UC Santa Barbara General CatalogUniversity of California, Santa Barbara

Germanic and Slavic Studies

Division of Humanities and Fine Arts
Advising Offices: Phelps 4206
Administrative Offices: Phelps 5206
Telephone: (805) 893-3111
Undergraduate Advisor: Elizabeth Fair
Undergraduate e-mail: efair@hfa.ucsb.edu
Graduate Program Assistant: Jack Bailey
Graduate e-mail: jackbailey@ucsb.edu
Website: www.gss.ucsb.edu
Department Chair: Elisabeth Weber
Email: weber@gss.ucsb.edu


 

Some courses displayed may not be offered every year. For actual course offerings by quarter, please consult the Quarterly Class Search or GOLD (for current students). To see the historical record of when a particular course has been taught in the past, please visit the Course Enrollment Histories.

German
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Collapse Courses Lower Division 
GER 1. Elementary German
(5) REDER
Prerequisite: Not open for credit to students who have completed more advanced work in German.
Beginning course in German. Student acquires the basic structure of the language, communicative skills, a limited general vocabulary, correct pronunciation, and an ability to read and understand simple cultural texts.
GER 1G. Introduction to Reading German (for Graduate Students)
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in any field.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated unlimited times.
A brief introduction to the essentials of German grammar with emphasis on aspects of structure that are indispensable for reading skills (while deemphasizing those that are not). Reading texts are included from the beginning.
GER 2. Elementary German
(5) REDER
Prerequisite: Grade of P or grade of C or better in German 1. Not open for credit to students who have completed more advanced work in German.
Continuation of German 1.
GER 2G. Introduction to Reading German (for Graduate Students)
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated.
Course is a continuation of German 1G, using the same approach, with reading texts on a more complex level.
GER 3. Elementary German
(5) REDER
Prerequisite: Grade of P or grade of C or better in German 2. Not open for credit to students who have completed more advanced work in German.
Continuation of German 2.
GER 4. Intermediate German
(5) REDER
Prerequisite: Grade of P or grade of C or better in German 3. Not open for credit to students who have completed more advanced work in German.
Continuation of German 3. Expansion and refinement of linguistic and communicative skills leaned in Beginning German. Greater focus on speaking German with fluency and accuracy, reading short authentic texts, and writing coherent, organized essays.
GER 5. Intermediate German
(5) REDER
Prerequisite: Grade of P or grade of C or better in German 4. Not open for credit to students who have completed more advanced work in German.
Continuation of German 4.
GER 6. Intermediate German
(5) REDER
Prerequisite: Grade of P or grade of C or better in German 5. Not open for credit to students who have completed more advanced work in German.
Continuation of German 5.
GER 8A. Beginning German Conversation
(2) STAFF
Course designed to offer beginning German language students communicativestrategies needed by speakers and listeners in face-to face interaction. Not open to students with native fluency in German.
GER 8B. Beginning German Conversation
(2) STAFF
Prerequisite: German 1.
Course designed to offer beginning German language students communicativestrategies needed by speakers and listeners in face-to-face interaction. Not open to students with native fluency in German.
GER 8C. Beginning German Conversation
(2) STAFF
Prerequisite: German 2.
Course designed to offer beginning German language students communicativestrategies needed by speakers and listeners in face-to-face interaction. Not open to students with native fluency in German.
GER 35. The Making of the Modern World
(4) KITTLER
Description and analysis of decisive events contributing to the world we are inhabiting. Various themes presented: City planning, war and industrial warfare, technology and media- technology, ideologies of modernity, andmodern master theories.
GER 43A. Dreaming Revolutions: Introduction to Marx, Nietzsche and Freud
(4) WEBER
Enrollment Comments: Not open for credit to students who have completed German 41.
Introduction to the revolutionary theories of Karl Marx, Friedrich Nietzsche and Sigmund Freud. Explorations of three authors whose writing have profoundly changed our world.
GER 43C. Germany Today
(4) HOLLAND
Covers Germany from the fall of the Berline Wall in 1989 through today toexplore how writers, artists, musicians, intellectuals and politicians respond to the quesiton of who and what is "German."
GER 55A. Contemporary German Pop Culture
(4) HOLLAND, WEBER
Study of contempory film, music, and other facets of pop culture that have shaped the lifestyle of today's nation of Germany. Study of pop music from 1989 to today and its impact on the new emerging society of post-Wall Germany, focusing on the pointed, humorous, and sometimes scathing lyrics and pop music's ties to German youth culture.
GER 95A. Elementary Yiddish
(4) STAFF
An introduction to the Yiddish language. The goal is to convey the rediments of the grammar, and to acquire the ability both to read printed Yiddish and to read and write cursive Yiddish.
GER 95B. Intermediate Yiddish
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: German 95A or equivalent.
Continuation of German 95A with further exposure to th grammar of Yiddish. More attention given to standard literary figures (Sholem Aleichem, Peretz,etc.) and their easier works.
GER 95C. Advanced Yiddish
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: German 95B or equivalent.
Continuation of German 95B with advanced grammatical study emphasis on literary texts of some maturity and difficulty as well as contemporary Yiddish in this country, both journalistic and literary.
Collapse Courses Upper Division 
GER 101A. Advanced German
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: German 6.
Speaking, listening, reading, and writing on an advanced level, while exploring contemporary German culture. Systematic review of grammar material. Additional focus on vocabulary building. Written and oral discussionsbased on newspaper articles, literary texts, German films, and websites. Topics will vary by quarter.
GER 101B. Advanced German
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: German 6.
Speaking, listening, reading, and writing on an advanced level, while exploring contemporary German culture. Systematic review of grammar material. Additional focus on vocabulary building. Written and oral discussions based on newspaper articles, literary texts, German films, and websites. Topics will vary by quarter.
GER 101C. Advanced German
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: German 6.
Speaking, listening, reading, and writing on an advanced level, while exploring contemporary German culture. Systematic review of grammar material. Additional focus on vocabulary building. Written and oral discussionsbased on newspaper articles, literary texts, German films, and websites. Topics will vary by quarter.
GER 104. German Language and Society
(4) CHUN
Prerequisite: German 6.
Discussion of the dialects of German spoken in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland. Topics include: geographical and social varieties of standard and colloquial German (e.g., Jugendsprache); the language of email and the Internet; "linguistic" problems after reunification. Taught in German.
GER 105C. Advanced Conversation
(2) STAFF
Prerequisite: German 5
Emphasizes interactional strategies needed for communication in German, while also giving intermediate and advanced students the opportunity to discuss a wide variety of topics. Not open to students with native fluency in German.
GER 106. Advanced Reading and Writing Skills
(4) REDER, WHITE
Prerequisite: German 1-6 or equivalent
Enrollment Comments: Open to non-majors. Quarters usually offered: Fall.
Focus on the development of advanced reading and writing skills in German. In particular, we will draw on a variety of authentic materials to develop students’ ability to analyze and produce a range of genres; enhance students’ awareness of pre-, during- and post-reading strategies and how to apply them to different styles of writing; improve use of strategies to help students become more autonomous readers/writers; and develop critical skills for reading, comprehending, and writing different types of texts.
GER 107A. History of Culture
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: German 6.
Careful and close readings from the cultural history of German speaking countries. Materials, which may be revised each academic year, include documents from literature, philosophy, art, music, architecture, science, politics, and law. Taught in German.
GER 107B. History of Culture
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: German 6.
Careful and close readings from the cultural history of German speaking countries. Materials, which may be revised each academic year, include documents from literature, philosophy, art, music, architecture, science, politics, and law. Taught in German.
GER 107C. History of Culture
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: German 6.
Careful and close readings from the cultural history of German speaking countries. Materials, which may be revised each academic year, include documents from literature, philosophy, art, music, architecture, science, politics, and law. Taught in German.
GER 108. Germany Today: Media and Politics after 1989
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: German 6 or equivalent.
In the wake of reunification, Germany has struggled to come to terms withits changing political identity and pressing cultural issues, including Germany's contested status as a "nation of immigrants," extremism, environmental problems, and government surveillance. A variety of media actively engage with these issues, particularly within youth culture. This course analyzes how established and emerging media (literature, music, television, film, video, blogs, etc) shape and respond to the challenges ofthe day. Taught in German.
GER 109AAZZ. Current Trends in German Culture and Literature
(4) STAFF
Enrollment Comments: Open to non-majors.
Repeat Comments: Course may be repeated provided letter designations are different.
Introduces students to current trends in German cultural, political, and literary studies. Topics might include new interpretations of canonical texts, contemporary debates about political & ethical questions, developments in literature, media, and the arts. In English.
GER 109MA. Current Trends in German Culture and Literature
GER 111. Contemporary German Art and Politics
(4) HOLLAND
Enrollment Comments: Open to non-majors.
Repeat Comments: No Repeats
Introduces students to contemporary German culture with a focus on political thinking and artistic production. Topics will include post-reunification Germany, immigration politics, and the question of a “German” identity. Taught in English.
GER 112. Introduction to German Culture
(4) HOLLAND
Prerequisite: None
Enrollment Comments: Open to non-majors. Quarters usually offered: Spring.
German thinkers and artists shaped Western culture, leaving their mark onthe history of art, science, and politics. This course familiarizes students with key events in German history and culture and the most important figures in the modern Western tradition.
GER 113. Special Topics in German Literature
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: German 6 and 101A-B-C.
In-depth study of special topics in literary texts of German-speaking traditions. Topics will vary by instructor. Topics may include: "Science in German Literature," "Literature and human rights," "Animals in literature," "Literature and the environment." Taught in German.
GER 114. Business German
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: German 4 or equivalent
German is a key language in the European Union and the developing economies of Central and Eastern Europe. Speaking German greatly improves chances of success in today's global economy. Course is an introduction to the language typically used in business settings within German-speaking countries. It will better prepare students for business-related situations and will provide them a clearer understanding of German corporate culture by covering topics such as the application process, Emails, phone conversations, meetings, business trips.
GER 115A. Survey of German Literature
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: German 6 and 101A-B-C
Survey of the literary movements of the twentieth century.
GER 115B. Survey of German Literature
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: German 6 and German 101A-B-C
Survey of the literature of classicism and romanticism.
GER 115C. Survey of German Literature
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: German 6 and German 101A-B-C
Survey of the literary movements of the nineteenth century.
GER 116A. Representations of the Holocaust
(4) WEBER, DERWIN
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Close reading of post-Holocaust literature. Taught in English.
GER 117. Special Topics in German Culture
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: German 6 and 101A-B-C.
In-depth study of special topics important for an understanding of Germanculture, drawing on a broad range of print and visual media, music and architecture. Topics will vary by instructor and may include: "Violence and Society", "Activist Cultures," "Sports and Nationalism," "Dissident Voices," "The politics of music," "Theater in German speaking countries."Taught in German.
GER 143. The Superhuman
(4) RICKELS
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Our ongoing technologization received two theoretical frames by the end of the nineteenth century: first the theory of evolution, then psychoanalysis.In this double setting, the fantasy of the superhuman has been opening up new prospects for man-and-god.
GER 151C. Literature of Central Europe
(4) SPIEKER
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Slavic 151C and Comparative Literature 161.
Investigation of the prolific literatures of central Europe, one of the culturally and linguistically most diverse regions of the European continent that has produced writers such as Italo Svevo, Franz Kafka, Robert Musil, Bruno Schultz, and others. Readings in English.
GER 161. Classicism and Romanticism in German Literature
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing
Selected readings in English translation from the classical and romantic German authors of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.
GER 164E. Major Works in German Literature: Kafka
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
A selection of Franz Kafka's novels, short stories and diaries will be closely read and analyzed. Readings, lecture and discussion in English.
GER 164F. Major Works in German Literature: Nietzsche
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
A selection of Friedrich Nietzsche's prolific philosophical oeuvre will be closely read and analyzed. Readings, lecture and discussion in English.
GER 164G. Major Works in German Literature: Freud
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
A selection of Sigmund Freud's prolific theoretical oeuvre, as well as several case studies will be closely read and analyzed. Readings, lecture and discussion in English.
GER 164H. Major Works in German Literature: Heidegger
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
A selection of Martin Heidegger's prolific philosophical oeuvre will be closely read and analyzed. Readings, lecture and discussion in English.
GER 177A. Law, Rights, and Justice
(4) KITTLER, WEBER
Prerequisite: German 6 and German 101A-B-C.
Focused on the question of justice, this course will cover a wide varietyof topics ranging from the detective novel, and literary texts inspiredby criminal cases, to legal philosophy, human rights, and international law. Source materials may include a few documents from Greek and Roman Antiquity as well as passages from the bible, but the emphasis is on German literary, legal, and philosophical texts from the eighteenth century to the present. Taught in German.
GER 179A. Revolutions: Marx, Nietzsche, Freud
(4) WEBER
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Comparative Literature 179A.
Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud have revolutionized our world: Marx, the political and economic landscape; Nietzsche, the realm of philosophy and literature; and Freud, the way we think of our mind, sexualities, wishes and dreams. Explorations of three revolutionary challenges.
GER 179B. Mysticism
(4) WEBER
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Enrollment Comments: Not open for credit to students who have completed German 169. Same course as Comparative Literature 179B.
Analysis of German mystical writing, its roots in ancient Greek texts, revolutionary impact, links with other mystical traditions, and influence on secular literature. Texts include Hildegard von Bingen, Meister Eckhart, Mechthild von Magdeburg, Novalis, Rilke, etc. Taught in English.
GER 179C. Mediatechnology
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Enrollment Comments: Not open for credit to students who have completed German 180. Same course as Compartive Literature 179C.
Telegraph, telephone, phonograph, and film are techniques that have engendered new forms of representation, communication, and thinking. Course studies the impact of these transformations in literature and on literature. Taught in English.
GER 190. Proseminar
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: German 6 and German 101A-B-C
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 12 units, but only 4 units may be applied toward the major.
Intensive advanced seminar on topic to be determined on a quarterly basis. Taught in German.
GER 197. Senior Honors Project
(4-8) STAFF
Prerequisite: Open to senior majors only; consent of instructor.
Enrollment Comments: Students must have a 3.0 overall grade-point average and a 3.5 grade-point average in the major.
An independent study course (one to three quarters) directed by a faculty member with a carefully chosen topic and bibliography which will result in adocumented project or a senior thesis.
GER 198. Readings in German
(1-5) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; completion of 2 upper-division courses in German.
Enrollment Comments: Students must have a minimum 3.0 grade-point average for the preceding three quarters. Students are limited to 5 units per quarter and 30 units total in all 98/99/198/199/199AA-ZZ courses combined.
Independent studies in German. Individual investigations in literary fields. Readings in German.
GER 199. Independent Studies in German
(1-5) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; completion of 2 upper-division courses in German.
Enrollment Comments: Students must have a minimum 3.0 grade-point average for the preceding three quarters. Students are limited to 5 units per quarter and 30 units total in all 98/99/198/199/199AA-ZZ courses combined.
Individual investigations in literary fields.
GER 199RA. Independent Research Assistance in German
(1-5) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; completion of 2 courses in upper-division German; consent of instructor and department.
Enrollment Comments: Students must have a 3.0 grade-point average for the preceding three quarters. Students are limited to 5 units per quarter and 30 units total in all 98/99/198/199/199AA-ZZ courses combined.
Coursework shall consist of faculty supervised research assistance.
Collapse Courses Graduate 
GER 210. Seminar in Literary Theory and Criticism
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Topics in literary theory to be determined on a quarterly basis.
GER 262A. Applied Linguistics
(4) CHUN
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Interdisciplinary 262A.
Overview of the basic theoretical principles of second language acquisitionas they apply to language teaching and learning. Discussion of different methodologies of foreign language teaching and the history of those used in the U.S.; special emphasis on current methodologies.
GER 270. Theories of the Modern
(4) SPIEKER
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Art History 296A.
Analysis of theories and critiques of modernism and modernity from Benjaminto Adorno and Derrida, with special focus on the historical avantgarde.
GER 500. Practicum for Teaching Assistants
(2-4) CHUN
Enrollment Comments: Units earned in this course, which is required of all teaching assistants, do not apply toward completion of the M.A. or Ph.D. requirement.
Subject oriented, designed to relate directly to the teaching of a particular course in progress, to improve the skills and effectiveness of the department's teaching assistants.
GER 596. Directed Reading and Research
(2-4) STAFF
Prerequisite: German 210A-B or equivalent. Graduate standing; consent of instructor, graduate adviser and department chair.
Enrollment Comments: Letter grade only.
Individualized instruction. A written proposa must be approved by department chair, to include a description of the course content and a reading list.
GER 597. Individual Study for Master's Comprehensive Examinations and Ph.D. Examinations
(1-12) STAFF
Prerequisite: German 201A-B or equivalent. Graduate standing; consent of graduate adviser
Enrollment Comments: No unit credit allowed toward advanced degree(s). Enrollment limited to 12 units per examination.
Instructor should normally be the student's major professor or chair of thedoctoral committee. Enrollment must be approved by graduate adviser.
GER 598. Master's Thesis Research and Preparation
(1-6) STAFF
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 12 units, but only 4 units may be applied toward master's degree in german.
Instructor should be chair of student's thesis committee.
GER 599. Ph.D. Dissertation Research and Preparation
(2-8) STAFF
Prerequisite: German 201A-B or equivalent. Advancement to candidacy; consent of graduate adviser.
Enrollment Comments: (S/U grading only.)
Only for preparation of the dissertation. Instructor should be the chair ofthe student's doctoral committee.

 
Slavic
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Collapse Courses Lower Division 
SLAV 1. Elementary Russian
(5) STAFF
Comprehensive introduction to Russian. Focus on developing basic communicative skills (speaking, listening comprehension, reading, writing) within theframework of contemporary Russian culture. Students acquire a basic grammatical framework for further language study. Audio, visual, and web-based materials included.
SLAV 2. Elementary Russian
(5) STAFF
Prerequisite: Slavic 1 or equivalent.
Continuation of Slavic 1.
SLAV 3. Elementary Russian
(5) STAFF
Prerequisite: Slavic 2 or equivalent.
Continuation of Slavic 2.
SLAV 4. Intermediate Russian
(5) STAFF
Prerequisite: Slavic 3.
Focuses on developing fluency, expanding vocabulary, and acquiring basic reading and writing skills. Comprehensive review of basic Russian grammar; introduction to participles and verbal adverbs. Audio, video, and web-based materials are an integral part of the course.
SLAV 5. Intermediate Russian
(5) STAFF
Prerequisite: Slavic 4.
Focuses on developing fluency, expanding vocabulary, and acquiring basic reading and writing skills. Comprehensive review of basic Russian grammar; introduction to participles and verbal adverbs. Audio, video, and web-based materials are an integral part of the course.
SLAV 6. Intermediate Russian
(5) STAFF
Prerequisite: Slavic 5.
Focuses on developing fluency, expanding vocabulary, and acquiring basic reading and writing skills. Comprehensive review of basic Russian grammar; introduction to participles and verbal adverbs. Audio, video, and web-based materials are an integral part of the course.
SLAV 8A. Russian Conversation
(2) STAFF
Prerequisite: Slavic 2.
Enrollment Comments: Not open for credit to students who have completed Russian 8A.
Course designed to offer beginning and intermediate Russian language students communicative strategies needed by speakers and listeners in face-to-face interaction. Not appropriate for students with a background in spoken Russian.
SLAV 8B. Russian Conversation
(2) STAFF
Prerequisite: Slavic 2.
Enrollment Comments: Not open for credit to students who have completed Russian 8B.
Course designed to offer beginning and intermediate Russian language students communicative strategies needed by speakers and listeners in face-to-face interaction. Not appropriate for students with a background in spoken Russian.
SLAV 8C. Russian Conversation
(2) STAFF
Prerequisite: Slavic 2.
Enrollment Comments: Not open for credit to students who have completed Russian 8C.
Course designed to offer beginning and intermediate Russian language students communicative strategies needed by speakers and listeners in face-to-face interaction. Not appropriate for students with a background in spoken Russian.
SLAV 33. Russian Culture
(4) SPIEKER
Enrollment Comments: This course is designed for first and second year students.
Analyzes crucial trends and issues in Russian culture in their historical, social, and technological settings, from the rise of Moscow in the fifteenth century to post-Soviet Russia. All lectures and readings are in English.
SLAV 35. Short Fiction by Major Russian Writers
(4) WELD
Survey of short fiction by major Russian short story writers such as Gogol, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Bunin, Babel, Nabokov, Petrushevskaya, and Pelevin. Analyzes short story as form and examines works in literaryand cultural context. Lectures and readings in English. Designed for first and second year students.
SLAV 99. Introduction to Research
(1-4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Consent of department and instructor.
Enrollment Comments: Students must have an overall GPA of 3.0. May be repeated to a maximum of 8units, but only 4 units may be applied toward the major. Students are limited to 5 units per quarter and 30 units total in all 98/99/198/199/199AA-ZZ courses combined.
Independent research under the guidance of a faculty member. Exceptional students are offered an opportunity to undertake independent or collaborativeresearch or to act as interns for faculty-directed research projects.
Collapse Courses Upper Division 
SLAV 101A. Advanced Russian
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Slavic 6.
Continued development of oral and written fluency. Special attention to development of reading skills through a variety of texts related to Russian culture. Systematic review of advanced grammar. Compositions, translations and oral presentations required. Periodic screenings of Russian films.
SLAV 101B. Advanced Russian
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Slavic 6.
Continued development of oral and written fluency. Special attention to development of reading skills through a variety of texts related to Russian culture. Systematic review of advanced grammar. Compositions, translations and oral presentations required. Periodic screenings of Russian films.
SLAV 101C. Advanced Russian
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Slavic 6.
Continued development of oral and written fluency. Special attention to development of reading skills through a variety of texts related to Russian culture. Systematic review of advanced grammar. Compositions, translations and oral presentations required. Periodic screenings of Russian films.
SLAV 101D. Advanced Russian
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Slavic 6.
Continued development of oral and written fluency. Special attention to development of reading skills through a variety of texts related to Russian culture. Systematic review of advanced grammar. Compositions, translations, and oral presentations required. Periodic screenings of Russian films.
SLAV 101E. Advanced Russian
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Slavic 6.
Continued development of oral and written fluency. Special attention to development of reading skills through a variety of texts related to Russian culture. Systematic review of advanced grammar. Compositions, translations, and oral presentations required. Periodic screenings of Russian films.
SLAV 101F. Advanced Russian
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Slavic 6.
Continued development of oral and written fluency. Special attention to development of reading skills through a variety of texts related to Russian culture. Systematic review of advanced grammar. Compositions, translations, and oral presentations required. Periodic screenings of Russian films.
SLAV 110A. Advanced Russian Conversation
(2) STAFF
Prerequisite: Slavic 5 (may be taken concurrently).
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 4 units.
The advanced conversation series gives advanced students an opportunity to discuss a wide variety of topics. The course is based on active participation and includes individual presentations. Assignments and testing given orally.
SLAV 110B. Advanced Russian Conversation
(2) STAFF
Prerequisite: Slavic 5 (may be taken concurrently).
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 4 units.
The advanced conversation series gives advanced students an opportunity to discuss a wide variety of topics. The course is based on active participation and includes individual presentations. Assignments and testing given orally.
SLAV 117AAZZ. Great Russian Writers
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 24 units provided letter designations are different, but only 12 units may be applied toward the major.
Intensive study of one author. Readings supplemented by select criticism. Readings and lectures in English. Pushkin, Gogol, Leskov, Turgenev, Goncharov, Chekhov, Dostoevsky,Tolstoy, Nabokov, Bulgakov
SLAV 117A. Pushkin
SLAV 117B. Gogol
SLAV 117C. Leskov
SLAV 117D. Turgenev
SLAV 117E. Goncharov
SLAV 117F. Chekhov
SLAV 117G. Dostoevsky
SLAV 117H. Tolstoy
SLAV 117I. Nabokov
SLAV 117J. Bulgakov
SLAV 120. Russian Drama
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Plays from the classic, romantic, and realistic periods; Chekhov's innovative works, as well as dramas represntative of various trends before and after 1917. Readings and discussion in English.
SLAV 121. The Russian Short Story
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Slavic 6; upper-division standing.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 8 units.
Analysis and discussion of various forms of the short story by Russian writers.
SLAV 122. The Russian Novella
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Slavic 6; upper-division standing.
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 8 units, but only 4 units may beapplied toward the major.
In Russian literature the novella is a genre quite distinct from the short story and the novel. All major writers of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries created important works in this form, so that a vast field for exploration and examination exists for such a genre course. Taught in Russian.
SLAV 123A. Nineteenth-Century Russian Literature I
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Enrollment Comments: Not open to credit for students who have completed Slavic 115A.
Introduction to Russian literary culture from 1800 to 1850. Readings by Pushkin, Lermontov, Gogol, Dostoevsky, and others. Readings is English.
SLAV 123B. Nineteenth-Century Russian Literature II
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Enrollment Comments: Not open to credit for students who have complete Slavic 115B.
Introduction to Russian literary culture from 1850 to 1900. Readings by Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Goncharov, Turgenev, Leskov, Saltykov-Shchedrin, Chekhov.Taught in English.
SLAV 123C. Twentieth-Century Russian Literature I
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Enrollment Comments: Not open to credit for students who have completed Slavic 125A.
Intensive study of particular authors, genres, literary movements, and selected topics in Russian literature from 1900-1954. Taught in English.
SLAV 123D. Twentieth-Century Russian Literature II
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Enrollment Comments: Not open to credit for students who have completed Slavic 125B.
Intensive study of particular authors, genres, literary movements, and selected topics in Russian literature after World War II. Taught in English.
SLAV 124. Twentieth-Century Poetry
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Slavic 6; upper-division standing.
Introduction to twentieth-century Russian poetry. The "silver age" and Russian modernism. Avantgarde poetry. Post-war trends in Russian poetry. Readings by Briusov, Blok, Akhmatova, Mandelshtam, Esenin, Mayakovsky, Pasternak,Brodsky, and others. Readings in Russian.
SLAV 130A. The Avantgarde in Russia
(4) SPIEKER
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Art History 144A. Not open for credit to students who have completed Russian 144A or Slavic 144A.
The Russian Avantgarde in its European context. The avantgarde and the revolution of 1917. Analysis of key figures and movements within the Russian Avantgarde. Taught in English.
SLAV 130B. Russian Cinema
(4) SPIEKER
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Enrollment Comments: Not open for credit to students who have completed Slavic 119.
Introduction to the development of Soviet cinema from the early days to thepresent. A focal point will be the interaction between politics/ideology and film in Russia. Major directors such as Eisenshtein and Tarkovski will betreated extensively. Readings and lectures in English.
SLAV 130C. Contemporary Art in Russia and Eastern Europe
(4) SPIEKER
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Art History 144C. Not open for credit to students who have completed Russian 144C or Slavic 144C.
Study of central intellectual and aesthetic trends in the late Soviet period and in contemporary post-Soviet Russia and Eastern Europe. Analysis of literary texts and the visual arts. Taught in English.
SLAV 130D. Russian Art
(4) SPIEKER
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Art History 144D. Not open for credit to students who have completed Russian 118 or Slavic 118.
Introduction to Russian art and aesthetic theory from the beginning to the present. Readings and lectures in English.
SLAV 130E. Masters of Soviet Cinema
(4) SPIEKER
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Enrollment Comments: Not open for credit to students who have completed Slavic 167C.
Introduction to some of the great directors in Russian cinema. Analysis of films and theoretical writings. Study of key theoretical concepts. Taught in English. E. Eisenshtein.
SLAV 145. Introduction to Slavic Language and Linguistics
(4) MCCLAIN
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Introduction to the history and development of the Slavic languages. Topicsinclude dialects, language contact, sociolinguistics, gender issues, and language policy. Taught in English.
SLAV 151C. Literature of Central Europe
(4) SPIEKER
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as German 151C and Comparative Literature 161.
Investigation of the prolific literatures of central Europe, one of the culturally and linguistically most diverse regions of the European continent that has produced writers such as Italo Svevo, Franz Kafka, Robert Musil, Bruno Schultz, and others. Readings in English.
SLAV 152A. Slavic and East European Folklore
(4) MCCLAIN
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Enrollment Comments: Not open for credit to students who have completed Slavic 151.
Introduction to the calendar cycle, rituals, dance, music, and folkcraft ofthe Slavs and other East European peoples.
SLAV 152B. Language and Cultural Identity
(4) MCCLAIN
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Enrollment Comments: Not open for credit to students who have completed Slavic 163.
Exploration of the way language is used to help construct cultural identityin Eastern Europe. Topics include the relationship between language and dialect and the use of language and other cultural symbols to identify self and other. Taught in English.
SLAV 152C. Ideology and Representation
(4) MCCLAIN
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Enrollment Comments: Not open for students who have completed Slavic 180.
How does the representation of the "enemy" during a conflict influence our attitudes toward that conflict? An examination of the images of the opponent in literature, film and journalism. special emphasis on Eastern Europe.
SLAV 156. Concepts of Nothingness
(4) SPIEKER
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Enrollment Comments: Not open for credit to students who have completed Russian 156.
"Nothing" is one of the central concepts of Russian culture and civilization throughout the centuries. The class analyzes "nothingness" in orthodox religion, nineteenth and twentieth-century literature, avantgarde art, and soviet popular culture. Taught in English.
SLAV 164B. Science Fiction in Eastern Europe
(4) MCCLAIN
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Comparative Literature 154. Not open for credit to students who have completed Slavic 154.
The genre of science fiction and its development in literature and film in the various cultures of eastern europe. Topics include utopia, dystopia,technology, the "mad" scientist, etc. Taught in English.
SLAV 164C. Women in Russian Literature
(4) MCCLAIN
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Enrollment Comments: Not open for credit to students who have completed Slavic 162.
A survey of the roles of women in Russian literature. Course analyzes both the presentation of women by male writers and works by women writers. Authors: Durova, Pavlova, Mandelshtam, Chukovskaya, Ginzburg, Akhmatova, Tsvetaeva, and others. Lectures and readings in English.
SLAV 168. Russian Thought and Philosophy
(4) SPIEKER
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Study of key texts and movements in the development of Russian thought, from the enlightenment to the revolution: enlightenment, mysticism, Schellingianism, Chaadaev, Slavophilism, Hegelianism, the 1860's, populism,Soloviev, Marxism. Taught in English.
SLAV 182. On the Margins
(4) MCCLAIN
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
An analysis of the representation of marginalized population in Europe and the United States. How do the stereotypes in literature, film, and journalism help to create and maintain marginalized status?
SLAV 192. Internships In Slavic Studies
(1-4) SPIEKER
Enrollment Comments: Open to non-majors. Only 4 units may count toward the major.
Various ad-hoc internship opportunities designed to contribute in substantial ways to a student's academic experience, giving them valuable expertise in a broad variety of fields and bridging the bap between academic course work and its practical applications.
SLAV 197. Senior Thesis in Russian
(4-8) STAFF
Prerequisite: Senior standing; consent of instructor.
Enrollment Comments: Students must have a 3.0 GPA. May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 8 units. Not open for credit to students who have completed Russian 197.
An independent study course (one or two quarters) directed by a faculty member with a carefully chosen topic which results in a documented project or a senior thesis.
SLAV 198. Readings in Russian
(1-5) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; completion of 2 courses in Slavic.
Enrollment Comments: Students must have a minimum 3.0 GPA for the preceding 3 quarters and are limited to 5 units per quarter and 30 units total in all 98/99/198/199/199AA-ZZ courses combined. May be repeated for credit in combination with Russian 198 to a maximum of 6 units.
Guided reading on a subject not covered in the regularly offered courses.
SLAV 199. Independent Studies in Russian
(1-5) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; completion of 2 upper-division courses in Slavic.
Enrollment Comments: Students must have a minimum GPA of 3.0 for the preceding 3 quarters and are limited to 5 units per quarter and 30 units total in all 98/99/198/199/199AA-ZZ courses combined.
Independent Studies in Russian.
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SLAV 596. Directed Reading in Research
(2-4) STAFF
Enrollment Comments: Letter grade. Minimum of two units per quarter. No more than half the unitsnecessary for the master's degree may be taken in Slavic 596.
Individual tutorial. A written proposal for each tutorial must be approved by department chair and filed with graduate division.