UC Santa Barbara General CatalogUniversity of California, Santa Barbara

Philosophy

Department of Philosophy
Division of Humanities and Fine Arts
South Hall 5707-5724 (Faculty Offices)
South Hall 3400 Suite (Student Advising and Administrative Offices)
Telephone: (805) 893-7488
Undergraduate e-mail: ug_advisor@philosophy.ucsb.edu
Graduate e-mail: grad_advisor@philosophy.ucsb.edu
Website: www.philosophy.ucsb.edu
Department Chair: Thomas Holden


 

Some courses displayed may not be offered every year. For actual course offerings by quarter, please consult the Quarterly Class Search or GOLD (for current students). To see the historical record of when a particular course has been taught in the past, please visit the Course Enrollment Histories.

Philosophy
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Collapse Courses Lower DivisionĀ 
PHIL 1. Short Introduction to Philosophy
(4) STAFF
Enrollment Comments: Not open for credit to students who have completed Philosophy 5.
An introductory course in western philosophy.
PHIL 3. Critical Thinking
(4) STAFF
Practical reasoning, argumentation, and the analysis of language as instruments of sound thinking in everyday life.
PHIL 4. Introduction to Ethics
(4) STAFF
An examination, at an introductory level, of such ethical issues as: why bemoral, moral relativism, the nature of virtues and vices; and possibly consideration of practical ethical problems such as abortion or war.
PHIL 7. Biomedical Ethics
(4) STAFF
An examination of philosophical thinking about moral issues raised by the practice of medicine. Traditional ethical theories and problems will serve as background to, and in turn be illuminated by, such issues as informed consent, paternalism, abortion, euthanasia, and genetic engineering.
PHIL 12. Introduction to the Philosophy of Religion
(4) STAFF
An introduction to several traditional philosophical problems connected with religious belief.
PHIL 20A. History of Philosophy
(4) STAFF
From Thales to Aristotle.
PHIL 20B. History of Philosophy
(4) STAFF
From Medievals to Rationalists.
PHIL 20C. History of Philosophy
(4) STAFF
From the Empiricists and Kant.
Collapse Courses Upper DivisionĀ 
PHIL 100A. Ethics
(4) MCMAHON, HANSER, ZIMMERMAN, E
Prerequisite: One prior course in philosophy; or, Philosphy 3 (may be taken concurrently)
An examination of the fundamental concepts, theories, and problems of moral or political philosophy.
PHIL 100B. Theory of Knowledge
(4) RESCORLA, ZIMMERMAN
Prerequisite: One prior course in philosophy.
Recommended Preparation: Philosophy 3 or 183.
Investigates fundamental questions surrounding the nature of human knowledge and human justification, such as: What do I know? What am I justified in believing? What is it to know something? What is it to hold a justified belief?
PHIL 100C. Philosophy of Language
(4) FALVEY, SALMON
Prerequisite: One prior course in philosophy.
Recommended Preparation: Philosophy 3 or 183.
Introduction to philosophical problems and theories concerning the nature of language. Topics typically include the notion of linguistic structure, theories of meaning and reference, names and descriptions, the relations between languages and thought, necessity and analytic truty, and conversationalnorms.
PHIL 100D. Philosophy of Mind
(4) RESCORLA, ZIMMERMAN
Prerequisite: One prior course in philosophy.
Recommended Preparation: Philosophy 3 or 183.
Discussion of some central questions about the mind: are people identical to their bodies? What is it to feel, believe, or desire something? What distinguishes intelligent thinking from a computer's activities? What is the connection between language and thought?
PHIL 100E. Metaphysics
(4) ANDERSON, FALVEY
Prerequisite: One prior course in philosophy.
Recommended Preparation: Philosophy 3 or 183.
Introduction to the philosophical study of the most general and fundamentalfeatures of reality. Topics vary, but may include universals, particulars, identity and individuation, substance, the nature of persons, causation, and the nature of time.
PHIL 100F. Introduction to the Philosophy of Science
(4) RESCORLA
Prerequisite: One prior course in philosophy; or major in physics, chemistry, or biology.
An introduction to the philosophical analysis of the concepts and methods of science, treating such topics as: explanation, confirmation, causation, scientific laws, the interpretation, meaning and reference of scientific theories, theory reduction and theory change, and scientific revolutions.
PHIL 107. Continental Philosophy
(4) MCMAHON
Prerequisite: Philosophy 100B or 100C or 100D or 100E.
A survey of recent continental philosophy.
PHIL 108. Philosophy of the Social Sciences
(4) FALVEY
Prerequisite: One prior course from Philosophy 100B-C-D-E; or, two upper-division philosophy courses.
Questions and problems in the methodology of the social sciences, includingwhether the social sciences have distinctive methods of explanation; modelsof rationality employed in the social sciences; and whether the social sciences can or should be value-neutral.
PHIL 112. Philosophy of Religion
(4) ANDERSON
Prerequisite: One prior course in philosophy.
A study of some of the following topics: religious language, the existence and nature of god, the problem of evil, religious experience, religion and morality, the rationality of religious belief.
PHIL 116. Meaning and Reference
(4) SALMON
Prerequisite: Philosophy 183 (may be taken concurrently).
An examination of the classical theories of meaning and reference: John Stuart Mill, Gottlob Frege, Bertrand Russell, and the theory of direct reference. Investigation of solutions to the classical puzzles of meaning and reference.
PHIL 121. Political Philosophy
(4) ELIZONDO
Prerequisite: Major in philosophy, law & society, political science, or global and international studies.
Analysis of fundamental political conceptions; the state, sovereignty, political obligation, natural rights, natural law, etc.
PHIL 122. Theories of Justice
(4) ELIZONDO
Prerequisite: Major in philosophy, law & society, political science, or global and international studies.
An examination, in detail, of one or more influential philosophical theories of justice.
PHIL 124. Philosophy of Science
(4) WILKINS, ANDERSON
Prerequisite: A prior course in philosophy.
Recommended Preparation: a strong background in science.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit up to 8 units with consent of instructor.
Analysis of the interrelated functions of scientific theories, models, laws, experiments, and observational procedures in relation to the goals ofexplanation, prediction, control, and understanding. Problems of induction and the logic of confirmation.
PHIL 124A. Philosophy of Science
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: A prior course in philosophy.
Recommended Preparation: A strong background in science.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit up to 8 units with consent of instructor.
What is science? How does it differ from non-science? Course examines both the history of science and the history of philosophy of science in an effort to discover just what science is and what it has to offer.
PHIL 124B. Philosophy of Physics
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: A prior course in philosophy.
Recommended Preparation: A strong background in physics.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit up to 8 units with consent of instructor.
Emphasizes the role that philosophical considerations played in both the evolution and actual practice of science. The major emphasis is on the creation and development of the watersheds of twentieth-century physics: relativity and quantum mechanics.
PHIL 124C. Philosophy of Space and Time
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: A prior course in philosophy.
Recommended Preparation: A strong background in physics.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit up to 8 units with consent of instructor.
Is space a thing or a series of relations holding between objects? Does time pass differently for different observers, or in different parts of the universe? Consideration of these and other questions lead to an examination of contemporary physics.
PHIL 124D. Philosophy of Quantum Mechanics
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: A prior course in philosophy.
Recommended Preparation: A strong background in physics.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit up to 8 units with consent of instructor.
Examines the history of the development of quantum mechanics, focusing on the philosophical conundrums that arose from the tortured process of findinga theory that "worked." This is done at the conceptual level, with minimal reliance on mathematical techniques.
PHIL 126. Social Philosophy
(4) MCMAHON, ELIZONDO
Prerequisite: Philosophy 100A; or, two prior courses in philosophy.
This course will examine moral problems associated with economic activity; for example, economic justice and the moral basis of property rights.
PHIL 129. Philosophy of International Relations
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Major in philosophy, law & society, political science, or global and international studies.
Study of philosophical problems in international relations.
PHIL 130. Freedom and Determinism
(4) BRUECKNER, ELIZONDO
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: one prior course in philosophy.
Determinism is the doctrine that the laws of nature plus the past necessitate the future. Is determinism compatible with the view that we often act freely and are often morally responsible for what we do?
PHIL 131. Advanced Topics in Applied Ethics.
(4) HANSER, WILKINS
Prerequisite: Philosophy 100A; or, two prior courses in philosophy.
Advanced Topics in Applied Ethics.
PHIL 133. History of Political Thought
(4) ELIZONDO
Prerequisite: Major in philosophy, law & society, political science, or global and international studies.
A study of one or more important figures from the history of political thought.
PHIL 134. Moral Psychology
(4) ZIMMERMAN, ELIZONDO
Prerequisite: Philosophy 4 or 100A; and, Philosophy 100B or 100C or 100D or 100E.
An examination of the nature of desires, emotions, the imagination and other aspects of human psychology, and of the ways these bear on the moral evaluation of people and actions.
PHIL 135. Contemporary Philosophy
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Philosophy 100B or 100D or 100E.
Systematic investigation of topics drawn from contemporary analytic or continental philosophy.
PHIL 137. Aesthetic Theory
(4) MCMAHON
Prerequisite: One prior course in philosophy.
A study of some major works in the philosophy of art from Plato to the present, with emphasis on the development and analysis of the basic concepts employed in criticism of the arts.
PHIL 138. Normative Ethics
(4) HANSER, ELIZONDO
Prerequisite: Philosophy 100A; or, two prior courses in philosophy.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 8 units.
An examination of what makes actions morally right or wrong and people morally good or bad.
PHIL 139. Meta-Ethics
(4) ANDERSON, ELIZONDO
Prerequisite: Philosophy 100A; or, two prior courses in philosophy.
An examination of problems concerning the meaning and justification of moral judgments.
PHIL 141. History of Ethics
(4) MCMAHON, ELIZONDO
Prerequisite: Philosophy 100A; or, two prior courses in philosophy.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 8 units.
A study of one or more historically important moral philosophers.
PHIL 142. Advanced Topics in Philosophy of Religion
(4) ANDERSON
Prerequisite: Philosophy 112; or two prior upper-division courses in philosophy; and, oneadditional course in philosophy.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 8 units.
Advanced topics in the philosophy of religion. Specific subject matter is selected by the instructor and descriptions are available in the department office before each quarter.
PHIL 143. Philosophy of Law
(4) STAFF
An introduction to some of the main issues generated by the philosophical question, "What is law?" In what sense is conduct made obligatory by the existence of law? What, if any, is the relationship between law and morals? What are rules? What does it mean to say that a rule exists? Do courts reallyapply rules or merely pretend to do so?
PHIL 144. Advanced Topics in the Philosophy of Law
(4) HANSER
Prerequisite: Major in philosophy, law & society, political science, or global and international studies.
Study of advanced topics in the philosophy of law.
PHIL 145. Punishment and Responsibility
(4) STAFF
An examination of some of the philosophical problems of punishment and responsibility: The rationale of punishment and the legal doctrine of Mensrea; the analysis of conditions of responsibility, relations between punishment,responsibility, retribution, guilt, shame, etc.
PHIL 146.
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: One course completed in Philosophy.
Introduction to major problems at the intersection of philosophy and literature. Issues addressed may include philosophical assessments of literature, authorship and interpretation, truth in fiction, significance of literary works and form for philosophy; texts include imaginative literature and philosophical essays.
PHIL 149. Action Theory
(4) HANSER, FALVEY, ELIZONDO
Prerequisite: One prior course from Philosophy 100B, 100C, 100D, and 100E; or, two prior course in philosophy.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 8 units.
An examination of philosophical topics connected with human action, e.g. the role of intentions and desires in the explanation and justification of action and the nature of practical reason.
PHIL 150A. Advanced Topics in Ethical Theory
(4) MCMAHON, HANSER, ELIZONDO
Prerequisite: Two courses from Philosophy 100A or 100B or 100C or 100D or 100E or 100F.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 12 units with consent of instructor.
Advanced topics in ethical theory. Specific subject matter is selected by the instructor and descriptions are available in the department office before each quarter.
PHIL 150B. Advanced Topics in Theory of Knowledge
(4) ZIMMERMAN
Prerequisite: Two courses from Philosophy 100A or 100B or 100C or 100D or 100E or 100F.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 8 units with consent of instructor.
Advanced topics in theory of knowledge. Specific subject matter is selectedby the instructor and descriptions are available in the department office before each quarter.
PHIL 150C. Advanced Topics in Philosophy of Language
(4) FALVEY, SALMON
Prerequisite: Two courses from Philosophy 100A or 100B or 100C or 100D or 100E or 100F.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 8 units with consent of instructor.
Specific subject matter selected by the instructor. Descriptions available in the department office before each quarter.
PHIL 150D. Advanced Topics in Philosophy of Mind
(4) FALVEY
Prerequisite: Two courses from Philosophy 100A or 100B or 100C or 100D or 100E or 100F.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 8 units with consent of instructor.
Advanced topics in philosophy of mind. Specific subject matter is selected the instructor and descriptions are available in the department office before each quarter.
PHIL 150E. Advanced Topics in Metaphysics
(4) SALMON
Prerequisite: Two courses from Philosophy 100A or 100B or 100C or 100D or 100E or 100F.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 8 units with consent of instructor.
Advanced topics in metaphysics. Specific subject matter is selected by the instructor and descriptions are available in the department before each quarter.
PHIL 151. Pre-Socratics
(4) TSOUNA, HANSER
Prerequisite: One prior upper-division course in Philosophy and one additional course in philosophy.
A study of the pre-Socratic philosophers.
PHIL 152. Plato
(4) TSOUNA
Prerequisite: One prior upper-division course in Philosophy and one additional course in philosophy.
The philosophy of Plato.
PHIL 153. Aristotle
(4) TSOUNA, HANSER, ELIZONDO
Prerequisite: One prior upper-division course in Philosophy and one additional course in philosophy.
The philosophy of Aristotle.
PHIL 156. Hellenistic Philosophy
(4) TSOUNA
Prerequisite: One prior upper-division course in Philosophy and one additional course in philosophy.
An examination of the thought of major Greek philosophers of the Hellenistic period.
PHIL 160. Descartes
(4) HOLDEN, FALVEY
Prerequisite: Philosophy 20B or 100B or 100D or 100E.
The philosophy of Descartes.
PHIL 162. Leibniz
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Philosophy 100B or 100D or 100E.
The philosophy of Leibniz.
PHIL 163. Locke
(4) HOLDEN
Prerequisite: Philosophy 20B or 20C or 100B or 100D or 100E.
The philosophy of John Locke.
PHIL 164. Berkeley
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Philosophy 20B or 100B or 100D or 100E.
The philosophy of Berkeley.
PHIL 165. Hume
(4) ZIMMERMAN, HOLDEN
Prerequisite: One prior upper-division course in Philosophy and one additional course in philosophy.
The philosophy of David Hume.
PHIL 166A. Kant
(4) ZIMMERMAN, ELIZONDO
Prerequisite: Two prior courses from Philosophy 20B, 100B, 100D, 100E or 160.
An examination of the philosophy of Kant with special attention to the critique of pure reason.
PHIL 166B. Kant
(4) SCHWYZER, BRUECKNER
Prerequisite: Philosophy 166A.
An examination of the philosophy of Kant with special attention to the critique of pure reason.
PHIL 168. Nietzsche
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Philosophy 100B or 100D or 100E.
The philosophy of Nietzsche.
PHIL 172. Heidegger
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Philosophy 100B or 100D or 100E.
The philosophy of Heidegger.
PHIL 173. Frege
(4) ANDERSON, RESCORLA
Prerequisite: Philosophy 183 and another previous course in philosophy.
An examination of the work of the German philosopher and logician, Gottlob Frege.
PHIL 176. Historical Philosophers
(4) HOLDEN, ZIMMERMAN, ELIZONDO
Prerequisite: Philosophy 100A or 100B or 100D or 100E.
Enrollment Comments: Concurrently offered with Phil 276G. May be repeated with consent of department provided course content is different.
Examination of historical philosophers beyond those covered in Philosophy 106 and 151-166.
PHIL 180. Philosophical Psychology
(4) HANSER
Prerequisite: One prior upper-division course in philosophy.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 8 units.
An examination of some of the concepts of the mind such as those of desire,intention, action, perception, sensation, and the unconcious.
PHIL 183. Beginning Modern Logic
(4) SALMON, ANDERSON
An introduction to the concepts and methods of moder symbolic logic. Emphasis is placed on problems of translating english expressions into logical symbols and on the development of skills in using the formal proof proceduresof sentential and predicate logic.
PHIL 184. Intermediate Modern Logic
(4) SALMON, ANDERSON
Prerequisite: Philosophy 183.
Further application and development of the predicate calculus, including the calculi of identity and description. An introduction to the metalogical questions of completeness, consistency, and decidability.
PHIL 185. Advanced Modern Logic
(4) SALMON, ANDERSON
Prerequisite: Philosophy 184 or Mathematics 109A.
Topics from the theory of formal systems, set theory, recursive function theory, and automata theory.
PHIL 186. Philosophical Logic
(4) SALMON, ANDERSON
Prerequisite: Philosophy 184.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 8 units.
Topics in logical theory and the philosophy of logic: intensional logic andother non-standard logics (such as modal logic); discussion of results of modern logic and their philosophical implications.
PHIL 187. Philosophy of Mathematics
(4) ANDERSON, RESCORLA
Prerequisite: Philosophy 183 or Mathematics 108A or 109A.
Logistic, formalist, and intuitionist views of th nature of mathematics. Epistemological problems of applied mathematics.
PHIL 188. Theory of Value
(4) ELIZONDO
Prerequisite: One prior course in philosophy.
Study of theories of the nature and structure of the good and of value judgments generally.
PHIL 192. Internship in Philosophy
(1-12) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing in philosophy; consent of department and instructor
Enrollment Comments: Students must have a 3.0 overall grade-point average. May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 12 units but only 4 units may count toward major.
Practical experience and application of analytical skills learned in philosophy as interns with agencies and business. Periodic and final reports required under faculty direction.
PHIL 197A. Senior Honors Thesis
(2) STAFF
Prerequisite: Enrollment limited to senior honors philosophy majors; by consent of instructor and departmental approval.
A continuous two-quarter research and writing tutorial designed for senior honors majors. The first term will be spent mainly in selecting and researching a topic for the thesis.
PHIL 197B. Senior Honors Thesis
(2) STAFF
Prerequisite: Enrollment limited to senior honors philosophy majors; by consent of instructor and departmental approval.
A continuous two-quarter research and writing tutorial designed for senior honors majors. The second term will be spent mainly in the writing of the thesis.
PHIL 197P. Senior Project for Majors with Ethics and Public Policy Emphasis
(2-4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing in philosophy; consent of department.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit to 8 units with consent of instructor.
A research and writing tutorial on some topic relevant to issues in ethics and public policy. A written proposal of the project must be approved by the undergraduate adviser and the instructor.
PHIL 199. Independent Studies in Philosophy
(1-5) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; completion of 2 upper-division courses in philosophy.
Enrollment Comments: Students must have a minimum 3.0 GPA for the preceding 3 quarters. Philosophy 199 may be repeated to a maximum of 12 units. No more than 12 units may be applied to the major. Students are limited to 5 units per quarter and 30 units total in all 98/99/198/199/199AA-ZZ courses combined.
A written statement of the proposed program of study must be presented tothe instructor for his or her approval before the student signs up for the course.
PHIL 199RA. Independent Research Assistant
(1-5) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Enrollment Comments: Students must enroll under instructor number and have a minimum 3.0 GPA forthe preceding 3 quarters. Students are limited to 5 units per quarter and 30 units total in all 98/99/198/199/199AA-ZZ course combined. Philosophy 199RA may be repeated for credit to a maximum of 5 units.
Course work shall consist of faculty supervised research.
Collapse Courses GraduateĀ 
PHIL 208G. Philosophy of the Social Sciences
(4) FALVEY
Questions and problems in the methodology of the social sciences, includingwhether the social sciences have distinctive methods of explanation; modelsof rationality employed in the social sciences and whether the social sciences can or should be value-neutral.
PHIL 212G. Philosophy of Religion
(4) ANDERSON
Study at the graduate level of topics in the philosophy of religion.
PHIL 216G. Meaning and Reference
(4) SALMON
An examination of the classical theories of meaning and reference: John Stuart Mill, Gottlob Frege, Bertrand Russell, and the theory of direct reference. Solutions to the classical puzzles of meaning and reference are investigated.
PHIL 221G. Political Philosophy
(4) ELIZONDO
A study at the graduate level of selected problems in political philosophy.
PHIL 222G. Theories of Justice
(4) ELIZONDO
A study at the graduate level of an examination, in detail, of one or more influential philosophical theories of justice.
PHIL 224A. Philosophy of Science
(1-4) STAFF
What is science? How does it differ from non-science? Course examines both the history of science and the history of philosophy of science in an effort to discover just what science is and what it has to offer.
PHIL 224B. Philosophy of Physics
(1-4) STAFF
Emphasizes the role that philosophical considerations played in both the evolution and actual practice of science. The major emphasis is on the creation and development of the watersheds of twentieth-century physics: relativity and quantum mechanics.
PHIL 224C. Philosophy of Space and Time
(1-4) STAFF
Is space a thing or a series of relations holding between objects? Does time pass differently for different observers, or in different parts of the universe? Consideration of these, and other questions leads to an examinationof contemporary physics.
PHIL 224D. Philosophy of Quantum Mechanics
(1-4) STAFF
Examines the history of the development of quantum mechanics, focusing on the philosophical conundrums that arose from the tortured process of findinga theory that "worked." This is done at the conceptual level, with minimal reliance on mathematical techniques.
PHIL 226G. Social Philosophy
(4) MCMAHON, ELIZONDO
A study at the graduate level of moral problems associated with economic activity, for example, economic justice and the moral basis of property rights.
PHIL 230G. Freedom and Determinism
(4) ELIZONDO
A study at the graduate level of the problem of whether human action is free or determined.
PHIL 231G. Advanced Topics in Applied Ethics
(4) HANSER
Advanced topics in applied ethics.
PHIL 233G. History of Political Thought
(4) ELIZONDO
A study of one or more important figues from the history of political thought.
PHIL 234G. Moral Psychology
(4) FALVEY, ZIMMERMAN, ELIZONDO
An examination of the nature of desires, emotions, the imagination, and other aspects of human psychology, and of the ways these bear on the moral evaluation of people and actions.
PHIL 235G. Contemporary Philosophy
(4) SALMON
A study at the graduate level of selected topics in contemporary philosophy.
PHIL 236G. Aesthetics
(4) MCMAHON
Topics may include the aesthetic experience, the aesthetic object, the creative act, and art criticism.
PHIL 237G. Aesthetic Theory
(4) MCMAHON
A study at the graduate level of the development and analysis of the basic concepts employed in criticism of the arts.
PHIL 238G. Normative Ethics
(4) MCMAHON, HANSER, ELIZONDO
An examination of what makes actions morally right or wrong and people morally good or bad.
PHIL 239G. Meta-ethics
(4) HANSER, ANDERSON, ELIZONDO
An examination of problems concerning the meaning and justification of moral judgments.
PHIL 241G. History of Ethics
(4) MCMAHON, ELIZONDO
A study of one or more historically important moral philosophers.
PHIL 242G. Topics in the Philosophy of Religion
(4) ANDER
A study at the graduate level of topic in the philosophy of religion.
PHIL 244G. Advanced Topics in the Philosophy of Law
(4) STAFF
Advanced topics in the philosophy of law.
PHIL 249G. Action Theory
(4) HANSER, FALVEY, ELIZONDO
An examination of philosophical topics connected with human action, e.g. the role of intentions and desires in the explanation and justification of action and the nature of practical reasons.
PHIL 250A. Topics in Ethical Theory
(4) MCMAHON, HANSER, ELIZONDO
A study at the graduate level of topics in ethical theory.
PHIL 250B. Topics in Theory of Knowledge
(4) STAFF
A study at the graduate level of topics in th theory of knowledge.
PHIL 250C. Topics in Philosophy of Language
(4) SALMON, FALVEY
A study at the graduate level of topics in the philosophy of language.
PHIL 250D. Topics in Philosophy of Mind
(4) FALVEY
A study at the graduate level of topics in the philosophy of mind.
PHIL 250E. Topics in Metaphysics
(4) SALMON
A study at the graduate level of topics in metaphysics.
PHIL 251G. Pre-Socratics
(4) TSOUNA
A study at the graduate level of selected writings of the pre-Socratic era.
PHIL 252G. Plato
(4) TSOUNA
A study at the graduate level of selected writings of Plato.
PHIL 253G. Aristotle
(4) TSOUNA, ELIZONDO
A study at the graduate level of selected writings of Aristotle.
PHIL 256G. Hellenistic Philosophy
(4) TSOUNA
A study at the graduate level of selected writings of the Hellenistic philosophers.
PHIL 262G. Leibniz
(4) ANDERSON, HOLDEN
A study at the graduate level of selected writings of Leibniz.
PHIL 264G. Berkeley
(4) HOLDEN
A study at the graduate level of selected writings of Berkeley.
PHIL 265G. Hume
(4) ZIMMERMAN, HOLDEN
A study at the graduate level of selected writings of Hume.
PHIL 266A. Kant
(4) ZIMMERMAN, ELIZONDO
A study at the graduate level of selected writings of Kant.
PHIL 268G. Nietzsche
(4) STAFF
A study at the graduate level of selected writings of Nietzsche.
PHIL 272G. Heidegger
(4) STAFF
A study at the graduate level of selected writings of Heidegger.
PHIL 273G. Frege
(4) ANDERSON, RESCORLA
An examination of the work of the german philosopher and logician, Gottlob Frege.
PHIL 276G. Historical Philosophers
(4) HOLDEN, ZIMMERMAN, ELIZONDO
Enrollment Comments: Concurrently offered with Phil 176. May be repeated with consent of department provided course content is different.
Examination of historical philosophers beyond those covered in Philosophy 106 and 151-166.
PHIL 283G. Beginning Symbolic Logic
(4) ANDERSON, SALMON
An introduction to symbolic logic at the graduate level.
PHIL 284G. Intermediate Symbolic Logic
(4) ANDERSON, SALMON
A continuation of the study of symbolic logic.
PHIL 285G. Advanced Symbolic Logic
(4) SALMON
An advanced study of symbolic logic.
PHIL 286G. Philosophical Logic
(4) SALMON
Prerequisite: Philosophy 183 and 184, or equivalent.
Topics in logical theory and the philosophy of logic: intensional logic andother non-standard logics (such as modal logic); discussion of results of modern logic and their philosophical implications.
PHIL 287G. Philosophy of Mathematics
(4) STAFF
A study at the graduate level of selected problem in the philosophy of mathematics.
PHIL 296A. Seminar in Ethics
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
Graduate seminar in ethics. Specific subject matter is selected by the instructor and descriptions are available in the department office before each quarter.
PHIL 296B. Seminar in Epistemology
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
Graduate seminar in epistemology. Specific subject matter is selected by the instructor and descriptions are available in the department office before each quarter.
PHIL 296C. Seminar in the Philosophy of Language
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
Graduate seminar in the philosophy of language. Specific subject matter is selected by the instructor and descriptions are available in the department office before each quarter.
PHIL 296D. Seminar in the Philosophy of Mind
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
Graduate seminar in the philosophy of mind. Specific subject matter is selected by the instructor and descriptions are available in the departmentoffice before each quarter.
PHIL 296E. Seminar in Metaphysics
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
Graduate seminar in metaphysics. Specific subject matter is selected by theinstructor and descriptions are available in the department office before each quarter.
PHIL 297A. Seminar in the History of Philosophy
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
Graduate seminar in the history of philosophy. Specific subject matter isselected by the instructor and descriptions are available in the department office before each quarter.
PHIL 297B. Seminar on Contemporary Figures in Philosophy
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
Graduate seminar on contemporary figures in philosophy. Specific subject matter is selected by the instructor and descriptions are available in the department office before each quarter.
PHIL 298A. Seminar in Aesthetics
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
Graduate seminar in aesthetics. Specific subject matter is selected by the instructor and descriptions are available in the department office before each quarter.
PHIL 298B. Seminar on Problems in Legal and Political Philosophy
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
Graduate seminar on problems in legal and political philosophy. Specific subject matter is selected by the instructor and descriptions are available in the department office before each quarter.
PHIL 299A. Seminar in the Philosophy of Logic
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
Graduate seminar in the philosophy of logic. Specific subject matter is selected by the instructor and descriptions are available in the department office before each quarter.
PHIL 299B. Seminar in the Philosophy of Mathematics
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
Graduate seminar in the philosophy of mathematics. Specific subject matter is selected by the instructor and descriptions are available in the department office before each quarter.
PHIL 299C. Seminar in the Philosophy of Science
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
Graduate seminar in the philosophy of science. Specific subject matter isselected by the instructor and descriptions are available in the department office before each quarter.
PHIL 500. Apprentice Teaching in Philosophy
(2-4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Teaching assistantship in philosophy.
Enrollment Comments: No unit credit allowed toward degree.
A teaching practicum involving the study and development of effective teaching techniques in philosophy. Each student will be responsible for andteacha class section in an undergraduate course in philosophy. One meetingper week with instructor and one or more discussion section meetings, and attendance in the lecture of the assigned course are required.
PHIL 501. Teaching Assistant Training
(2) STAFF
Prerequisite: Teaching assistant in philosophy.
Enrollment Comments: No unit credit allowed toward degree.
Instructional training. Orientation in professional conduct and responsibilities; observation of student's teaching (in the form of facultyvisits or videotaping) and follow-up conferences; discussion of teaching evaluations and workshops on pedagogical problems.
PHIL 594. Special Topics
(1-4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Consent of instructor.
Special seminar on research subjects of current interest.
PHIL 596. Directed Reading and Research
(1-12) STAFF
Prerequisite: Graduate student in philosophy; Consent of instructor.
A written proposal must be approved by the instructor and department chair.
PHIL 597. Individual Study for Master's and/or Ph.D. Examinations for Advancement to Candidacy
(1-12) STAFF
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
Enrollment Comments: No unit credit allowed toward degree.
Individual preparation for the doctoral qualifying examination.
PHIL 598. Master's Thesis Research and Preparation
(1-12) STAFF
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
Enrollment Comments: No credit allowed toward degree.
This course is for research and writing of the master's thesis.
PHIL 599. Ph.D. Dissertation Research and Preparation
(1-12) STAFF
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
Ph.D. dissertation research and preparation.