UC Santa Barbara General CatalogUniversity of California, Santa Barbara

Chemical Engineering

Engineering II, Room 3357;
Telephone (805) 893-3412
Website: www.chemengr.ucsb.edu
Chair: Rachel Segalman
Vice-Chair: Todd Squires and M. Scott Shell


 

Some courses displayed may not be offered every year. For actual course offerings by quarter, please consult the Quarterly Class Search or GOLD (for current students). To see the historical record of when a particular course has been taught in the past, please visit the Course Enrollment Histories.

Chemical Engineering
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Collapse Courses Lower Division 
CH E 5. Introduction to Chemical Engineering Design
(3) DOHERTY
Introduction to the design and analysis of processes involving chemical change in the context of chemical and biomolecular engineering. Students learn mathematical, empirical, and conceptual strategies to analyze chemical processes to assess product quality, economics, safety, and environmental issues. Focus topics include an overview of chemical and biomoleuclarengineering, evaluating and analyzing data, flowsheets, material and energy balances, economics, and unit operations.
CH E 10. Material and Energy Balances
(3) HELGESON, GORDON
Prerequisite: Chemical Engineering 5 (may be taken concurrently); Chemistry 1A-B-C or 2A-B-C; Mathematics 3A-B and Mathematics 4A or 4AI; and Engineering 3; Chemical Engineering majors only.
Elementary principles and problem solving skills required for quantitative analysis of chemical processes. Topics to be covered include macroscopic material and energy balances, reaction stoichiometry, elementary thermodynamics, and phase equilibria associated with chemical engineering processes and unit operations.
CH E 99. Introduction to Research
(1-3) STAFF
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and undergraduate advisor.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 6 units. Students are limited to5 units per quarter and 30 units total in all 98/99/198/199/199DC/199RA courses combined.
Directed study, normally experimental, to be arranged with individual faculty members. Course offers exceptional students an opportunity to participate in a research group.
Collapse Courses Upper Division 
CH E 102. Biomaterials and Biosurfaces
(3) STAFF
Recommended Preparation: Basic physical chemistry, chemistry, physics, thermodynamics and biology.
Enrollment Comments: Not open for credit to students who have completed Chemical Engineering 121.
Fundamentals of natural and artificial biomaterials and biosurfaces with emphasis on molecular level structure and function and their interactionswith the body. Design issues of grafts and biopolymers. Basic biological,biophysical and biochemical systems reviewed for nonbiologists.
CH E 107. Introduction to Biological Processing
(3) O'MALLEY, DEY
Prerequisite: Chemical Engineering 10
Familiarizes engineering students with biological processing and production at multiple scales. Chemical engineering principles will be infused with key biological concepts, including an introduction to biochemistry, cell biology, and molecular biology.
CH E 110A. Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics
(3) SHELL
Prerequisite: Chemical Engineering 10; Mathematics 4B or 4BI; Engineering majors only.
Use of the laws of thermodynamics to analyze processes encountered in engineering practice, including cycles and flows. Equations-of-state for describing properties of fluids and mixtures. Applications, including engines, turbines, refrigeration and power plant cycles, phase equilibria, and chemical-reaction equilibria.
CH E 110B. Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics
(3) HAN
Prerequisite: Chemical Engineering 110A with a minimum grade of C-; Mathematics 4B or 4BI; Engineering majors only.
Extension of Chemical Engineering 110A to cover mixtures and multiphaseequilibrium. Liquid-vapor separations calculations are emphasized. Introduction to equations of state for mixtures.
CH E 119. Current Events in Chemical Engineering
(1) STAFF
Prerequisite: Chemical Engineering 110A.
Assigned readings in technical journals on current events of interest to chemical engineers. Student groups present oral reports on reading assignments pertaining to new technologies, discoveries, industry challenges, society/government issues, professional and ethical responsibilites.
CH E 120A. Transport Processes
(4) SQUIRES
Prerequisite: Chemical Engineering 10 with a minimum grade of C- (may be taken concurrently); Mathematics 4B or 4BI; Mathematics 6A or 6AI and Mathematics 6B.
Introductory course in conceptual understanding and mathematical analysis of problems in fluid dynamics of relevance to Chemical Engineering. Emphasis is placed on performing microscopic and macroscopic mathematical analysis to understand fluid motion in response to forces.
CH E 120B. Transport Processes
(3) HELGESON, O'MALLEY, SQUIRES
Prerequisite: Chemical Engineering 10 with minimum grade of C-; Chemical Engineering 110A with minimum grade of C- (may be taken concurrently); Chemical Engineering 120A.
Introductory course in the mathematical analysis of conductive, convective and radiative heat transfer with practical applications to design of heatexchange equipment and use.
CH E 120C. Transport Processes
(3) PETERS, DEY, SQUIRES
Prerequisite: Chemical Engineering 10 with a minimum grade of C-; Chemical Engineering 110A with minimum grade of C-; Chemical Engineering 110B (may be taken concurrently) and Chemical Engineering 120B.
Introductory course in the fundamentals of mass transfer with applications to the design of mass transfer equipment.
CH E 121. Colloids and Biosurfaces
(3) STAFF
Recommended Preparation: Basic physical chemistry, chemistry, physics, thermodynamics and biology.
Enrollment Comments: Not open for credit to students who have completed Chemical Enginerring 102.
Basic forces and interactions between atoms, molecules, small particles andextended surfaces. Special features and interactions associated with (soft)biological molecules, biomaterials and surfaces: lipids, proteins, fibrous molecules (DNA), biological membranes, hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions, bio-specific and non-equilibrium interactions.
CH E 124. Advanced Topics in Transport Phenomena/Safety
(3) MCFARLAND
Prerequisite: Chemical Engineering 120A-B-C; or, Mechanical Engineering 151A-B and Mechanical Engineering 152A.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Mechanical Engineering 124.
Hazard identification and assessments, runaway reactions, emergency relief.Plant accidents and saftey issues. Dispersion and consequences of releases.
CH E 125. Principles of Bioengineering
(3) MITRAGOTRI
Applications of engineering to biological and medical systems. Introductionto drug delivery, tissue engineering, and modern biomedical devices. Design and applications of these systems are discussed.
CH E 126. Non-Newtonian Fluids, Soft Materials and Chemical Products
(3) SQUIRES, HELGESON
Prerequisite: Chemical Engineering 120C
Overview of soft materials (suspensions, gels, polymers, surfactants, emulsions, powders and granules) that arise in diverse industries, includingconsumer products, foods, advanced materials, biotechnology, and mineral and energy production. Influence of non-Newtonian rheology (shear- thickening and thinning, viscoelasticity, extension- thickening, yield stresses, normal stress differences, and metastability) upon handling, processing, production, and performance of chemical products. Strategies to design chemical products that meet performance targets, and to scale-up production. Real-world case studies and classroom demonstrations.
CH E 128. Separation Processes
(3) SCOTT
Prerequisite: Chemical Engineering 10, and 110A-B; open to Engineering majors only.
Basic principles and design techniques of equilibrium-stage separation processes. Emphasis is placed on binary distillation, liquid-liquid extraction,and multicomponent distillation.
CH E 132A. Analytical Methods in Chemical Engineering
(4) FREDRICKSON, GORDON, PETERS
Prerequisite: Mathematics 4B or 4BI; Mathematics 6A or 6AI.
Develop analytical tools to solve elementary partial differential equations and boundary value problems. Separation of variables, Laplace transforms, Sturm- Liouville theory, generalized Fourier analysis, and computer math tools.
CH E 132B. Computational Methods in Chemical Engineering
(3) FREDRICKSON, GORDON
Prerequisite: Mathematics 4B or 4BI; Mathematics 6A or 6AI and Mathematics 6B.
Numerical methods for solution of linear and nonlinear algebraic equations, optimization, interpolation, numerical integration and differentiation, initial- value problems in ordinary and partial differential equations, and boundary- value problems. Emphasis on computational tools for chemical engineering applications.
CH E 132C. Statistical Methods in Chemical Engineering
(3) PETERS
Prerequisite: Mathematics 4B or 4BI; Mathematics 6A or 6AI and Mathematics 6B.
Probability concepts and distributions, random variables, error analysis, point estimation and confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, development of empirical chemical engineering models using regression techniques, design of experiments, process monitoring based on statistical quality control techniques.
CH E 140A. Chemical Reaction Engineering
(3) MCFARLAND, SCOTT, PETERS
Prerequisite: Chemical Engineering 10 with minimum grade of C-; Chemical Engineering 110A with a minimum grade of C-; Chemical Engineering 110B (may be taken concurrently). Chemical Engineering 120A-B.
Fundamentals of chemical reaction engineering with emphasis on kinetics of homogenous and heterogeneous reacting systems. A microkinetic understanding of reaction rates is linked to reactor design, chemical conversion, and selectivity. Batch and continuous reactor designs with and without catalysts are examined.
CH E 140B. Chemical Reaction Engineering
(3) CHMELKA, MCFARLAND
Prerequisite: Chemical Engineering 110A-B, 120A-B and 140A.
Thermodynamics, kinetics, mass and energy transport considerations associated with complex homogeneous and heterogeneous reacting systems. Catalysts and catalytic reaction rates and mechanisms. Adsorption and reaction at solid surfaces, including effects of diffusion in porous materials. Chemical reactors using heterogeneous catalysts.
CH E 141. The Science and Engineering of Energy Conversion
(3) MCFARLAND
Prerequisite: Chemical Engineering 110A and 140A.
Enrollment Comments: Equivalent upper-division coursework in thermodynamics and kinetics from outside of department will be considered.
Framework for understanding the energy supply issues facing society with a focus on the science, engineering, and economic principles of the major alternatives. Emphasis will be on the physical and chemical fundamentals ofenergy conversion technologies.
CH E 146. Heterogeneous Catalysis
(3) STAFF
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Concepts and definitions. Physical and chemical methods of catalyst characterization. Adsorption, desorption, and surface reaction on well-defined surfaces. Thermodynamic and kinetic treatments of overall reactions on uniformand nonuniform surfaces. Correlations and theoretical approaches in chemical engineering catalysis.
CH E 152A. Process Dynamics and Control
(4) CHMELKA
Prerequisite: Chemical Engineering 120A-B-C and 140A.
Development of theoretical and empirical models for chemical and physical processes, dynamic behavior of processes, transfer function and block diagram representation, process instrumentation, control system design and analysis, stability analysis, computer simulation of controlled processes.
CH E 152B. Advanced Process Control
(3) STAFF
Prerequisite: Chemical Engineering 152A.
The theory, design, and experimental application of advanced process control strategies including feedforward control, cascade control, enhanced single- loop strategies, and model predictive control. Analysis of multi-loopcontrol systems. Introduction to on-line optimization.
CH E 154. Engineering Approaches to Systems Biology
(3) STAFF
Prerequisite: Chemical Engineering 170; Mathematics 4B or 4BI; Mathematics 6A or 6AI and Mathematics 6B.
Applications of engineering tools and methods to solve problems in systems biology. Emphasis is placed on integrative approaches that address multi_scale and multi-rate phenomena in biological regulation. Modeling, optimization, and sensitivity analysis tools are introduced.
CH E 160. Introduction to Polymer Science
(3) SEGALMAN
Prerequisite: Chemistry 109A-B.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Materials 160.
Introductory course covering synthesis, characterization, structure, and mechanical properties of polymers. The course is taught from a materials perspective and includes polymer thermodynamics, chain architecture, measurement and control of molecular weight as well as crystallization and glass transitions.
CH E 170. Molecular and Cellular Biology for Engineers
(3) O'MALLEY, DEY
Prerequisite: Chemical Engineering 120A-B-C, 140A and Chemistry 109C.
Familiarizes engineering students with key concepts from biochemistry, molecular biology, cell biology, and genetics. Students will apply chemicalengineering principles to describe different biological systems at multiple scales, including an introduction to bioproduction.
CH E 171. Introduction to Biochemical Engineering
(3) DEY, O'MALLEY
Prerequisite: Chemical Engineering 170.
Introduction to biochemical engineering covering cell growth kinetics, bioreactor design,enzyme processes, biotechnologies for modification of cellular information, and molecular and cellular engineering.
CH E 173. Omics-enabled Biotechnology
(3) O'MALLEY
Prerequisite: Chemical Engineering 170 or MCDB 1A.
Recommended Preparation: Chemistry 142A is recommended.
Integrates genomic, transcriptomic, metabolomic, and proteomic approaches to quantify and understand intricate biological systems. Complementary bioinformatics approaches to curate the large datasets associated with these experiments will also be discussed. Recent examples from theliterature will reinforce core concepts, ranging from applications tohuman health to the environment. By the end of the course, students should be able to design an integrated experiment that capitalizes on these “omics”-based approaches to enhance the scope of their research.
CH E 179. Biotechnology Laboratory
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Chemical Engineering 170 or MCDB 1A or Chemistry 142A-B or Consent of Instructor.
Enrollment Comments: Must have an overall grade point average of 3.3 or above.
Description: This course will provide an introduction to theoretical principles and practical methods used in modern biotechnology, genetic engineering, and synthetic biology. Topics will include protein and cellular engineering using recombinant DNA technologies, mutagenesis, library construction, and biosynthetic display technologies.
CH E 180A. Chemical Engineering Laboratory
(3) STAFF
Prerequisite: Chemical Engineering 110A and 120A-B.
Experiments in thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, heat transfer, mass transfer, and chemical processing. Analysis of results, and preparation of reports.
CH E 180B. Chemical Engineering Laboratory
(3) STAFF
Prerequisite: Chemical Engineering 120C, 128, 140A and 152A.
Experiments in mass transfer, reactor kinetics, process control, and chemical and biochemical processing. Analysis of results, and preparation of reports.
CH E 184A. Design of Chemical Processes
(3) DOHERTY, CHMELKA
Prerequisite: Chemical Engineering 110A-B, 120A-B-C, 128, 132B, 140A-B, and 152A.
Applications of chemical engineering principles to reactor and plant design. Conceptual design of chemical processes. Flowsheeting methods. Engineering cost principles and economic aspects.
CH E 184B. Design of Chemical Processes
(3) DOHERTY
Prerequisite: Chemical Engineering 184A.
The solution to comprehensive plant design problems. Use of computer process simulators. Optimization of plant design, investment and operations.
CH E 193. Internship in Industry
(1-4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Consent of Department.
Enrollment Comments: Student must have a minimum 3.0 GPA. May not be used as departmental elective. May be repeated to a maximum of 12 units.
Special projects for selected students. Offered in conjunction with engineering practice in selected industrial and research firms, under direct faculty supervision. A 2-4 page paper and an evaluation from the supervisor will be required for credit.
CH E 196. Undergraduate Research
(2-4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing, completion of 2 upper-division courses in ChemicalEngineering; consent of the instructor.
Enrollment Comments: Students must have a minimum 3.0 GPA for the preceding 3 quarters. May be repeated for up to 12 units. Not more than 3 units may be applied to departmental electives.
Research opportunities for undergraduate students. Students are expected togive regular oral presentations, actively participate in a weekly seminar, and prepare at least one written report on their research.
CH E 198. Independent Studies in Chemical Engineering
(1-5) STAFF
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor; upper-division standing; completion of 2 upper-division courses in Chemical Engineering.
Enrollment Comments: Students must have a 3.0 GPA for the preceding 3 quarters. May be repeated up to 12 units. Not more than 3 units may be applied to departmental electives. Students are limited to five units per quarter and 30 units total in all 98/99/198/199/199DC/199RA courses combined.
Directed individual studies.
Collapse Courses Graduate 
CH E 202. Biomaterials and Biosurfaces
(3) STAFF
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Recommended Preparation: Prior biochemistry, physical chemistry, or organic chemistry.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as BMSE 202.
Fundamentals of natural and artificial biomaterials and biosurfaces with emphasis on molecular level structure and function and their interactionswith the body. Design issues of grafts and biopolymers. Basic biological,biophysical and biochemical systems reviewed for nonbiologists.
CH E 210A. Fundamentals and Applications of Classical Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics
(4) SHELL
Fundamental concepts in classical thermodynamics and statistical mechanics for engineering students. Establishes the framework within which problems can be solved using methodologies that start with molecular level understanding.
CH E 210B. Advanced Topics in Equilibrium Statistical Mechanics
(3) FREDRICKSON
Recommended Preparation: Recommended preparation: a course in physical chemistry.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Materials 214.
Application of the principles of statistical mechanics and thermodynamics to treat classical fluid systems at equilibrium. Topics include liquid state theory, computer simulation methods, critical phenomena and scaling principles, interfacial statistical mechanics, and electrolyte theory.
CH E 210C. Statistical Mechanics
(3) STAFF
Prerequisite: Consent of graduate advisor.
Fundamentals of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics, kinetic theory of gases, Boltzmann equation, correlation functions, linear response theory,fluctuation- dissipation theorem, Langevin and Fokker-Planck equations.
CH E 210D. Principles of Modern Molecular Simulation Methods
(3) SHELL
Provides a broad overview of modern methods for computing the properties ofmultibody molecular systems. The course will cover: ab initio techniques, classical potential energy functions, Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics methods, free energy calculations, phase equilibria, and self- assembly/organization.
CH E 211A. Matrix Analysis and Computation
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Enrollment Comments: Students should be proficient in basic numerical methods,linear algebra, mathematically rigorous proofs, and some programming language. Same course asComputer Science 211A, ECE 210A, Geology 251A, ME 210A and Mathematics 206A.
Graduate level-matrix theory with introduction to matrix computations. SVD's, pseudoinverses, variational characterization of eigenvalues, perturbation theory, direct and iterative methods for matrix computations.
CH E 211B. Numerical Simulation
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Enrollment Comments: Students should be proficient in basic numerical methods, linear algebra, mathematically rigorous proofs, and some programming language. Same course as Computer Science 211B, ECE 210B, Geology 251B, ME 210B and Mathematics 206B.
Linear multistep methods and Runge-Kutta methods for ordinary differential equations: stability, order and convergence. Stiffness. Differential algebraic equations. Numerical solution of boundary value problems.
CH E 211C. Numerical Solution of Partial Differential Equations--Finite Difference Methods
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Enrollment Comments: Students should be proficient in basic numerical methods,linear algebra, mathematically rigorous proofs, and some programming language. Same course asComputer Science 211C, ECE 210C, Geology 251C, ME 210C and Mathematics 206C.
Finite difference methods for hyperbolic, parabolic and elliptic PDE's, with application to problems in science and engineering. Convergence, consistency, order and stability of finite difference methods. Dissipation and dispersion. Finite volume methods. Software design and adaptivity.
CH E 211D. Numerical Solution of Partial Differential Equations--Finite Element Methods
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Enrollment Comments: Students should be proficient in basic numerical methods, linear algebra, mathematically rigorous proofs, and some programming language. Same course as Computer Science 211D, ECE 210D, Geology 251D, ME 210D, and Mathematics 206D.
Weighted residual and finite element methods for the solution of hyperbolic, parabolic and elliptical partial differential equations, with applicationto problems in science and engineering. Error estimates. Standard and discontinuous Galerkin methods.
CH E 216A. Introduction to Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Techniques
(3) CHMELKA
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
An introduction to magnetic resonance theory and experimental techniques, with emphasis on quantum-mechanical descriptions of basic NMR methods for solid-state applications.
CH E 216B. Advanced Methods of Magnetic Resonance with Applications to Materials Science
(3) CHMELKA
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
This course is intended to provide an understanding of advanced methods of magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging, emphasizing new applications to current issues in materials research.
CH E 220A. Advanced Transport Processes-Laminar Flow and Convective Transport Processes
(4) SQUIRES
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Basic principles of fluid mechanics and convective transport processes. Governing equations and boundary conditions. Non-dimensionalization and scaling. Self-similar solutions and similarity transformations. Unidirectional flows. The thin gap approximation, lubrication theory and thin film dynamics.Low Reynolds number flows.
CH E 220B. Advanced Transport Processes-Laminar Flow and Convective Transport Processes
(3) SQUIRES
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Continuation of ChE 220A. Viscous flows. Application of scaling and asymptotic methods to transport problems and fluid motions; Weak convection effects; Boundary layer theories for fluid mechanics and transport processes. Introduction to Linear stability theory for interfacial and buoyancy-driven flows.
CH E 220C. Advanced Transport Processes-Mass Transfer
(3) PETERS
Basic principles of diffusional processes, multicomponent systems, diffusion with chemical reaction, penetration and surface renewal theories, turbulent transport.
CH E 220D. Complex Fluids and Rheology
(3) STAFF
Prerequisite: Chemical Engineering 220A-B
Microstructural basis of constitutive models for simple “complex fluids” (dilute suspensions of non-spherical Brownian particles). Qualitative physics that leads to viscoelastic behavior in a variety of complex fluids, including polymeric liquids (dilute solutions and melts), wormlike micelle solutions, liquid crystalline fluids, emulsions, gels, and suspensions of vesicles or cells. Relationship between microscale physics and macroscopic rheology of materials in flow, including spatial non- uniformities in material properties that arise when flow couples to concentration or molecular weight.
CH E 222A. Colloids and Interfaces I
(3) STAFF
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Materials 222A and BMSE 222A.
Introduction to the various intermolecular interactions in solutions and in colloidal systems: Van Der Waals, electrostatic, hydrophobic, solvation, H-bonding. Introduction to colloidal systems.
CH E 222B. Colloids and Interfaces II
(3) STAFF
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Enrollment Comments: Materials 222A or Chemical Engineering 222A recommended. Same course as BMSE 222B and Materials 222B.
Continuation of 222A. Interparticle interactions, coagulation, DLVO theory, steric interactions, polymer-coated surfaces, polymers in solution, thin film viscosity. Surfactant and lipid self-assembly: micelles, microemulsions. Surfaces: wetting, contact angles, surface tension. Surfactants on surfaces: langmuir-blodgett films, adsorption, adhesion. Non-equilibrium and dynamic interactions.
CH E 228. Non-Newtonian Fluids, Soft Materials and Chemical Products
(3) SQUIRES, HELGESON
Enrollment Comments: Concurrently offered with Chemical Engineering 126.
Overview of soft materials (suspensions, gels, polymers, surfactants, emulsions, powders and granules) that arise in diverse industries, including consumer products, foods, advanced materials, biotechnology, and mineral and energy production. Influence of non-Newtonian rheology (shear-thickening and thinning, viscoelasticity, extension- thickening, yield stresses, normal stress differences, and metastability) upon handling, processing, production, and performance of chemical products. Strategies to design chemical products that meet performance targets, and to scale-up production. Real-world case studies and classroom demonstrations.
CH E 230A. Advanced Theoretical Methods in Engineering
(4) PETERS
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as ME 244A.
Methods of solution of partial differential equations and boundary value problems. Linear vector and function spaces, generalized fourier analysis, Sturm-Liouville theory, calculus of variations, and conformal mapping techniques.
CH E 230B. Advanced Theoretical Methods in Engineering
(3) SQUIRES
Prerequisite: Chemical Engineering 230A and consent of instructor.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as ME 244B.
Advanced mathematical methods for engineers and scientists. Complex analysis, integral equations and green's functions. Asymptotic analysis of integrals and sums. Boundary layer methods and WKB theory.
CH E 238A. Rheology of Complex Fluids
(3) SQUIRES
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Materials 238A.
An introduction to molecular and microscale theories for the viscoelastic behavior of complex fluids: suspensions, colloidal dispersions, liquid crystals, dilute polymer solutions.
CH E 240A. Advanced Chemical Reaction Engineering
(3) MCFARLAND, GORDON
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Following review of the theory of reaction kinetics for catalyzed and noncatalyzed systems, detailed consideration is given to design and performance of catalysts and chemical reactors. Mathematical studies of stability and optimization are emphasized in relationship to mass, energy, and momentum transport.
CH E 241. Advanced Science and Engineering of Energy Conversion
(3) MCFARLAND
The course provides a framework for understanding the energy supply issues facing society with a focus on the science, engineering, and economic principles of the major alternatives. Emphasis will be on the physical and chemical fundamentals of energy conversion technologies.
CH E 246. Advanced Catalysis
(3) SCOTT
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Chemistry 264.
Theories of reaction rates. Heterogeneous and homogenous catalysis, including physical structure and characterization of catalysts. Catalyst poisoning.
CH E 248. Reaction Rate Theory
(3) PETERS
Prerequisite: Same course as Chemistry 248.
Recommended Preparation: Physical chemistry and statistical mechanics.
Advanced theoretical and computational methods for the analysis of reactionkinetics and mechanisms. Topics include transition state theory, Kramers' theory, tunneling effects, transition state search algorithms, transition path sampling, kinetic Monte Carlo, reaction coordinate and degree-of-rate-control analyses.
CH E 255. Methods in Systems Biology
(3) STAFF
Prerequisite: Prior coursework in cellular biology, mathematics; consent of instuctor.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as BMSE 255.
Fundamentals of dynamic network organization in biology (genes, metabolites). Emphasis on mathematical approaches to model and analyze complex biophysical network systems. Detailed case studies demonstrating successes of systems biology. Basic biological systems reviewed for nonbiologists.
CH E 258. Protein Design and Engineering
(3) STAFF
Recommended Preparation: Undergraduate Biochemistry and Physical Chemistry or equivalent.
Introduction to principles of the development of proteins and peptides for technological applications; including consumer products, materials, chemicals, biofuels, and medicine. Topics include protein engineering technologies, experimental and computational tools for sequence design, structuraland immunogenicity analysis.
CH E 260. Introduction to Polymer Science
(3) SEGALMAN
Enrollment Comments: Concurrently offered with Chemical Engineering 160.
Introductory course covering synthesis, characterization, structure, and mechanical properties of polymers. The course is taught from a materials perspective and includes polymer thermodynamics, chain architecture, measurement and control of molecular weight as well as crystallization and glass transitions.
CH E 272. Omics-enabled Biotechnology
(3) O'MALLEY
Enrollment Comments: Molecular and Cell Biology (undergraduate level)
Integrates genomic, transcriptomic, metabolomic, and proteomic approachesto quantify and understand intricate biological systems. Complementary bioinformatics approaches to curate the large datasets associated with these experiments are also discussed. Recent examples from the literature reinforce core concepts, ranging from applications to human health to the environment. By the end of the course, students should be able to design an integrated experiment that capitalizes on these “omics”- based approaches to enhance the scope of their research.
CH E 289A. Spectroscopy of Materials
(3) GORDON
Introduction to continuum and quantum mechanical descriptions of solid materials with emphasis on interactions of light and electrons with matter from an experimental viewpoint. Topics: Maxwell’s equations, electron and lattice waves, band theory, photoelectron and various optical spectroscopies.
CH E 290. Chemical Engineering Forum
(0.5) STAFF
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit.
Seminars and workshops focusing on current research topics and graduate student education.
CH E 291. Research Group Studies
(1-2) STAFF
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Students or instructors present recently published papers and/or results relevant to their own research.
CH E 493. Internship in Industry
(1-4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Prior departmental approval needed.
Special projects for selected students. Students pursue practical engineering experience in selected industrial and research firms, under faculty supervision.
CH E 594. Special Topics
(1-4) STAFF
Special seminar on research subjects of current interest.
CH E 596. Directed Reading and Research
(1-12) STAFF
Experimental or theoretical research undertaken under the direction of a faculty member for graduate students who have not yet advanced to candidacy.
CH E 598. Master's Thesis Research and Preparation
(1-12) STAFF
Enrollment Comments: Not applicable to course requirement for M.S. degree.
Only for research underlying the thesis and writing the thesis.
CH E 599. Dissertation Research and Preparation
(1-12) STAFF
Only for research underlying the dissertation and writing the disseration.