reading and Research
(2-12) STAFF
Prerequisite: Graduate standing; consent of instructor.
Individual tutorial. Instructor is usually student's thesis advisor. Students doing initial research on the doctoral dissertation may sign up for this course.
FR 596SS. Directed Reading and Research
(2-6) STAFF
Individual tutorial. Instructor is usually student's major professor. Students doing initial research on the doctoral dissertation may sign up for this course.
FR 597. Independent Study
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Consent of graduate advisor.
Individual research projects, supervised by a faculty member. Requires permission of graduate adviser to enroll.
FR 598SS. Master's Thesis
(2-6) STAFF
Under the supervision of the director, third-summer student will write a thesis incorporating written works produced and approved during the previous two summers.
FR 599. Dissertation Research and Preparation
(1-12) STAFF
Reserved for writing of the doctoral dissertation once the student has advanced to candidacy. Instructor should be chair of student's doctoral committee. A progress report must be turned in in order to receive a satisfactory grade for the course.

 
Italian
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Collapse Courses Lower Division 
ITAL 1. Elementary Italian
(5) STAFF
Enrollment Comments: Comments: No credit can be earned if more advanced credit in the language has been awarded. If earned grade of C- or lower in Italian 1HY, then Italian 1 can be used as a legal repeat.
Introduction to the most basic elements of Italian grammar. Articles, adjectives, gender. Verbs in the present tense.
ITAL 1HY. Elementary Italian 1 Hybrid
(5) PADULA
Enrollment Comments: No credit can be earned if more advanced credit in the language has alreadybeen awarded. If earned a grade of C- or lower in Italian 1, then Italian 1HY can be used as a legal repeat.
Beginning Italian in areas of grammar and basic language skills. Face-to-face classroom contact combined with online work. ITAL 1HY, ITAL 2HY, and ITAL 3HY form a three-course series equivalent to ITAL 1, 2, & 3, Elementary Italian series.
ITAL 2. Elementary Italian
(5) STAFF
Prerequisite: Italian 1 or equivalent.
Enrollment Comments: No credit can be earned if more advanced credit in the language has alreadybeen awarded. If earned a grade of C- or lower in Italian 2HY, then Italian2 can be used as a legal repeat.
Logical continuation of Italian 1. Direct and indirect pronouns. Verbs in the past tense and the imperfect. Emphasis on the correct writing and speaking of Italian.
ITAL 2HY. Elementary Italian 2 Hybrid
(5) PADULA
Prerequisite: Completion of Italian 1 or Italian 1HY with a grade of P or a grade of C or higher.
Enrollment Comments: No credit can be earned if more advanced credit in the language has alreadybeen awarded. If earned a grade of C- or lower in Italian 2, then Italian 2HY can be used as a legal repeat.
Continuation of ITAL 1HY in areas of grammar and basic language skills. Face-to-face classroom contact combined with online work. ITAL 1HY, 2HY, and 3HY form a three-course series equivalent to the ITAL 1, 2, and 3 or ITAL 16A and 16B Elementary Italian series.
ITAL 3. Elementary Italian
(5) STAFF
Prerequisite: Italian 2 or equivalent.
Enrollment Comments: No credit can be earned if more advanced credit in the language has alreadybeen awarded. If earned a grade of C- or lower in Italian 3HY, then Italian3 can be used as a legal repeat.
Continuation of Italian 2. Verbs in the future, conditional. Introduction to subjunctive. Further emphasis on the correct writing and speaking of Italian.
ITAL 3HY. Elementary Italian 3 Hybrid
(5) PADULA
Prerequisite: Completion of Italian 2 or Italian 2HY with a grade of P or a grade of C or higher.
Enrollment Comments: No credit can be earned if more advanced credit in the language has alreadybeen awarded. If earned a grade of C- or lower in Italian 3, then Italian 3HY can be used as a legal repeat.
Continuation of ITAL 2HY in areas of grammar and basic language skills. Face-to-face classroom contact combined with online work. ITAL 1HY, 2HY, and 3HY form a three-course series equivalent to ITAL 1, 2, and 3 or ITAL 16A and 16B, Elementary Italian series.
ITAL 4. Intermediate Italian
(5) STAFF
Prerequisite: Italian 3; or Italian 16B.
Intended to develop the linguistic skills of students who have completed the first year. Review of basic grammar structures with emphasis on exceptions, enrichment of vocabulary, reading comprehension, and discussion of modern short stories. In Italian.
ITAL 5. Intermediate Italian
(5) STAFF
Prerequisite: Italian 4.
Increases the students' reading, writing, and speaking skills. Review of more complex grammar structures through written exercises, enrichment of vocabulary, reading comprehension and discussion of contemporary short stories. In Italian.
ITAL 6. Intermediate Italian
(5) STAFF
Prerequisite: Italian 5.
Further develops the students' reading, writing, and speaking skills. Intensive review of the most advanced grammar structures: subjunctive, passive voice, indirect discourse. Reading and discussion of contemporary short stories. In Italian.
ITAL 8A. Italian Conversation
(2) STAFF
Prerequisite: Italian 1 or equivalent.
Enrollment Comments: Not open to native speakers of Italian.
Improves comprehension and conversational skills through the discussion of contemporary issues selected by the instructor.
ITAL 8B. Italian Conversation
(2) STAFF
Prerequisite: Italian 1 or equivalent.
Enrollment Comments: Not open to native speakers of Italian.
Improves comprehension and conversational skills through the discussion of contemporary issues selected by the instructor.
ITAL 16A. Italian for Spanish Speakers I
(5) STAFF
Prerequisite: 1 year of college Spanish; or 3 years of high school Spanish; or be native or heritage speaker of Spanish.
Intensive introductory course sequence on the fundamentals of speaking, reading, writing, and comprehending Italian, with an emphasis on structural similarities between Italian and Spanish. This 2-course sequence covers the first full year of Italian.
ITAL 16B. Italian for Spanish Speakers II
(5) STAFF
Prerequisite: Italian 16A with a grade of P or a grade of C or higher; or ITA1 and ITA2 with one year of college Spanish or 3 years of high school Spanish; or be native or heritage speaker of Spanish.
Repeat Comments: Not open to heritage or native speakers of Italian. Not open for credit tostudents with credit in ITAL 3.
Intensive introductory course sequence on the fundamentals of speaking, reading, writing, and comprehending Italian, with an emphasis on structural similarities between Italian and Spanish. This 2-course sequence covers the first full year of Italian.
ITAL 20X. Introduction to Italian Culture
(4) STAFF
A sweeping inquiry into Italian culture, from its origins to its current trends. Exploration of the media, sports, gastronomy, art, music, politics, language, regional and ethnic identity, sexuality, the family, and urban life. Taught in English.
ITAL 20XH. Introduction to Italian Culture, Honors
(1) STAFF
Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Italian 20X; honors students only; consent of instructor.
(Taught in English) Eligible students are invited to enroll in the honors seminar, which is generally taught by the course instructor.
ITAL 30X. Italy in Film
(4) STAFF
An introduction to the great directors of the Italian cinema including Rossellini, de Sica, Fellini, Visconti, Antonioni, Pasolini, Rosi, and Pontecorvo. Overview of the chief social and aesthetic issues of postwar Europe. Taught in English (films subtitled).
Collapse Courses Upper Division 
ITAL 101. Advanced Reading and Composition: Modern Italy
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Italian 6 or equivalent
Enrollment Comments: Designed for majors.
(Taught in Italian) Interdisciplinary introduction to modern Italian culture, art, and society from unification (1870) to the present, through readings, oral presentations, and composition. Advanced grammar topics are coordinated with cultural themes, such as nationalism, war, religion and politics.
ITAL 102. Advanced Reading and Composition: Medieval and Renaissance Italy
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Italian 6 or equivalent
Enrollment Comments: Designed for majors.
(Taught in Italian) Interdisciplinary introduction to Medieval and Renaissance Italian culture, art, and society, through readings, oral presentations, and composition. Advanced grammar topics are coordinated with cultural themes, such as courtly love, the development of Italian city-states, humanism, the role of women, art and artists.
ITAL 103. Advanced Communication in Italian: Mobility, Travel, and Tourism
(4) FIORINA
Prerequisite: Italian 6 or equivalent.
Enrollment Comments: Open to non-majors.
(Taught in Italian) Interdisciplinary introduction to contemporary Italian culture and society through readings, movies, oral presentations, and cross-disciplinary and multimedia projects. Advanced grammar topics are coordinated with cultural themes, such as mobility, travel, and tourism in modern Italy.
ITAL 109. Advanced Italian Conversation
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Italian 5. Concurrent enrollment in Italian 6 or upper-division standing.
Enrollment Comments: Concurrently offered.
(Taught in Italian) Discussion of contemporary issues selected by the instructor. Emphasis on idiomatic speech and vocabulary building.
ITAL 111. Italian Short Fiction
(4) FOGU, STAFF
Prerequisite: Italian 101 or 102.
(Taught in Italian) A study of the briefest forms of Italian narrative fiction ranging from the exemplum to the TV script, the short story, and the novella, leading to an exercise in creative writing in Italian.
ITAL 112. Italian Narrative Fiction
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Italian 101 or 102.
(Taught in Italian) A study of the longer forms of Italian narrative fiction, particularly the prose romance and the novel.
ITAL 114X. Dante's "Divine Comedy"
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing or instructor approval.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Religious Studies 114X
(Taught in English) Dante's masterpiece, The Divine Comedy, remains among the most astonishing works of world literature. This course follows the pilgram's progress through Inferno, Pergatorio and Paradiso in search of "love that moves the sun and the other stars."
ITAL 119A. The Art of Translation
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Italian 1-6 or equivalent
Recommended Preparation: Italian 101 or 102.
Enrollment Comments: Open to non-majors. Designed for majors.
(Taught in Italian) An intensive workshop exploring the theory and practice of translation. Students work at translating literary texts from Italian to English and vice versa.
ITAL 119B. Italian Culture in Translation
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Italian 1-6 or equivalent
Recommended Preparation: Italian 101 or 102.
Enrollment Comments: Designed for majors.
(Taught in Italian) Focuses on forms of cultural translation between Italy and America. Examples of these translations: American travelers in Italy to nineteenth-century translators of Dante, from emigrant culture to the mafia to the 'spaghetti' western to Italian hip-hop.
ITAL 119X. Found in Translation: Transnational Italian Culture
(4) FOGU, HOM
Recommended Preparation: ITAL 20X or ITAL 120X
This course explores the cross-cultural constructions and hybridizations of Italian-ness from abroad and by foreign-born visitors or residents of Italy from the Grand Tour (18th century) to the present. Topics include: tourism, travel literature, Spaghetti Westerns, cinema and mafia, and Italian theme parks. (Taught in English).
ITAL 120X. Transnational Italian Studies
(4) FOGU, HOM
Recommended Preparation: ITAL 20X or ITAL 120X
An introduction to transnational identity formation through examples of how both Italians abroad and foreign constructions of Italian-ness have contributed to the formation of Italian culture and identity from the age of the Grand Tour to the present.
ITAL 121. The Art of Italian Drama (Page to Stage)
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Italian 101 or 102
(Taught in Italian) Intensive study of a single text for the Italian theater leading to its staging in the original language with students as actors.
ITAL 123X. Italian Opera
(4) STAFF
Studies Italian operas, from the eighteenth to the twentieth centuries. Students learn to appreciate these musical masterpieces as literary works as well, through analyzing plots, studying the librettos, and listening to the music. In English.
ITAL 124. Italian Theater
(4) FOGU
Prerequisite: Italian 101 or 102.
(Taught in Italian) A study of the most important Italian theatrical texts and practices from the Renaissance comedy and the "commedia dell'arte" to contemporary works for the stage.
ITAL 124X. Italian Theatre
(4) FOGU
Prerequisite: Upper Division standing.
A study of the most important Italian theatrical texts and practices from the Renaissance comedy and the commedia dell'arte to contemporary works for the stage. In English.
ITAL 126AAZZ. Literature in Italian
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Italian 101 or 102.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 16 units provided letter designations are different.
The literatures of Italy do not constitute a single canon but include many overlooked regional, migrant,and postcolonial texts all written in various forms of Italian. Consult the department for specific topics.
ITAL 126A. Literature in Italian
ITAL 126AA. Literature in Italian
ITAL 126BB. Literature in Italian
ITAL 126DD. Literature in Italian
ITAL 126EE. Literature in Italian
ITAL 130X. Holocaust in Italy
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper Division Standing
Through readings of memoir, fiction, and film, this course investigates the fate of Jews under the Italian Fascists of Benito Mussolini (1922-1945). Topics include Fascism, Communism, anti-Semitism, Italian cooperation with the Nazis, the Catholic Church, the Resistance Movement, deportations and extermination camps, and individual / collective memory after World War II. Students will be exposed to great literary and cinematographic works and through them develop a thorough understanding of this pivotal period in modern Italian history.
ITAL 138AAZZ. Made in Italy
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Italian 6 or equivalent.
Recommended Preparation: Italian 101 or 102.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 16 units provided letter designation is different.
(Taught in Italian) An interdisciplinary study of the ways in which representational practices (texts, images, sounds) have affected Italian culture over the ages.
ITAL 138A. Cultural Representations in Italy
ITAL 138AA. Interrogating the Real: Italian Literature & Cinema from Realism to VirtualReality
ITAL 138D. Representing the South
ITAL 138F. Futurism
ITAL 138N. Cultural Representations in Italy
ITAL 138T. Italy as Destination: Italian Travel Literature
ITAL 139AAZZ. Transnational Italian Culture
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper division standing.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 16 units provided letter designation is different.
(Taught in English) A super series of lecture courses taught from an interdisciplinary and transnational perspective, focusing on representational practices (texts, images, sounds) from within and without Italy that have contributed to the formation of Italian identities, and or ideas of Italian-ness over the ages.
ITAL 139CX. Italian Colonialism
ITAL 139DX. Representing the South
ITAL 139EX. The Southern Question
ITAL 139FX. Gastronomic Italy: Italian Food Culture in Transnational Perspective
ITAL 139GX. Emigrant Nation and Charisma in the Making of Italians
ITAL 139HX. Asia and Italy: From the Silk Road to Weibo
ITAL 139IX. Italia-Stile: the Transnational Creation of Made in Italy
ITAL 139TX. Italy as Destination: Italian Travel Literature
ITAL 139YX. Biopolitics and Medical Humanities
ITAL 139ZX. Crime Italian Style
ITAL 142. Women in Italy
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Italian 6 or equivalent.
Recommended Preparation: Italian 101 or 102.
(Taught in Italian) An intensive study of writing by and about women from the early modern and modern eras.
ITAL 142X. Women in Italy
(4) STAFF
An intensive study of writing by and about women from the early modern and modern eras. In English.
ITAL 144AAZZ. Women in Italy
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Italian 6 or equivalent.
Recommended Preparation: Italian 101 or 102.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 8 units provided letter designations are different.
TAUGHT IN ITALIAN. Studies in the production of gender and the functions of sexuality in Italian culture including plays, films, painting, and literary texts.
ITAL 144A. Women, Gender, and Sexuality in Italy
ITAL 144AA. Women in Italy
ITAL 144AX. Gender and Sexuality in Italian Culture
ITAL 144BB. Gender and Sexuality in Italian Culture
ITAL 145AAZZ. Gender and Sexuality in Italian Culture
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper division standing.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 8 units provided letter designations are different.
TAUGHT IN ENGLISH. Studies in the production of gender and the functions of sexuality in Italian culture including plays, films, painting, and literary texts.
ITAL 145AX. Gender and Sexuality in Italian Culture
ITAL 148X. Cities of Italy
(4) FOGU
A close-up look at the great texts, histories, and cultures of Italian cities such as Rome, Venice, Florence, Ferrara, and Naples. In English.
ITAL 160. Senior Seminar
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Italian 101 or 102.
Seminar for Italian majors wishing to participate in intensive study of a major work of Italian culture (filmic, literary, or artistic) of the past or present. See department for further information.
ITAL 161X. The European Union
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: POLS 7
Enrollment Comments: Same course as POL S 145.
Introduction to the history and organization of the European Union (the institutions, policies, goals, and successes of the EU). Focus on the ongoing process of economical, political, social, and cultural integration in Europe since the Second World War. In English.
ITAL 178. Italian Cinema
(4) FOGU
Prerequisite: Italian 6 or equivalent and Upper-division standing.
Recommended Preparation: Italian 101 or 102.
Enrollment Comments: Not open for credit to students who have completed Italian 178.
(Taught in Italian) Contemporary Italian cinema from neorealism to the present, in light of the themes of Mafia, Camorra, 'ndrangheta.
ITAL 179X. Italian History in Fiction and Film
(4) FOGU
(Taught in English) A course focusing on and comparing the representation of Italian history in film and literature.
ITAL 180X. Italian Cinema
(4) FOGU
Prerequisite: Upper-Division Standing only
Enrollment Comments: Formerly offered as ITAL 180Z.
A survey of the major trends and directors in Italian cinema since World War II. Directors to be studied include: Rossellini, De Sica, Visconti, Fellini, Antonioni, and Rosi. In English.
ITAL 180XH. Italian Cinema: Honors Section
(1) STAFF
Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Italian 180Z
Enrollment Comments: Formerly offered as ITAL 180ZH.
(Taught in English) A 1 unit seminar accompanying the regular Italian 180Z lecture course on major trends and directors in Italian cinema since World War II. Students will be expected to do extra readings, in class presentations, and watch additional films to those assigned in 180Z.
ITAL 189X. Italy in the Mediterranean: History, Arts, and Culture
(4) FOGU
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Enrollment Comments: Quarters usually offered: Winter, Summer. Course is open only to students who do not intend to enroll in the EAP Summer Program "Mediterranean Crossroads." ITAL 189A is the former number for ITAL 189X.
Repeat Comments: ITAL 189X is a legal repeat of ITAL 189A.
(Taught in English) The history, culture, and arts of Italy, and in particular of the greater Gulf of Naples area, seen from and exclusively Mediterranean perspective from antiquity to the present.
ITAL 195H. Senior Honors Independent Studies in Italian
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Senior standing; completion of 24 upper-division units in Italian.
Enrollment Comments: Students must have a cumulative 3.5 for the proceeding 3 quarter(s). Designed for majors. Students must have a minimum 3.5 GPA for the preceding 3 quarters.
Individual investigations in literary and related fields to Italian Studies in fulfillment of senior honors thesis. Limited to honors students only.
ITAL 199. Independent Studies in Italian
(1-5) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; completion of 2 upper-division courses in Italian.
Enrollment Comments: Students must have a minimum 3.0 GPA for the preceding 3 quarters and limited to 5 units per quarter and 30 units total in 98/99/198/199/199AA-ZZ courses combined. 16 units max w/ only 8 towards major
Individual investigations in literary fields.
ITAL 199RA. Independent Research Assistance
(1-5) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; completion of 2 upper-division courses in Italian;consent of instructor.
Enrollment Comments: Students must have a minimum 3.0 GPA for the preceding 3 quarters and are limited to 5 units per quarter and 30 units total in all 98/99/198/199/199AA-ZZ courses combined.
Independent research, under the supervision of a consenting faculty member.
Collapse Courses Graduate 
ITAL 500. Teaching Assistant Practicum
(4) STAFF
Enrollment Comments: Quarters usually offered: Fall. Units earned in this course, which is required of all teaching assistants, do not apply toward degree.
Supervised teaching of lower-division Italian courses. Includes orientation workshop, weekly meetings with supervisor, preparation and correction of examinations, preparations of discussion sections, class observations.
ITAL 596. Directed Reading and Research
(1-6) STAFF
Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit.
Individual tutorial.