UC Santa Barbara General CatalogUniversity of California, Santa Barbara

Geography

Division of Mathematical, Life, and Physical Sciences
1832 Ellison Hall
Telephone: (805) 893-3663

Undergraduate matters: (805) 893-4929 Email: ugrad_adv@geog.ucsb.edu
Graduate matters: (805) 893-4944 E-mail: grad_assistant@geog.ucsb.edu

Website: www.geog.ucsb.edu
Department Chair: Stuart Sweeney


 

Some courses displayed may not be offered every year. For actual course offerings by quarter, please consult the Quarterly Class Search or GOLD (for current students). To see the historical record of when a particular course has been taught in the past, please visit the Course Enrollment Histories.

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Collapse Courses Lower Division 
GEOG 2. World Regions
(4) STAFF
Enrollment Comments: Open to non-majors.
An examination of the interdependency, connectivity and diversity that characterizes world regions. The course explores the interactions of processes of global change with the environmental and social identities of individual landscapes, cities and peoples.
GEOG 3A. Oceans and Atmosphere
(4) DICKEY, SIEGEL
Enrollment Comments: Quarters usually offered: Winter, Fall.
Introduction to the oceans and atmosphere and their role in the Earth's climate and its weather patterns. Focus on the flows of solar energy throughthe ocean and atmosphere systems. Human impacts of the Earth's climate are also introduced.
GEOG 3B. Land, Water and Life
(4) CHADWICK, ROBERTS
Enrollment Comments: Quarters usually offered: Winter, Spring.
Study of the interactions among water, landforms, soil, and vegetation thatcreate and modify the surface of the Earth. Impacts of physical environmenton human societies and humans as agents of environmental change.
GEOG 5. People, Place, and Environment
(4) STAFF
Enrollment Comments: Quarters usually offered: Winter, Spring, Summer, Fall.
Survey of spatial differentiation and organization of human activity and interaction with the Earth's biophysical systems. Sample topics include human spatial decision-making behavior, migration, population growth, economic development, industrial location, urbanization, and human impacts on the natural environment.
GEOG 7. Energy, Water, and Climate
(4) STAFF
Oil and water are two key strategic resources dominating the international scene. This class provides an overview of global distributions of oil and water resources and analyzes some of the social, economic, and geopolitical ramifications of these distributions.
GEOG 8. Living with Global Warming
(4) STAFF
Overview of global warming and climate change processes. Description of complex relationships between scientific, technological, economic, social, political, and historical facets of global warming and climate change. Introduction to the concept and practice of climate modeling.
GEOG 12. Maps and Spatial Reasoning
(4) CLARKE, JANOWICZ, STAFF
Surveys properties of maps, emphasizing map use and interpretation. Lecture topics include map abstraction, generalization, map projections, and symbolization. Special purpose maps, thematic maps, and the display of quantitative and qualitative information is considered.
GEOG 20. Geography of Surfing
(4) SWEENEY
Social and physical science concepts manifested in the sport of surfing. Topics include wave generation and forecasting, economics of the surf industry, spatial search, strategic behavior under crowding, territorialism, and the generation/diffusion of regional surf cultures.
Collapse Courses Upper Division 
GEOG 101. Transportation Futures
(4) CHURCH
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Recommended Preparation: Geography 5.
Introduction to transportation problems involving energy, the environment, congestion, infrastructure, and future trends. Historical perspective on transportation innovations and their impacts on urban form. Reviews current problems, including the movement of freight and the development of transit-oriented neighborhoods.
GEOG 102. Introduction to Environmental Optics in Physical Geography
(5) ROBERTS
Prerequisite: Geography 3A-B, and 115A.
Recommended Preparation: high school trigonometry.
Basic physical principles of electromagnetic radiation in the environment and their application to physical geography and remote sensing. Radiative transfer in the atmosphere, oceans, snow and ice, inland waters, rock, soil, and vegetation. Spectral signatures in remote sensing.
GEOG 104. Physical Geography of the World's Oceans
(4) WASHBURN
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing or consent of instructor.
Recommended Preparation: Geog 3A
Introduction to the processes which control the circulation of the world's oceans. Topics include: wind driven circulation, thermohaline circulation, water masses, waves, and tides.
GEOG 108. Urban Geography
(4) SWEENEY
Prerequisite: Geography 5.
Introduction to the study of the economic geography of cities and regions and its relation to planning: urbanization, internal structure of cities, settlement systems, regional growth and development, migration, transportation, housing.
GEOG 109. Economic Geography
(4) SWEENEY
Prerequisite: upper-division standing only
Recommended Preparation: Geography 5.
Introduction to the study of spatial economic theories with applications atthe urban, regional, and global scales. Topics include settlement systemdynamics and regional development, land economics and land use policies, and regional inequality and poverty.
GEOG 110. Introduction to Meteorology
(4) CARVALHO
Prerequisite: Geography 3A.
An introduction to the dynamics of the earth's atmosphere. Topics include: energy exchange mechanisms, energy balance, condensation and precipitation processes, the dynamics of pressure and wind systems, and the distributionsof weather disturbances.
GEOG 111A. Transportation Planning and Modeling
(4) GOULIAS
Prerequisite: Geography 5.
Recommended Preparation: Geography 117 or equivalent, introductory probability and statistics.
Issues, problems, technologies, policies, plans, programs, and the transportation-environment relationship. Transportation systems simulation, trip-based and activity data collection and modeling. Applications in planning, design and operations. Lab: Critically examine transportation plans and programs; explore and analyze travel surveys.
GEOG 111B. Transportation Modeling and Simulation
(4) GOULIAS
Prerequisite: Geography 111A.
Recommended Preparation: A prior course in probability & statistics and regression methods. Economics 140A-B.
Enrollment Comments: Quarters usually offered: Winter, Spring.
Multilevel data in time use, activity, and travel surveys. Revealed and stated choice data collection in laboratory/field studies. Regression models. Systems simulation. Applications in policy analysis and traffic operations.Lab: Data analysis to develop models for typical regional simulations.
GEOG 112. Environmental Hydrology
(4) LOAICIGA
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Recommended Preparation: Geography 3B.
Enrollment Comments: One one-day weekend field trip required.
Analysis of the water cycle with emphasis on land-atmosphere interactions, precipitation-runoff, flood, snow melt, and infiltration processes.
GEOG 113. The Alaskan and Arctic Environments Under Siege
(4) DICKEY
Prerequisite: Geography 3a or Earth Science 4.
The purpose of this class is to learn about the geography of Alaska and the Arctic, including its history, climatology, oceanography, ecology, economics, and cultures. A variety of Alaskan and Arctic issues will be addressed, including indigenous people, climate change effects, natural resources, pollution, and political and military significance.
GEOG 114A. Soil Science
(5) CHADWICK
Prerequisite: Chemistry 1A-B; and Geography 3B or Geology 2.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Environmental Studies 114A.
Introduction to the chemical, hydrological, and biological characteristics of soils, their global distribution, and response to management. Field and laboratory projects provide an understanding of soil-landscape distribution, soil morphology, and the physical and chemical properties that influence management decisions.
GEOG 114B. Soil Genesis and Classification
(5) CHADWICK
Prerequisite: Geography 114A.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Environmental Studies 114B.
Introduction to chemical, physical, and biological processes that produce soil and influence their management. Soil morphology, genesis, classification, and global distribution emphasized. Labs cover field site selection, soil description, sampling, laboratory preparation of samples and selected chemical and physical analyses.
GEOG 115A. Remote Sensing of the Environment 1
(5) MCFADDEN
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Recommended Preparation: Geography 3A; and Geography 12 or W 12
Introduction to theory and methods of aerial photography and satellite remote sensing for studying Earth’s environment, from natural vegetation tourban areas. Lab develops fundamental skills in the acquisition, interpretation, and analysis of digital remote sensing imagery.
GEOG 115B. Remote Sensing of the Environment 2
(5) CHU
Prerequisite: Geography 115A with a minimum grade of C.
Properties of satellite imagery and tools required to process data from remote sensing systems. Topics include spectral and spatial enhancement, image classification, geometric and radiometric correction, with emphasis on applications. Lab includes analysis of optical, thermal, Lidar, and radar data.
GEOG 115C. Remote Sensing of the Environment 3
(5) CHU
Prerequisite: Geography 115B with a minimum grade of C.
Advanced image processing, including data fusion and resampling techniques, atmospheric corrections, global navigation satellite systems, and hyperspatial sensors with emphasis on applications. Lab is centered around projects (e.g., glacial and vegetation changes in mountain environments) with poster presentation of results.
GEOG 116. Groundwater Hydrology
(5) LOAICIGA
Prerequisite: GEOG 3B or EARTH 2; or consent of instructor.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Geology 173.
Analysis of groundwater flow in complex geologic environments, aquifer properties, wells and groundwater contamination, surface water-groundwater interactions. Laboratory: basic groundwater experiments, Darcy's law, flow nets, solute dispersion, field measurements of bedrock groundwater, analysis ofpumping-test data.
GEOG 117. Scientific Research Methods in Geography
(4) MONTELLO
Prerequisite: Geography 5; and, Geography 3A or 3B.
Recommended Preparation: Introductory statistics.
Introduction to scientific research methods in human, physical, and techniques geography. Topics include: scientific logic and philosophy, physical measurement, surveys, experimental and nonexperimental research designs, computational modeling, sampling, data analysis and display, written and oral communication, and research ethics.
GEOG 119. Climatic Change and Its Consequences
(4) JONES
Prerequisite: Geography 3A or Geography 8 or Earth Science 2 or Earth Science 3 or Earth Science 4 or consent of instructor.
Mechanisms and processes which produce climate change. Methods for reconstructing paleo-climates. Impacts of past climate change on human societies.
GEOG 126. Maps in Science and Society
(4) CLARKE
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Recommended Preparation: Geog 12
The growth of geodesy, printing, and technology; exploration of the earth and near planets; topographic surveys and photogrammetry; LANDSAT; relation of contemporary thematic cartography to statistics and graphic science.
GEOG 128. Analytical and Computer Cartography
(4) CLARKE
Prerequisite: Geography 12.
Using computers to create and analyze maps. Coding, storing and representing geographical data. Accessing spatial data over the internet. Map data structures and transformations. Design and programming issues in map production.
GEOG 130. The Urban Environment
(4) MCFADDEN
Prerequisite: Geography 3B or Environmental Studies 2 or permission of the instructor.
Environment and climate of cities, suburbs, and other settlements, focusing on the built environment, soils, water, solar radiation, atmosphere, vegetation, and human thermal comfort. Students produce field reports on arange of sites along an urban to exurban gradient.
GEOG 131. Mountain Weather and Climate
(4) CARVALHO
Prerequisite: Geography 3A or 3B; or consent of instructor.
Recommended Preparation: Not open for credit to students who have completed Geography 195LC.
Overview of orographic weather patterns with focus on orographic precipitation and circulation, mountain waves, cloudiness, snowfall and avalanches, fire weather, air pollution and dispersion. Human impacts on mountain environments and climate change in mountain areas are introduced.
GEOG 132. Coastal Pollution
(4) NIDZIEKO
Prerequisite: GEOG 3A
A survey of the source and fate of pollutants in the coastal ocean, focusing specifically on the physical processes that govern the transport of nutrients, sediment, hydrocarbons, and human pathogens in coastal ecosystems. Material includes readings from scientific papers, grey literature, and news media in order to develop intuition for how transport phenomena frame both pollution issues and solutions.
GEOG 133. Tropical Meteorology
(4) CARVALHO, JONES
Prerequisite: Geography 110 with a grade of C or better.
Description of tropical atmosphere. High and low frequency variability: hurricanes, monsoon, El Nino, satellite observations, and modeling.
GEOG 134. Earth System Science
(4) KING, ROBERTS
Prerequisite: Geography 3A or 3B or equivalent course.
Recommended Preparation: Two prior upper-division courses in physical geography.
Description of various components of earth system: climate and hydrologicsystems, biogeochemical dynamics, ecological dynamics, human interactions, and global change. Observations and modeling of earth system.
GEOG 135. Mock Environmental Summit
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing or consent of instructor.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 12 units but only 4 units may beapplied to the major.
A mock summit in which students act as representatives of different countries participating in environmental treaty negotiations. Students work in teams of four or five to prepare a presentation and discussion of environmental issues of concern (energy, greenhouse gasses, etc.).
GEOG 135S. Intense Mock Environmental Summit
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing or consent of instructor.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 12 units but only 4 units may beapplied to the major. Summer course only. This intensive course is taughtfor 3 weeks during summer quarter.
Mock summit in which students act as representatives of different countriesparticipating in environmental treaty negotiations. This three-week course immerses students in the topic of global change and its associated policies, mimicking pressures and intensity at real environmental summits.
GEOG 137. Quantitative Geomorphology
(5) STAFF
Prerequisite: Geography 3B; or, Earth Science 2
Recommended Preparation: Basic knowledge of MATLAB
Enrollment Comments: Concurrently offered with Geog 237.
Basic quantitative understanding of processes shaping Earth's surface. In-depth evaluation of hill slope diffusion, mass wasting, and fluvial processes. Applications of quantitative methods are emphasized throughout class. Laboratory provides understanding of isotopic, physical, and remote sensing data.
GEOG 138. Remote Sensing of the Atmosphere: An Introduction
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Geography 102.
Atmospheric physics and dynamics from a remote sensing perspective. Clouds,precipitation, temperature, and humidity profiles. Weather patterns and systems.
GEOG 140. Environmental Impacts in Human History
(4) ROBERTS
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; or consent of instructor.
Recommended Preparation: Geography 3A or 3B; and Geography 5.
Interactions between human history and the environment are explored. Example topics include early Earth history, long term climate change, the origin of agriculture, short term climate change, the origin of importance of disease and invasive species.
GEOG 141A. Population Geography
(4) LOPEZ-CARR
Prerequisite: Geography 5 or equivalent course.
Various geographic dimensions of human population dynamics: fertility, mortality, and migration. The concepts and language of demography are introduced. The causes and consequences of population dynamics are investigated, including links among population, environment, and development.
GEOG 141B. Population and Development
(4) SWEENEY
Prerequisite: Geography 141A.
A survey of global and regional patterns of demographic change and their connection to significant economic development issues. Basic methods of demographic analysis are introduced to study historical and current issues in population and development.
GEOG 141C. California Population Analysis and Policy
(4) SWEENEY
Prerequisite: upper-division standing only
Recommended Preparation: Geography 141A.
Introduces methods of demographic analysis used in local/regional policy analysis and planning. Course modules focus on population policy issues in California; such as, immigration, K-12 enrollment planning, affordable housing/land preservation, and planning for an elderly population.
GEOG 142. Global Biogeochemical Cycles
(4) KING
Prerequisite: Geography 3A or 3B; or, Environmental Studies 2; or, Earth Science 1; or, Chemistry 1A.
Recommended Preparation: Introductory natural or physical science course in Earth system science.
Enrollment Comments: Open to non-majors. Quarters usually offered: Spring.
examines processes driving element and energy cycling through the Earth system. Aim is to understand global patterns of element fluxes, dynamic nature of element/energy cycles, and prediction of biogeochemical cycling with changes in climate and human impacts.
GEOG 144. Form, Process, and Human Use of Rivers
(4) KELLER, LOAICIGA
Prerequisite: Mathematics 3A-B or 34A-B.
Recommended Preparation: Physics 1 or 6A-AL or Geology 117, Geography 3B.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Environmental Studies 144.
Basic understanding of fluvial (river) hydrology. In-depth evaluation of channel form and fluvial processes and impact of human use on rivers.
GEOG 145. Society and Hazards
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing or consent of instructor.
Enrollment Comments: Open to non-majors.
Presents geographic approaches to the study of environmental hazards, exploring the evolution of theory and key concepts, causal processes, trendsand patterns in the spatial distribution of vulnerability and hazard impacts, and the challenge of management and adaptation.
GEOG 146. Introduction to Transportation
(4) CHURCH
Prerequisite: Geography 5.
Introduction to the analysis of inter- and intra-city passenger and freightmovements. Geographic and economic concepts are used to develop predictive and optimal design/maintenance models for the transportation system. Applications of the models are stressed.
GEOG 148. California
(4) JONES
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing or consent of instructor.
The unique landscapes of California and the physical, cultural, and biotic processes which have produced them.
GEOG 149. The California Channel Islands
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: MCDB 1A-1AL and EEMB 2; or MCDB 20 or EEMB 20 or Geography 3A or 3B or Earth Science 2 or Environmental Studies 2.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Environmental Studies 111.
Discussion of biological, geological, ecological, anthropological, and oceanographic characteristics of the Channel Islands area as well as the management and human uses of this region. Emphasis on islands and ocean waters off Southern California.
GEOG 150. Geography of the United States
(4) MONTELLO
Prerequisite: Not open to freshman.
Intensive study of the physical and cultural processes that have shaped and are shaping the landscapes of the United States.
GEOG 152. Health Geography
(4) CASSELS, STAFF
Prerequisite: Geography 5
Geographic approaches to health, disease, and well-being, with an emphasis on health disparities and inequalities. Topics include social determinants of health, migration, the natural and built environment, vaccines, development, and globalization and health.
GEOG 153A. Behavioral Geography
(4) MONTELLO
Prerequisite: Geography 5
Examines aspects of the human-environment interface, emphasizing behavioralprocesses in spatial contexts including spatial choice and decision making,consumer behavior, migration and other episodic movements, time budgets, spatial cognition, cognitive mapping.
GEOG 153B. Introduction to Spatial Decision Making and Behavior
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Geography 5.
Gateway for the spatial decision making and behavior field. Includes environmental cognition; consumer spatial behavior; migration; space-time budgeting; destination and mode choice; risk and hazard perception; spatial preference. Laboratory sessions involve locational and city management simulationgames.
GEOG 153C. Environmental Perception and Cognition
(4) MONTELLO
Prerequisite: Geography 5.
Research and theory on human perception and cognition of environments. Topics include spatial perception, spatial learning, knowledge structures, navigation and wayfinding, language and spatial cognition, map use, the spatialskills of special populations, and other issues.
GEOG 153D. Spatial Decisions in Retailing
(4) CHURCH, MURRAY
Prerequisite: Geography 5 or consent of instructor.
Applications of spatial decision-making and behavior to retail systems: site selection, site evaluation, trade area estimation, spatial dimensions of retailing, and bricks vs. clicks retailing.
GEOG 155. Geography of Latin America
(4) CARR
Prerequisite: Geography 5 or Global Studies 1 or 2 or Environmental Studies 1 or 2 or 3.
El Pueblo, a vila, li tenamit: however you call where you live, geography matters. How and why are human and physical patterns inscribed where they are on the Latin American landscape?
GEOG 158. Introduction to Marine Resources
(4) SIEGEL
Prerequisite: Geography 3A-B.
Recommended Preparation: Geography 104.
Introduction to the marine resources of the California coast. The interplayof oceanographic, climatic, biogeochemical and geologic factors and the influences of humankind will be addressed. Topics include: climate, circulation, biogeography, fisheries, marine mammals, petroleum, pollution and exploration history.
GEOG 159. Geography of Europe
(4) COUCLELIS
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing or consent of instructor.
A systematic approach to the study of the human and physical resources of Europe. Special emphasis placed on the spatial aspects of urban, economic, and social processes.
GEOG 161. World Agriculture, Food, and Population
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Environmental Studies 149.
Evolution, current status, and alternative futures of agriculture, food and population worldwide. Achieving environmentally, socially, and economically sustainable food systems; soil, water, crops, energy and labor; diversity, stability and ecosystems management; farmer and scientist knowledge and collaboration; common property management.
GEOG 162. Environmental Water Quality
(4) LOAICIGA
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Recommended Preparation: Geography 3B, lower-division biology and chemistry.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Environmental Studies 162.
Study of physio-chemical and biological characteristics of natural waters, analysis of water pollution and treatment, water-quality regulations. Laboratory: independent and supervised research on water pollutants and treatment, quantitative analysis of water-quality data and one-day field work.
GEOG 163. Ocean Circulation
(4) SIEGEL, WASHBURN
Prerequisite: Geography 3A or Earth Science 4.
Enrollment Comments: Not open for credit to students who have taken Geography 163A.
Examination of the general circulation of the oceans and its impact on global climate and climate change. Topics include properties of seawater, forces driving ocean currents, wind and buoyancy generation of basin scalecirculations, and their impact on global climate.
GEOG 165. Waves and Tides in the Ocean
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing or consent of instructor.
Recommended Preparation: Geography 104.
Enrollment Comments: Spring; offered in even-numbered years.
Examination of waves and tides in the ocean. Topics include surface waves, wave generation, internal waves, tides, and tide raising forces. Measurement techniques are also discussed.
GEOG 167. Biogeography: The Study of Plant and Animal Distributions
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Geography 3A or 3B or Environmental Studies 2 or EEMB 2 or Earth Science 2.
Recommended Preparation: a prior course in EEMB.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Environmental Studies 167.
Basic processes governing geographic distribution patterns of biota, including migration, evolution, isolation, and endemism. Biogeographic regions and their histories and an introduction to island biogeography. Emphasis on plants and plant geography. One all-day field trip.
GEOG 168. Field Studies in Biogeography
(4) STILL
Prerequisite: Geography 167 or consent of instructor.
Recommended Preparation: Geog 114A or Env S 100 or EEMB 141.
Intensive field and laboratory course on ecological and biogeographical phenomena, including plant and soil processes, and microclimates. Course utilizes UC Natural Reserve sites. Field measurements are taught, including vegetation and soil sampling, dendrochronology, ecophysiology, and basic micrometeorology.
GEOG 169. Cultural and Biological Diversity of Food Plants
(4) CLEVELAND
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Recommended Preparation: Geography 161 or Environmental Studies 149
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Environmental Studies 158.
The evolution of food plants from domestication to genetic engineering. Patterns of diversity around the world in small-scale, traditionally-based andindustrial communities. Class participation in project on local olive diversity includes field work.
GEOG 171BT. Biotechnology, Food, and Agriculture
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Recommended Preparation: Geography 161 or Environmental Studies 149.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Environmental Studies 166BT. Course offered every other year.
Social, cultural, ethical, biological, and environmental issues surroundingbiotechnology (BT) and food systems. Includes theory and method of BT; scientific, social, and political control of BT; effect of BT on genetic diversity, small-scale farmers, environment, food supply, consumer health.
GEOG 171FP. Small-Scale Food Production
(5) STAFF
Prerequisite: Geography 161 or Environmental Studies 149. Consent of instructor required.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Environmental Studies 166FP.
Biological, ecological, social, and economic principles of small-scale foodproduction and their practical applications. Includes each student cultivating a garden plot; lab exercises, field trips to local farms and gardens.
GEOG 172. Intermediate Geographical Data Analysis
(5) KYRIAKIDIS, SWEENEY
Prerequisite: Statistics and Applied Probability 5AA-ZZ or Ecology, Evolution & Marine Biology 30 or Psychology 5 or Communication 87.
Statistical analysis of geographical data. Topics include spatial auto-correlation, multiple regression in spatial context, and introductory methods for analyzing point, area (lattice), and continuous spatial data. Lab includes the use of statistical software for analyzing various spatial data types.
GEOG 175. Measuring our Environment
(5) ROBERTS
Prerequisite: Geography 3A and 3B.
Recommended Preparation: Geography 102 and 110.
Enrollment Comments: Quarters usually offered: Fall.
Introduction to measurement and interpretation of physical-environmental data (temperature, humidity, precipitation) and integrated environmental measures (e.g. potential evapotranspiration). Working with micrometeorological towers deployed across an environmental gradient, students develop and test hypothesis using real-time tower data.
GEOG 176A. Introduction to Geographic Information Systems and Science
(4) CLARKE, JANOWICZ, KUHN
Prerequisite: Geog 12 or Geog W 12
Comprehensive overview of Geographic Information Systems and Science. Topics span the nature of geographic information and the procedures for operating GIS. Labs provide hands-on experience with GIS and related software.
GEOG 176B. Technical Issues in Geographic Information Systems
(5) CLARKE, JANOWICZ, MURRAY
Prerequisite: A minimum grade of C in Geography 176A.
Study of the technical issues underlying geographic information systems, including coordinate systems and analytic geometry, database models and structures, algorithms and analytical procedures. Laboratory analysis of digital geographic information from physical and social sources.
GEOG 176C. GIS Design and Applications
(5) CLARKE, JANOWICZ
Prerequisite: Geography 176B with a minimum grade of C.
Applying GIS theory and techniques to solve problems in land and resourcemanagement, utilities, and municipal government. Covers all stages of a GIS project: planning, design, analysis, and presentation. Students collaborate to design, develop, and present a GIS pilot study.
GEOG 178. Conceptual Modeling and Programming for the Geo-Sciences
(5) JANOWICZ
Recommended Preparation: Geography 176A or Earth Science 176
A project-based course introducing major conceptual modeling paradigms and object oriented programming from a Geoinformatics perspective. The class isintended for undergraduate students from Geography and the broader Geo-Sciences who have limited (or no previous) experience in software engineering.
GEOG 181A. GIScience Research
(4) CLARKE
Prerequisite: Geography 176A.
Enrollment Comments: Concurrently offered with Geog 281A. Quarters usually offered: Winter.
Introduction to GIScience as an academic research field, conducted through review, discussion, and presentation of seminal works from leading journals. Labs reinforce and develop students' existing techniques on problems of research- level difficulty in spatial analysis, cognition, and mobile GIS.
GEOG 181B. GIScience Studies
(4) CLARKE
Prerequisite: Geog 181A.
Enrollment Comments: Concurrently offered with 281B. Quarters usually offered: Spring.
Builds on previous course through in-depth examination of topics chosen by interests of leading professor. Labs emphasize development of advancedspatial analytical skills, cutting edge visualization techniques and spatio-temporal modeling. Course concludes with an individual GIScience project.
GEOG 182. Global Cities in the Information Age
(4) MURRAY
Prerequisite: Geography 5.
Study of the economic, social, and political networks that link together cities of global importance. Specializations and roles of global cities in the information age economy. Examination of individual cities at the top tiers of the global urban hierarchy.
GEOG 183. Cartographic Design and Geovisualization
(4) CLARKE
Prerequisite: Geography 12 or 176A
Technical introduction to graphic representation and visualization of geographic information. Lectures cover static and dynamic design aspects, thematic mapping, interface design, animation, and 3D. Labs provide experience designing thematic maps and constructing basic GeoVis tools with current software.
GEOG 184. Introduction to Cartographic Programming
(4) CLARKE
Prerequisite: Computer Science 5 and Geography 12.
Introduces the student to cartographic programming principles. Instruction will emphasize structured decomposition, device independence and reusability in cartographic software. Lab work will provide students with hands-on experience with implementing a reusable cartographic library.
GEOG 185A. Geography Planning and Policy Making
(4) MURRAY
Prerequisite: Geography 5 or Environmental Studies 116.
Relevance of geographic knowledge and skills to aspects of planning and policy making. Includes review of core concepts in decision making, planning theory, systems analysis, information systems, urban and regional modeling, forecasting, impact analysis, implementation of decisions, planning policies.
GEOG 185B. Environmental Issues and Location Decision Making
(4) CHURCH, MURRAY
Prerequisite: Geography 3A or 3B or 5 or Environmental Studies 135A.
Enrollment Comments: Taught spring quarter every year.
Introduction to decision-making techniques with regard to land use allocation and planning. Emphasizes addressing conflicts involving environmental concerns and multiple objectives. Examples include water resources development, corridor location (rights-of-way), preservation of endangered species, and power plant siting.
GEOG 185C. Local and Regional Economic Analysis
(4) SWEENEY
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing
Recommended Preparation: Geography 108 or 109.
Introduces methods of economic analysis used in local/regional policy analysis and planning. Course modules focus on planning and policy issues in California related to inter-regional income inequality, industry structure/competitiveness, and regional occupational labor markets.
GEOG 185D. Urban and Environmental System Analysis
(4) MURRAY
Prerequisite: Geography 3A or 3B or 5 or 108 or 109.
Recommended Preparation: Mathematics 3A or 34A.
Applications of operations research techniques and decision analysis in structuring approaches to urban and environmental problems. Examples are drawn from problems in facility location, regional models, transportation and other networks, utility corridors and similar problems.
GEOG 190. Location Theory and Modeling
(4) CHURCH
Prerequisite: Geography 5 or 108 or 109.
Recommended Preparation: Mathematics 3A or 34A.
Survey of basic types of location problems encountered in the modern world and techniques used by analysts in government and industry to solve them. Relationships to classic location theory and models stressed. Studentswill experiment with actual location models on computer.
GEOG 191. Introduction to Optimization Methods for Geographic Problems
(4) CHURCH, MURRAY
Prerequisite: Mathematics 3A, or 34A. Upper-division standing.
Enrollment Comments: Quarters usually offered: Winter. Offered in even-numbered years
Introduction to "Operations Research" methods that are used in the analysisof geographic problems, including linear programming, network programming, integer programming, and dynamic programming. Example problems involving spatial temporal decision making are emphasized.
GEOG 191L. Laboratory in Optimization Methods for Geographic Problems
(1) CHURCH, MURRAY
Prerequisite: Geography 191 or concurrent enrollment.
Computer laboratory utilizing special optimization programs and computer graphics devices.
GEOG 193. Internship in Geography
(1-4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing in geography; consent of department.
Enrollment Comments: Students must have an overall grade-point average of 3.0.
Practical experience and research on geographical problems under faculty direction as interns with local, state, and federal agencies, with private research and development firms, and with other business organizations. Periodic and final reports required.
GEOG 194. Field Studies in Geography
(1-4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit. May require course fee.
Field-based investigation of geographic characteristics of specific places and regions. Human and/or physical phenomena may be emphasized. Field tripsmay include visiting parks, industrial sites, government facilities, wildlands, or urban areas. Scope, emphasis, and requirements subject to change.
GEOG 195AAZZ. Selected Topics in Geography
(2-4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated once for credit provided subject matter differs.
Geographic curriculum content that lies outside regularly scheduled courses. New classes under development or taught temporarily. Course number-lettercombination reflects instructor. Content varies.
GEOG 195DR. Selected Topics in Geography
GEOG 195LC. Selected Topics in Geography
GEOG 197. Careers in Geography
(2) STAFF
Recommended Preparation: Completion of required lower-division Geography courses.
Enrollment Comments: Designed for majors. Quarters usually offered: Winter.
Provides a foundation for the career planning process and post-college life. Opportunities for Geographers, with their tradition of interdisciplinary and integrative thinking and skills, are numerous and expanding. Through lecture, discussion, interactive workshops, speaker panels and more, students will develop a career portfolio.
GEOG 198. Readings in Geography
(1-2) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; completion of two upper-division courses in geography; consent of instructor.
Enrollment Comments: Students must have a 3.0 grade-point average. Geography 198 may be repeatedfor credit to a maximum of 10 units, but only 5 units may be applied toward the major. Students are limited to five units per quarter and 30 unitstotal in 98/99/198/199/199AA-ZZ courses combined.
Designed to provide in-depth directed inquiry into a topic of interest to the student.
GEOG 199. Independent Studies in Geography
(1-5) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; completion of two upper-division courses in geography; consent of instructor.
Enrollment Comments: Students must have a 3.0 grade-point average. GEOG 199 may be repeated for credit to a maximum of 10 units, but only 5 units may be applied toward themajor. Students are limited to five units per quarter and 30 units total in98/99/198/199/199AA-ZZ courses combined. GEOG 199 is an honors course and is required for those seeking distinction in the major.
Independent geographical research conducted under the guidance of Geographyfaculty. Topic and scope varies, as specified by student and supervisory faculty member prior to registration.
GEOG 199RA. Independent Research Assistance in Geography
(1-5) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; completion of two upper-division courses in geography; consent of instructor.
Enrollment Comments: Students must have a 3.0 grade-point average. Geography 199RA may be repeated credit to a maximum of 10 units, but only 5 units may be applied toward the major. Students are limited to five units per quarter and 30 units total in 98/99/198/199/199AA-ZZ courses combined.
Selected research under the direction of a faculty member.
Collapse Courses Graduate 
GEOG 200A. Introduction to Geographic Research
(2) STAFF
Enrollment Comments: Required of all geography graduate students. Normally taken in fall quarterof entering academic year.
Presentation and discussion by department faculty of research areas in the department. Systematic and technique areas of emphasis will be presented, as well as department facilities and research collaborations with other institutions.
GEOG 200B. Introduction to Geographic Research
(4) LOPEZ-CARR
Prerequisite: Geography 200A or approval of graduate committee.
Enrollment Comments: Required of all geography graduate students. Normally taken in winter quarter of entering academic year.
Fundamental issues of research in geography and related areas: the geographic perspective, scientific reading/writing and problem formulation, research techniques, the scientific enterprise, and science and society.
GEOG 200C. Introduction to Geographic Research
(2) STAFF
Prerequisite: Geography 200A or approval of graduate committee, and Geography 200B. Required of all geography graduate students.
Enrollment Comments: Normally taken in spring quarter of entering academic year.
Directed readings and research leading to a draft thesis proposal (MA students) or a systematic literature review in prospective dissertation area (Ph.D. students); participation in seminars discussing ongoing graduate research.
GEOG 201. Seminar in Geography
(2) STAFF
Enrollment Comments: Required of all geography graduate students every quarter offered.
A series of seminars on diverse problems in human and physical geography, and geographic techniques, by current and visiting faculty and researchers.
GEOG 202A. Remote Sensing and Environmental Optics
(5) ROBERTS
Prerequisite: Geography 115A.
Principles of radiation emission; radiative transfer equation and some solution methods; surface interactions; instrumentation; applications to remotesensing and energy budgets in atmosphere, ocean, and other media.
GEOG 208. Water Resource Systems Analysis
(4) LOAICIGA
Recommended Preparation: Geography 112 and 116; upper-division calculus and statistics. Computer programming or object-oriented programming desired (Matlab, Mathematica, Excel).
Quantitative methods (operations research, applied mathematics and statistics, numerical simulation) are used to analyze and synthesize complex water resources systems. Topics include economic analysis, hydropower, flood control, groundwater management, and reservoirs.
GEOG 210A. Analytical Methods in Geography I
(4) DEVRIES, SIEGEL
Prerequisite: Geography 172-172L, or equivalents.
Introduction to analytical methods for geography research. Topics include:calculus, differential equations and linear algebra. Emphasis is placed on solving geographically relevant problems and their documentation.
GEOG 210B. Analytical Methods in Geography II
(4) MURRAY, GOULIAS
Prerequisite: Geography 210A.
Enrollment Comments: Not open for credit to students who have completed Geography 206.
Statistical principles and practice of analyzing geographical data. Topics include bivariate and multiple regression and other multivariate techniques. Emphasis on exploratory data analysis and graphical techniques.
GEOG 210C. Analytical Methods in Geography III
(4) DING
Prerequisite: Geography 210B.
Overview of key concepts in spatial statistics, including measures of spatial association and models for spatial regression, point processes and random fields. Geostatistical methods for analysis and interpolating continuous and area (lattice) data.
GEOG 211A. Transportation Planning & Modeling
(5) GOULIAS
Prerequisite: Introductory probability and statistics.
Issues, problems, technologies, policies, plans, and the transportation-environment relationship. Transportation systems simulation, data collection,and model building. Applications in planning, design, and operations. Lab:Critically examine transportation plans and programs and explore travel surveys.
GEOG 211B. Transportation Modeling & Simulation
(5) GOULIAS
Prerequisite: Geography 211A.
Recommended Preparation: Geography 210B and Geography 210C or equivalent.
Enrollment Comments: Concurrently offered with GEOG 111B. Lectures are same as Geography 111B, graduate students are expected to estimate original models, write a final paper, and give a research seminar in class.
Transportation data collection, travel survey design. Revealed and stated choice data and their collection in laboratory and field studies. Regressionmodels and systems simulation. Applications in policy planning and operations. Lab: Data analysis, model development, testing in typical regional simulation.
GEOG 211C. Activity and Travel Behavior Analysis
(4) GOULIAS
Prerequisite: Geography 211B.
Recommended Preparation: Geography 210C or equivalent.
Enrollment Comments: A final synthesis paper and oral presentation are required.
Time-use, activity analysis, travel behavior in space, time, and social context. Cross-sectional and longitudinal data collection and analysis with emphasis on using time, travel, technology, information, and telecommunication. Applications using simultaneous equations, multilevel, latent class, andstructural equations models.
GEOG 214A. Advanced Remote Sensing: Passive
(5) ROBERTS
Recommended Preparation: At least one prior course in remote sensing advised.
Passive remote sensing (VIS/NIR, thermal, microwave). Discussion of advanced sensors, techniques, modeling, and applications in each spectral region. Includes computer-based laboratory exercises. A final paper and oral presentation of a research project using remote sensing is required.
GEOG 214B. Advanced Remote Sensing: Active
(5) ROBERTS
Recommended Preparation: At least one prior course in remote sensing advised.
Discusses advanced sensors, techniques, modeling, and applications of active remote sensing including Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR)and Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR). Includes computer-based laboratory exercises. Final paper and oral presentation of research project using remote sensing is required.
GEOG 217. Scientific Research Methods in Geography
(4) MONTELLO
Introduction to scientific research methods in human, physical, and techniques geography. Topics include: scientific logic and philosophy, physical measurement, surveys, experimental and nonexperimental research designs, computational modeling, sampling, data analysis and display, written and oral communication, and research ethics.
GEOG 225. Urban Problems
(4) STAFF
Recommended Preparation: Geography 108 and 153B.
Detailed studies of selected social, economic, and physical problems related to modern cities.
GEOG 229. Environmental Perception and Cognition
(4) COUCLELIS, MONTELLO
Theories and methods related to acquiring, representing, and analyzing knowledge of complex large-scale environments.
GEOG 230. Behavioral Geography
(4) COUCLELIS, MONTELLO
Survey of behavioral approaches in a variety of areas of geography.
GEOG 231. Cognitive Issues in Geographic Information Science
(4) COUCLELIS, JANOWICZ, MONTELLO
Prerequisite: Graduate students only.
Theory and research on cognitive issues in geographic information science. Perception, memory, reasoning, communication, human factors in digital worlds.
GEOG 232. Cartographic Transformations
(4) CLARKE
Prerequisite: Mathematics 3A or 34A.
Classical map projections; cartograms; empirical "rubber sheeting"; bidimensional regression. The geometry of geography: geodesics; geographical circles; the distortion tensor; nonsymmetric distances.
GEOG 237. Quantitative Geomorphology
(5) STAFF
Prerequisite: Geography 3B; or, Earth Science 2; or, equivalent.
Recommended Preparation: Upper-division calculus; computer programming or object-oriented programming desired (MATLAB, Python).
Enrollment Comments: Concurrently offered with Geog 137.
Basic quantitative understanding of processes shaping Earth's surface. In-depth evaluation of hill slope diffusion, mass wasting, and fluvial processes. Applications of quantitative methods are emphasized throughout class. Laboratory provides understanding of isotopic, physical, and remote sensing data.
GEOG 241A. Population Geography
(4) LOPEZ-CARR
Enrollment Comments: Not open for credit to students who have completed Geography 241.
Advanced substantive investigation of the geography of human population. The geographical dimensions of fertility, mortality, and migration are explored. Important recent and classic demographic literature is reviewed.
GEOG 241C. Spatial Demography
(4) SWEENEY
Prerequisite: Geography 210A, 210B, and 210C or equivalent.
An introduction to mathematical and statistical demography. Primary emphasis is on spatially-explicit methods: multiregional life tables, multiregional projection, spatial statistics/econometrics applied to population, and life course analysis of migration. Matlab and SAS are used for applications.
GEOG 243. Vegetation-Atmosphere Interactions
(4) MCFADDEN
Graduate seminar on fundamental processes that determine how terrestrial vegetation affects water, energy, and carbon exchanges at Earth's surface, from plant leaves, to individuals, landscapes, and the globe. Integration of this knowledge with land-surface biophysical models and remote sensing.
GEOG 244. Society and Hazards
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
Enrollment Comments: Open to non-majors. Lecture same as Geog 145. Graduate students attend additional discussion.
Reviews of the contribution of human geography to the study of hazard risk,vulnerability, mitigation and adaptation. Classic and new theoretical and empirical literature is explored, emphasizing the connection between development processes, social equity and hazard vulnerability.
GEOG 246. Earth Systems Science: Hydrologic Modeling
(4) LOAICIGA
Recommended Preparation: Geography 112 and 116; upper-division calculus and statistics; computer or object- oriented programming desired (Matlab, Excel).
Quantitative and computational study of land-atmosphere hydrologic interactions; modeling of surface water and groundwater processes, regional groundwater systems and solute transport.
GEOG 249. Earth System Science: Ocean-Atmosphere Dynamics
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Mathematics 5C, Geography 104, and Geography 110, or equivalent.
Present basic and modified equations of motion for rotating fluids to explain large-scale ocean and atmosphere motions. Topics include: geostrophic approximation; conservation of potential vorticity; Ekman transport and pumping; quasi-geostrophic approximation baroclinic instability; Rossby and Kelvin waves.
GEOG 254. Demography
(4) CASSELS, LOPEZ-CARR, SWEENEY
Core concepts of demography are covered, including theory and methods relating to migration, fertility, and mortality. Thematic topics include internal and international migration, maternal and child health, and aging. Local and regional, historical and contemporary demographic transition dynamics are explored. Lecture with class discussions.
GEOG 255. Geography of Latin America
(4) LOPEZ-CARR
Enrollment Comments: Concurrently offered with GEOG 155. Concurrent with Geography 155.
Graduate seminar supplements Geography 155 with further exploration of primary texts probing historical and spatial patterns of society, politics, anddemographics with emphasis on human-environment interactions. Students discuss assigned reading and present in class, and write a term paper.
GEOG 258. Conceptual Modeling and Programming for the Geo-Sciences
(5) JANOWICZ
Recommended Preparation: Geography 176A or Earth Science 176
A project-based course introducing major conceptual modeling paradigms and object oriented programming from a Geoinformatics perspective. The class is intended for graduate students from Geography and the broader Geo-Sciences who have limited (or no previous)experience in software engineering.
GEOG 261. Ocean Optics
(4) SIEGEL
An examination of the optical properties and radiative transfers in naturalwaters. Applications discussed include modeling of solar radiation penetration, reflection and transmittance at the air-sea interface and ocean color remote sensing.
GEOG 263. Introduction to Physical Oceanography
(4) SIEGEL, WASHBURN
A graduate-level introduction to physical oceanography. Topics discussed include: properties of sea water, derivation and application of the equationsof motion for a rotating planet, and the dynamics of wind- and buoyancy-driven general circulation.
GEOG 264. Seminar in Oceanography
(2) SIEGEL; WASHBURN
Prerequisite: Geography 163 or 263; and, Geography 265; or permission of instructor
Graduate seminar in physical, optical, biogeochemical,and biological oceanography
GEOG 266. Introduction to Atmospheric Sciences
(4) CARVALHO, JONES
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
Fundamentals in atmospheric processes that are important for understanding the role of the atmosphere in earth's climate and biogeochemistry. Graduate-level introduction to radiation, dynamics, clouds, chemistry, and how theyinteract.
GEOG 267. Chemical Oceanography
(4) LEA; DEVRIES
Prerequisite: Chemistry 1C; graduate standing.
An introduction to the chemistry of the oceans. Topics include composition and chemical equilibria of seawater, biogeochemical cycling, sediment chemistry, atmospheric exchange, circulation and rates of mixing based on chemical tracers, and the impact of ocean chemistry on climate change.
GEOG 268. Seminar in Ocean Biogeochemistry
(4) DEVRIES, SIEGEL
Repeat Comments: May be repeated for credit with changes in content.
Discussion of current or seminal papers or selected topics in the field of marine biogeochemistry. Content may vary depending on student interest.Student presentations required.
GEOG 275. Seminar in Geographical Information Systems
(4) MURRAY
Study of current trends in geographically oriented information processing systems.
GEOG 276. Geographical Time Series Analysis
(3) WASHBURN
Prerequisite: Geography 172.
Enrollment Comments: Not open for credit to students who have completed Geography 276B.
Introduction to time series analysis in geography. Topics include spatial and temporal sampling, fast Fourier transform techniques, linear systems, and digital filtering.
GEOG 277. Spatial Environmental Modeling
(4) ROBERTS
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit provided topics are different.
Seminar covering topics in spatial environmental modeling. Integrates techniques such as remote sensing and GIS into the modeling of spatial processes. Topics include biogeochemical cycles, hydrology, species distribution andhabitat disturbance.
GEOG 278. Practice of Geostatistical Modeling of Spatial Data
(5) STAFF
Prerequisite: Geography 172 or equivalent, and Geography 274.
Enrollment Comments: Not open for credit to students who have completed Geography 276A.
Practice of geostatistics on large environmental data sets using MATLAB. Methods for modeling spatial patterns, integrating spatial data across multiple spatial scales, and simulating complex spatial distributions.
GEOG 280. Seminar on Climate Change
(2-4) CARVALHO, SIEGEL
A series of lectures and seminars on diverse research topics on climate change.
GEOG 281A. GIScience Research
(4) CLARKE
Enrollment Comments: Concurrently offered with Geog 181A.
Introduction to GIScience as an academic research field, conducted through review, discussion, and presentation of seminal works from leading journals. Labs reinforce and develop students' existing techniques on problems of research- level difficulty in spatial analysis, cognition and mobileGIS.
GEOG 281B. GIScience Studies
(4) CLARKE
Enrollment Comments: Concurrently offered with Geog 181B. Quarters usually offered: Spring.
Builds on previous course through in-depth examination of topics chosen by interests of leading professor. Labs emphasize development of advancedspatial analytical skills, cutting edge visualization techniques and spatio-temporal modeling. Course concludes with an individual GIScience project.
GEOG 288AAZZ. Special Topics in Geography
(2-4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Graduate students only.
Geographic curriculum content that lies outside regularly scheduled courses. New classes under development or taught temporarily. Course number-lettercombination reflects instructor. Content varies.
GEOG 288AM. Special Topics in Geography
GEOG 288CJ. Special Topics in Geography
GEOG 288EC. Special Topics in Geography
GEOG 288HC. Special Topics in Geography
GEOG 288JM. Special Topics in Geography
GEOG 288KJ. Special Topics in Geography
GEOG 288LC. Special Topics in Geography
GEOG 288LW. Special Topics in Geography
GEOG 288SC. Special Topics in Geography
GEOG 288WK. Special Topics in Geography
GEOG 291. Optimization Models for Geographic Problems
(4) CHURCH, MURRAY
Prerequisite: Mathematics 3A or 5A or 34A.
Survey of advanced optimization techniques with applications to geographical problems. Methods include advanced topics in linear programming, dynamic programming, integer programming, networks, and queuing.
GEOG 294. Advanced Topics in Location and Transportation Systems
(4) CHURCH, MURRAY
Prerequisite: Geography 190 or 191 or 291.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated with changes in content, methods, and application areas examined.
Study of current research and application of systems models in the analysis, design, operation, and scheduling of transport and location problems.
GEOG 295. Advanced Topics in Pedology
(4) CHADWICK
Prerequisite: Geography 209.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit with changes in content, methods, and applications areas examined.
Intensive reading and discussions of current topics in soil-geomorphology, soil-geochemistry, and quantitative modeling of soil processes.
GEOG 500. Teaching Assistant Training
(2) STAFF
Course for new teaching assistants to examine geographic teaching methodsand classroom procedures. Emphasis on use of equipment and facilities in the department, teaching aids, lectures, exams, grading, student advising, and special problems. Repeatable.
GEOG 596. Directed Reading and Research
(2-8) STAFF
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and graduate advisor.
Enrollment Comments: No more than half the graduate units necessary for the Master's Degree may be taken in Geography 596. Preparation, 2-8 hours.
Individual tutorial. Instructor is usually student's major professor.
GEOG 597. Individual Study for Ph.D. Examinations
(1-12) STAFF
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and graduate advisor.
Enrollment Comments: S/U grade. Maximum of 12 per quarter; enrollment limited to 24 units total.Variable hours.
Instructor should be student's major professor or chair of the doctoral committee.
GEOG 598. Master's Thesis Research and Preparation
(1-12) STAFF
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and graduate advisor.
Enrollment Comments: S/U grading. Preparation, 1-12 hours.
Research toward and writing of thesis.
GEOG 599. Ph.D. Dissertation Research and Preparation
(1-12) STAFF
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and graduate advisor.
Enrollment Comments: S/U grading. Preparation, 1-12 hours.
Research toward and writing of dissertation. Instructor should be chair of student's doctoral committee.

 
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Collapse Courses Lower Division 
GEOG W 8. Living with Global Warming
(4) GAUTIER
Overview of global warming and climate change processes. Description of complex relationships between scientific, technological, economic, social,political, and historical facets of global warming and climate change. Introduction to the concept and practice of climate modeling.
GEOG W 12. Maps and Spatial Reasoning
(4) CLARKE, JANOWICZ, STAFF
Enrollment Comments: Quarters usually offered: Spring, Summer, Fall.
Surveys properties of maps, emphasizing map use and interpretation. Lecture topics include map abstraction, generalization, map projections, and symbolization. Special purpose maps, thematic maps, and the display of quantitative and qualitative information is considered.