UC Santa Barbara General CatalogUniversity of California, Santa Barbara

East Asian Languages and Cultural Studies

Division of Humanities and Fine Arts
Humanities and Social Sciences 4001
Telephone: (805) 893-5478
E-mail: gd-east@eastasian.ucsb.edu
Website: www.eastasian.ucsb.edu
Department Chair: Katherine Saltzman-Li


 

Some courses displayed may not be offered every year. For actual course offerings by quarter, please consult the Quarterly Class Search or GOLD (for current students). To see the historical record of when a particular course has been taught in the past, please visit the Course Enrollment Histories.

Chinese
 (
Show All
 | 
Hide All
)
Collapse Courses Lower Division 
CHIN 1. Elementary Modern Chinese
(5) STAFF
The beginning course in Chinese. The student acquires a basic knowledge of the grammar, a limited general vocabulary, correct pronunciation, and an ability to read and understand simple texts. Weekly laboratory assignments support and enhance classroom learning.
CHIN 1NH. First Year Chinese Heritage
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: consent of instructor
Enrollment Comments: Not open for credit to students who have completed Chinese 1N.
Intended for Chinese heritage speakers who wish to learn to read and write Chinese. Content is similar to Chinese 1 with less emphasis on developing oral skills.
CHIN 2. Elementary Modern Chinese
(5) STAFF
Recommended Preparation: Chinese 1.
Continuation of Chinese 1.
CHIN 2NH. First Year Chinese Heritage
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Chinese 1NH
Enrollment Comments: Not open for credit to students who have completed Chinese 2N.
Continuation of Chinese 1NH.
CHIN 3. Elementary Modern Chinese
(5) STAFF
Recommended Preparation: Chinese 2.
Continuation of Chinese 2.
CHIN 3NH. First Year Chinese Heritage
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Chinese 2NH
Enrollment Comments: Not open to students who have completed Chinese 3N.
Continuation of Chinese 2NH.
CHIN 4. Intermediate Modern Chinese
(5) STAFF
Recommended Preparation: Chinese 3.
Continuation of Chinese 3.
CHIN 4NH. Second Year Chinese Heritage
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Chinese 3NH
Continuation of Chinese 3NH.
CHIN 5. Intermediate Modern Chinese
(5) STAFF
Recommended Preparation: Chinese 4.
Continuation of Chinese 4.
CHIN 5NH. Second Year Chinese Heritage
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Chinese 4NH
Enrollment Comments: Not open for credit to students who have completed Chinese 5N.
Continuation of Chinese 4NH.
CHIN 6. Intermediate Modern Chinese
(5) STAFF
Recommended Preparation: Chinese 5.
Continuation of Chinese 5.
CHIN 8A. Chinese Conversation
(4) STAFF
Recommended Preparation: Chinese 3 (Elementary Chinese, NON-HERITAGE)
The course is designed to increase facility and naturalness of delivery in simple dialogue. This course is designed for the students who have finished first year Chinese.
CHIN 8B. Chinese Conversation
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Chinese 8A or intructor approval.
The course is designed to increase facility and naturalness of delivery in simple dialogue.
CHIN 26. New Phenomena in 21st Century Chinese
(4) YU
Prerequisite: None
Recommended Preparation: One year of Chinese Language
The Chinese language today consists of a number of new words, phrases and expressions from languages such as English and Japanese. This course is to explore the contact and its impact on Chinese language and society in the 21st century.
CHIN 32. Contemporary Chinese Religions
(4) YANG
Prerequisite: None
Recommended Preparation: None
Examines Chinese popular religion, Daoism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Christianity, and Islam as shaped and transformed by revolution and nationalism, and the recent rapid commercialization, urbanization, and globalization of China. Religiosity and changing notions of self, family, gender, community, and citizenship.
CHIN 35. Introduction to Taiwan Literature
(4) TU
Provides basic introduction to the historical background and major writers of Taiwan literature in its development since the 19th century. Topics: sociopolitical and cultural changes, literary trends and writing characteristics from the Japanese colonial period to the present.
CHIN 40. Popular Culture in Modern Chinese Societies
(4) BERRY
Provides an overview of Chinese popular culture in China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong. From fiction to film, music to MTV, and from cartoons to Karaoke, this course proves the popular as it has manifested itself in the modern Chinese societies.
CHIN 50. Introduction to Chinese Literature: A Regional Approach
(4) BYRNES
Prerequisite: None
Embraces the complexity of literatures in China rather than the uniformity of Chinese literature. Taking the exotic cultures of China's southwest as an example, explores how center and periphery interact within the constitution of literary history.
CHIN 90AAZZ. Topics on China
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: none
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit providing letter designations are different
Introduction to an aspect of China i.e., culture, history. Contact Department of East Asian Languages and Culture for the specific topic.
CHIN 90CB. Topics on China
CHIN 99. Independent Study in Chinese
(1-5) STAFF
Prerequisite: Minimum 3.0 cumulative GPA
Enrollment Comments: Students must have a cumulative 3.0 for the proceeding 1 quarter(s). Students must have a minimum 3.0 GPA. Limited to 5 units per quarter and 30 units total in all 98/99/198/199/199AA-ZZ courses combined.
Introduction to independent research in Chinese. Topic and content are decided by the supervising Professor in the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultural Studies.
CHIN 99RA. Independent Research Assistance in Chinese
(1-4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Minimum 3.0 cumulative GPA
Enrollment Comments: Students must have a cumulative 3.0 for the proceeding 1 quarter(s). Students must have a cumulative 3.0 GPA for the preceding 1 quarter. Students are limited to 5 units per quarter and 30 units total in all 98/99/198/199/199AA-ZZ courses combined.
Research details are decided by the supervising Professor in the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultural Studies.
Collapse Courses Upper Division 
CHIN 101A. Introduction to Classical Chinese
(4) STAFF
Recommended Preparation: Chinese 6
The grammar and vocabulary of classical Chinese. Readings concentrate on philosophical and historical works from the pre-Han period, with some selections from later prose and poetry. Students with some familiarity with Chinese characters (through another Asian language) but not modern Chinese will be accommodated.
CHIN 101B. Introduction to Classical Chinese
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Chinese 101A
Recommended Preparation: Chinese 6
The grammar and vocabulary of classical Chinese. Readings concentrate on philosophical and historical works from the Pre-Han period, with some selections from later prose and poetry. Students with some familiarity with Chinese characters (through another Asian language) but not modern Chinese will be accommodated.
CHIN 101C. Introduction to Classical Chinese
(4) STAFF
Recommended Preparation: Chinese 6
The grammar and vocabulary of classical Chinese. Readings concentrate on philosophical and historical works from the Pre-Han period, with some selections from later prose and poetry. Students with some familiarity with Chinese characters (through another Asian language) but not modern Chinese will be accommodated.
CHIN 102. Chin 102: Advanced Chinese Conversation
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Chin 6 or consent of instructor
Recommended Preparation: Chin 6
Enrollment Comments: Open to non-majors. Designed for majors. Quarters usually offered: Winter, Spring, Summer, Fall.
Designed to further develop an intermediate to high level and put emphasis on spoken language competence within situations such as work places or in social activities.
CHIN 103. Reading and Writing in Chinese
(4) STAFF
Designed to enhance reading and writing skills in Chinese for students who have finished second year Chinese.
CHIN 104. The Buddhist Influence on Chinese Language and Culture
(4) YU
Prerequisite: Upper division standing or instructor approval
Recommended Preparation: Either CHIN 101A, or CHIN 101B, or CHIN 127A, or CHIN 127B, or CHIN 127C
Exploratory study of non-Chinese influences on Chinese language and culture as demonstrated by the language of Buddhist sutras translated into Chinese.
CHIN 106A. Seminar in Chinese Literary Translation
(4) TU
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; consent of instructor.
Designed to introduce various approaches to translation, especially the techniques of translating literary works from Chinese into English. Published translation texts are provided as the main vehicle for the analysis and discussion of translation problems in order to learn and develop practical skills of translation.
CHIN 115A. Imagism, Haiku, and Chinese Poetry
(4) TU
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
A comprehensive study of the nature and principles of the haiku and of classical Chinese poetry, their influence on the western imagists, and the theoretical and experimental achievements of the major imagist poets in thedevelopment of modern English poetry. Taught in English.
CHIN 121. Seminar on Taiwan Literature
(4) TU
Prerequisite: Upper division and Chinese 6 or instructor approval
Focus on major issues of Taiwan literature from Japanese occupation (1895-1945) to the present with regard to the interaction of Taiwan's native cultures, China's grand tradition and foreign influences during the historical development.
CHIN 122A. Advanced Modern Chinese
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Chinese 6
Advanced practice in grammar and composition.
CHIN 122B. Advanced Modern Chinese
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Chinese 122A or instructor approval
Advanced practice in grammar and composition.
CHIN 122C. Advanced Modern Chinese
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Chinese 122B or instructor approval
Advanced practice in grammar and composition.
CHIN 124A. Readings in Modern Chinese Literature
(4) YU
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Recommended Preparation: Three years of Chinese language and one quarter of Classical Chinese (check with Professor Yu before enrolling)
Advanced readings in the Chinese language in fiction, drama, and poetry written after 1919. Designed especially for returned students from the education abroad program and students with advanced Chinese background.
CHIN 124B. Readings in Modern Chinese Literature
(4) YU
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Advanced readings in the Chinese language in fiction, drama, and poetry written after 1919. Designed especially for returned students from the education abroad program and students with advanced Chinese background.
CHIN 125. Business Chinese
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Chinese 6 or instructor approval
A course intended to equip the properly qualified student to conduct business in modern Chinese. Emphasis will be placed on using appropriate vocabulary in realistic situations.
CHIN 126A. Advanced Readings in Taiwan Literature
(4) TU
Prerequisite: Chinese 6 or consent of instructor.
A selection of texts in Chinese by representative authors; literature during the Japanese rule (1895-1945). Designed for advanced students to gain an overall view of achievements of major writers in different genres.
CHIN 126B. Advanced Readings in Taiwan Literature
(4) TU
Prerequisite: Chinese 6 or consent of instructor.
A selection of texts in Chinese by representative authors; works after WW II to the present. Designed for advanced students to gain an overall view of achievements of major writers in different genres.
CHIN 127A. Fourth Year Chinese
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Chinese 122C or equivalent.
Course series for students who have completed third year Chinese. Extensive reading and discussion of colloquial versus formal usage of Chinese are the major focus of the course.
CHIN 127B. Fourth Year Chinese
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Chinese 127A.
Course series for students who have completed third-year Chinese. Extensive reading and discussion of colloquial versus formal usage of Chinese are the major focus of the course.
CHIN 127C. Fourth Year Chinese
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Chinese 127B.
Course series for students who have completed third-year Chinese. Extensive reading and discussion of colloquial versus formal usage of Chinese are the major focus of the course.
CHIN 132A. Special Topics in Classical Chinese Poetry
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing. Completion of Chinese 6.
Topics focus on major themes in classical poetry with emphasis on Buddhist, Taoist, and symbolist poems in pre-modern period. Readings in Chinese; lectures and discussions in English.
CHIN 132B. Special Topics in Modern Chinese Poetry
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Topics focus on major trends of modern poetry developed in mainland China and Taiwan with particular attention to romanticism, realism, and modernismafter contact with the West. Readings in Chinese, lectures and discussions in English.
CHIN 133. Advanced Readings in Classical Prose
(2-4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Readings in various periods and genres (history, philosophy, the essay, prose narrative).
CHIN 136. Advanced Readings in Vernacular Literature
(4) YU
Prerequisite: upper division standing
Repeat Comments: May be repeated for credit up to a maximum of 12 units but only 4 units maybe applied toward the Chinese or Asian Studies major.
Readings in novels of the Ming and Ch'ing periods.
CHIN 138A. Special Topics in Taiwan Studies - Humanities
(4) STAFF
Repeat Comments: May be repeated for credit in the major to a maximum of 8 units providing topics are different.
Special topics in Taiwan studies with respect to literature, history, and culture from the period of Japanese rule (1895-1945) to the present, including modernity, national identity, intellectual movements, and popular culture. Topics and reads will vary with instructors.
CHIN 138B. Special Topics in Taiwan Studies - Social Science
(4) STAFF
Repeat Comments: May be repeated for credit in the major to a maximum of 8 units providing topics are different
Special topics in Taiwan studies with respect to historical, economic, political, cultural, and social changes in Taiwan from the period of Japanese rule (1895-1945) to the present. Topics and readings will vary with instructors.
CHIN 139. China in Translation: Theory, Art, History
(4) MAZANEC
Prerequisite: Upper Division Standing
Uses the case study of translations into and out of China- long regarded as a civilization distinct from west- to explore themes in translation studies. Topics: ideograms, orientalism, modernization, world literature, annotations, musicality, poetic license, adaptation.
CHIN 143. Urban Legends: Traditional Chinese Stories and Their Afterlives
(4) LI
Prerequisite: upper division standing or instructor approval
Masterworks of fiction from the Ming and Qing periods as products of urban culture in late imperial and contemporary China. Stories by Feng Menglong, Li Yu, tales by Pu Songling, and excerpts from classic novels.
CHIN 144. Women Writers of Late Imperial China
(4) LI
A study of Chinese women writers in the late imperial period (roughly 1500-1900), a newly rediscovered part of China's literary history. Examination of their personal lives and writings in relation to the Chinese literary tradition, women's history and feminist criticism.
CHIN 146. Poetic Culture in late Imperial China and Beyond
(4) LI
An examination of the role poetry played in both social and individual lives in late imperial China, with particular attention to self-expression and literary community. Relevant practices in later times and in Japan and Korea are also covered.
CHIN 147A. Landscapes of Desolation in the Age of the Chinese Economic Miracle
(4) BYRNES
Prerequisite: Upper Division Standing or instructor approval
Explores how artists, filmmakers and writers, from China and elsewhere, have responded to environmental degradation in China, and how they have contributed to the production of a new mode of Chinese landscape representation - the landscape of desolation.
CHIN 148. Historic Lives
(4) STAFF
A study of selected notable lives from early and middle China for their contributions to Chinese history and literature. Subjects include Confucious, the First Emperor, the recluse Tao Yuanming, the usurper Empress Wu, the Buddhist Sixth Patriarch, the "post-historian" Du Fu, and the female song- lyricist Li Qingzhao.
CHIN 150. The Language of Vernacular Chinese Literature
(4) YU
Recommended Preparation: Chinese 127A-B-C or Chinese 124.
Enrollment Comments: Concurrently offered with CHIN 250.
Repeat Comments: May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 8 units.
Early Mandarin as represented in selections from vernacular Chinese fiction of the 16th through 18th centuries. Primarily concerned with the syntactical and semantic features employed in the reading selections. Also considers the issue of literary expression.
CHIN 152. Pedagogical Chinese Grammar
(4) YU
Recommended Preparation: Chinese 127C
Enrollment Comments: Concurrently offered with Chin 252.
Provides an overview of Chinese grammar and focuses on topics relevant to the CFL teacher. Analyzes inter-language errors in Chinese learners.
CHIN 153. Introduction to Historical Chinese Syntax
(4) YU
Recommended Preparation: Chinese 101C or equivalent, Linguistics 108 and 109.
Provides students with opportunities to explore and examine the mechanisms and the motivations of syntactic change in Chinese in 3rd C BC-21st century
CHIN 163A. Sex, Drugs, and Chinese Meditation
(4) STEAVU
Prerequisite: Upper division standing
Charts the development of alchemy in China, from its origins as a laboratory science devoted to the compounding of elixirs of immortality to its later incarnations as a Buddhist and Daoist process of self-cultivation.
CHIN 163B. Chinese Martial Arts Through Film
(4) STEAVU
Prerequisite: One course in humanities or social science
Examines how the medium of film is employed in forging an image of Chinese culture as "martial" and "spiritual." Examples from Hong Kong, mainland Chinese, and American cinema are considered.
CHIN 166B. Taoist Traditions of China
(4) POWELL
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Religious Studies 166B.
A study of the classical sources of Taoism, followed by a consideration of the varieties of religious practice which developed from those sources.
CHIN 166C. Confucian Traditions: The Classical Period
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: upper division standing
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Religious Studies 166C.
A treatment of the origins of Confucianism and of its development through the Han Dynasty (to A.D.200), with special attention to the variety of humane and spiritual disciplines which came to be called "Confucian." Emphasis on the interpretation of primmary texts like the Analects, the Mencius, the Hsun Tzu, etc.
CHIN 170. New Taiwan Cinema
(4) BERRY
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Critical survey of the new Taiwan cinema (1982-86) movement and its representative filmmakers Edward Yang and Hou Hsiao-hsien. Works by other contemporary directors such as Tsai Ming-liang, and Chen Kuo-fu are also analyzed.
CHIN 171. Modern China Through Film
(4) YANG
Survey of social change in 20th century China, Hong Kong, Taiwan through representation in film. Topics include: collectivization, gender and the state, revolution and iconoclasm, transnational culture, nationalism, rural-to-urban migration, and consumerism.
CHIN 172. Fiction and Film in Contemporary China
(4) BERRY
Presents a critical historical overview of Chinese literature and film from 1949 to the present. In addition to writers and filmmakers from mainland China such as Mo Yan and Zhang Yimou, course considers literary and cinematic development from Hong Kong, Taiwan, and the Chinese diaspora.
CHIN 174. Hong Kong Cinema
(5) BERRY
A critical survey of contemporary Hong Kong cinema, including introduction to major movements (i.e., the Hong Kong New Wave), genres (martial arts, horror, melodrama), and filmmakers. Equal attention will be paid to analysis, film history, and historical/cultural context.
CHIN 175. Chinese Masters
(5) BERRY
Focus on the work of a single contemporary Chinese Writer, artist, or filmmaker, providing an in-depth analysis of his/her body of work. May include Zhang Yimou, Jiz Zhangke, Mo Yan, Wang Anyi, and Hou Hsiao-hsien, among others.
CHIN 176. Chinese Cinema: Nationalism and Globalism
(4) BERRY
Prerequisite: upper division standing or instructor approval
A critical overview of some of the major cinematic trends in Chinese-language film over the past several decades. Works from the PRC, Taiwan and Hong Kong, as well as Chinese cinema will be considered in a global context.
CHIN 180AAZZ. Special Topics in Chinese Studies
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper Division standing
Repeat Comments: Students must take different letter designations to receive credit. Students may not receive credit for the same letter designation more than once
Special topics in Chinese Studies. Course content varies.
CHIN 180CB. Special Topics in Chinese Studies
CHIN 180CC. Special Topics in Chinese Studies
CHIN 180CQ. Special Topics in Chinese Studies
CHIN 180SM. Special Topics in Chinese Studies
CHIN 183A. Chinese Popular Religion
(4) YANG
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing
Course covers a variety of Chinese popular religions from an anthropological perspective. Readings will be ethnographies of modern China, Taiwan, and late imperial histories. Shamanism; Fengshi/geomancy; ancestor and deity worship; millenarianism; popular Christianity; pilgrimage; syncretism with Daoism, Buddhism, Confucianism.
CHIN 183B. Religious Practice and the State in China
(4) YANG
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Religious Studies 183B.
Historical and anthropological approaches to the interaction between religious practice and state forces, with emphasis on popular religion and the decline and revival of religion in Chinese modernity.
CHIN 184A. History of China
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: History 2A or 2B or 2C or 80, or EACS 80, or upper-division standing.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as History 184A. Not open for credit to students who have completed Chinese 186A or History 186A.
History of China. Ancient China to 589 CE.
CHIN 184B. History of China
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: History 2A or 2B or 2C or 80, or EACS 80, or upper-division standing.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as History 184B. Not open for credit to students who have completed Chinese 186B or History 186B.
History of China. Sixth to seventeenth centuries.
CHIN 185A. Qing Empire
(4) ZHENG
Prerequisite: A prior course in History or upper-division standing.
The Qing period saw the doubling of China's territory, the enormous population growth, and the many encounters with the West. We will examine the politics, cultures, social norms, and different peoples, with a focus on the problem of modernization
CHIN 185B. Modern China (since 1911)
(4) ZHENG
Prerequisite: Any lower-division course in History or upper-division standing.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as History 185B.
The fall of the dynastic system, the revolution against traditional values, the rise of the Nationalist Party, the challenge from the Communists, the founding of the People's Republic, and the Post-Mao reform, with a focus on the theme of revolution.
CHIN 185CQ. Reading Seminar on the Chinese Cultural Revolution (1966-1976)
(4) ZHENG
Prerequisite: History 2C or 80 or 184A or 184B or 185A or 185B or EACS 4A or EACS 4B or Chin 184A or Chin 184B or Chin 185A or Chin 185B
Enrollment Comments: Misc: May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 8 units.
No understanding of contemporary China is possible without understanding the ramifications of the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution. This course seeks to consider the tumultuous episode as a field of historical research and conceptual inquiry. We create this class together.
CHIN 185CR. Reading Seminar on the Chinese Cultural Revolution (1966- 1976)
(4) ZHENG
Prerequisite: CHINESE 185A-B
An understanding of contemporary China is not possible without understanding the ramifications of the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution (1966-1976). We will examine the nature of China's Cultural Revolution, its beginning and ending, and how ordinary Chinese people experienced this tumultuous episode in history.
CHIN 197. Senior Honors Project
(4-8) STAFF
Prerequisite: Open to senior majors only; consent of instructor.
Enrollment Comments: Students must have a 3.0 overall grade-point average and a 3.5 grade-point average in the major.
An independent study course (1 to 3 quarters) directed by a faculty member with a carefully chosen topic and bibliography which will result in a documented project or a senior thesis.
CHIN 198. Readings in Chinese
(1-4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; completion of 2 upper-division courses in Chinese.
Enrollment Comments: Students must have a minimum 3.0 GPA for the preceding three quarters and are limited to 5 units per quarter and 30 units total in all 98/99/198/199/199AA-ZZ courses combined. May be repeated up to 12 units.
Readings in Chinese.
CHIN 199. Independent Studies in Chinese
(1-5) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; completion of 2 upper-division courses in Chinese major; Minimum major GPA of 3.5 or higher
Enrollment Comments: Students must have a 3.0 cumulative GPA for the preceding 3 quarters and are limited to 5 units per quarter and 30 units total in all 98/99/198/199/199AA-ZZ courses combined.
Independent studies in Chinese. Individual investigations in literary fields.
Collapse Courses Graduate 
CHIN 201. Readings in Selected Texts
(2-4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Ability to read Chinese at graduate level; consent of instructor.
Enrollment Comments: Normally graduate status is required.
Course will center on readings of Chinese texts; type and period to depend on needs of students and wishes of instructor. Research methods to be taught as appropriate.
CHIN 204. The Buddhist Influence on Chinese Language and Culture
(4) YU
Prerequisite: Graduate student level
Recommended Preparation: Either CHIN 101A, or CHIN 101B, or CHIN 127A, or CHIN 127B, or CHIN 127C
Enrollment Comments: Concurrently offered with CHIN 104.
Exploratory study of non-Chinese influences on Chinese language and culture as demonstrated by the language of Buddhist sutras translated into Chinese.
CHIN 210. Research Seminar in Taiwan Studies
(4) TU
Research seminar on major issues in Taiwan studies with introduction to bibliographies, reference works, and research methodologies. Under the guidance of a faculty member, students will undertake independent research and work on a research project of their own.
CHIN 211. Bibliography and Research Methodology
(4) LI, X
Prerequisite: One year of classical Chinese.
Introduction to the bibliography, reference works, and methodologies of sinological research.
CHIN 225. A History of Chinese Realisms
(4) COREY BYRNES
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing or permission of the instructor
Recommended Preparation: Graduate Standing or permission of the instructor
This graduate seminar offers an introduction to the main sources and discourses of realism - in literature, visual culture and film - from the late Qing Dynasty through to the present day.
CHIN 231. Imagining Atrocity in Modern Chinese Literature and Film
(4) BERRY
Prerequisite: Open to graduate students and advanced undergraduates with the instructor'spermission. All students should have reading proficiency in Chinese.
An examination of how atrocity and mass violence have been revisited, reimagined, and reconstructed by modern and contemporary writers and filmakers. Major incidents to be considered include the Nanjing Masacre, the February 28, 1947 incident in Taipei, Taiwan, and the Cultural Revolution.
CHIN 238A. Special Topics in Taiwan Studies - Humanities
(4) STAFF
Enrollment Comments: Concurrently offered with Chin 138A.
Repeat Comments: May be repeated for credit in the major to a maximum of 8 units providing topics are different.
Special topics in Taiwan studies with respect to literature, history, and culture from the period of Japanese rules (1895-1945) to the present, including modernity, national identity, intellectual movements, and popular culture. Topics and readings will vary with instructors.
CHIN 238B. Special Topics in Taiwan Studies - Social Science
(4) STAFF
Enrollment Comments: Concurrently offered with CHIN 138B.
Repeat Comments: May be repeated for credit in the major to a maximum of 8 units providing topics are different.
Special topics in Taiwan Studies with respect to historical, economic, political, cultural, and social changes in Taiwan from the period of Japanese rule (1895-1945) to the present. Topics and readings will vary with instructors.
CHIN 241. Issues in Contemporary Chinese Society
(4) YANG
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
Survey of major issues in study of contemporary China. Topics include: gender and the state, nationalism, "guanxi," media, globalization, relgion, and urban and rural cultures.
CHIN 242. Anthropology of China
(4) YANG
This course showcases the anthropological approach to the study of China: fieldwork and ethnography, culture and social history, critical theory. Topics include: state power, gender and sexuality, media, identity and selfhood, urban culture, capitalist relations and class, religiosity.
CHIN 245. Gender and Expression in Pre-Modern Chinese Literature
(4) LI
Repeat Comments: Topics vary; may be repeated for credit.
This graduate seminar examines Chinese literary tradition from the perspective of gender, discussing the gendering of new modes of expression in de/constructing men and women as social categories over the long course of Chinese literary history. Discussion and readings are mainly in English (and Chinese, depending on the backgrounds of students).
CHIN 246. Poetic Culture in Late Imperial China and Beyond
(4) LI
An examination of the role poetry played in both social and individual lives in late imperial China. Relevant practices in later times and in Japan and Korea are also covered. Graduate student paper is required.
CHIN 249. Literati Culture
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Chinese 101A-B or equivalent.
A study of literati (Wen-ren) culture of the middle period concentrating onthe Sung Dynasty. Attention to developments in literature, historiography, the visual arts, and philosophy. Readings (in Chinese and English) from Sudongpo, Li Qingzhao, Sima Guang, and Zhu Xi.
CHIN 249A. Literati Culture
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Chinese 101A-B or equivalent; graduate standing.
Exploration of literati cultures of Tang and Song dynasties. Topical focus varies.
CHIN 249B. Literati Culture
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Chinese 101A-B or equivalent; graduate standing.
Exploration of literati culture of Tang and Song dynastices. Topical focus varies.
CHIN 250. The Language of Vernacular Chinese Literature
(4) YU
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
Early Mandarin as represented in selections from vernacular Chinese fictionof the sixteenth through eighteenth centuries. Primarily concerned with the syntactical and semantic features employed in the reading selections but will also consider the issue of literary expression.
CHIN 251. Chinese Language Pedagogy
(4) YU
Introduces students to currrent issues in Chinese language instruction and trains them to become full-fledged Chinese language specialists. Includes an introduction to Chinese linguistics and course-related designs involved in language teaching.
CHIN 252. Pedagogical Chinese Grammar
(4) YU
Recommended Preparation: Chinese 127C
Provides an overview of Chinese grammar and focuses on topics relevant to the CFL teacher. It also analyses inter-language errors in the Chinese learners. Graduate students should apply a theoretical edge to syntactic phenomena in presentations and papers.
CHIN 253. Introduction to Historical Chinese Syntax
(4) YU
Recommended Preparation: Chinese 101C or equivalent, Linguistics 108 and 109
Aims to provide students with opportunities to explore and examine the mechanisms and the motivations of syntactic change in Chinese in 3rd c BC- 21st century. Readings and paper requirements for graduate students are more extensive.
CHIN 255. The Role of Language Contact in the History of Chinese Language
(4) YU
Recommended Preparation: Chinese 253.
A survey of language contact types and mechanisms and its impact on Chinese language development from the third century to present time.
CHIN 260. Readings in Taoism
(4) STEAVU
Recommended Preparation: One year of formal study of classical Chinese.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as RG ST 260.
Repeat Comments: Course content variable; may be repeated for credit.
Selected readings from important Taoist texts. Depending on the year, primary sources will be read in original Chinese or in translation.
CHIN 262. Science and Medicine in Medieval China
(4) STEAVU
Prerequisite: Basic Classical Chinese or Kanbun required.
This course undertakes a critical history of science and medicine in premodern China, focusing primarily on their role as instigators of interchange between Buddhism, Daoism, and various intellectual currents.
CHIN 266F. Readings in Chinese Buddhism
(4) STEAVU
Recommended Preparation: One year of formal study of classical Chinese.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as RG ST 266F.
Repeat Comments: Course content variable; may be repeated for credit.
Selected readings in important Buddhist texts which were either originally written in Chinese or translated into that language. Depending on the year, primary sources will be read in original Chinese or in translation.
CHIN 270. New Taiwan Cinema
(4) BERRY
Critical survey of the new Taiwan cinema (1982-86) movement and its representative filmmakers Edward Yang and Hou Hsiao-Hsien. Emphasis on cinema history, formal film analysis, and introduction to the major thematic concerns of Taiwan film and media culture.
CHIN 274. Hong Kong Cinema
(4) BERRY
Enrollment Comments: Concurrent with CHIN 174. Graduate students will have extended meeting times, additional readings, and a longer seminar paper.
Repeat Comments: Topics vary; may be repeated for credit.
Critical survey of contemporary Hong Kong cinema, including introduction to major movements (i.e. the Hong Kong New Wave), genres (martial arts, horror, melodrama), and filmmakers. Equal attention will be paid to analysis, film, history, and historical/cultural context.
CHIN 275. Chinese Masters
(4) BERRY
Enrollment Comments: Concurrent with CHIN 175. Graduate students will have extended meeting times, additional readings, and a longer seminar paper.
Repeat Comments: Topics vary; may be repeated for credit.
Focus on the work of a single contemporary Chinese writer, artist, or filmmakers, providing an in-depth analysis of his/her body of work. May include Zhang Yimou, Jia Zhangke, Mo Yan, Wang Anyi, and Hou Hsiao-hsien, among others.
CHIN 285CR. Reading Seminar on the Chinese Cultural Revolution (1966-1976)
(4) ZHENG
Enrollment Comments: Concurrent with CHIN 185CR. Graduate students will be assigned longer papers.
An understanding of contemporary China is not possible without understanding the ramifications of the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution (1966-1976). We will examine the nature of China's Cultural Revolution, its beginning and ending, and how ordinary Chinese people experienced this tumultuous episode in history.
CHIN 292AAZZ. Special Topics
(4) STAFF
Repeat Comments: Topics vary; may be repeated for credit.
Seminar in special areas of interest in Chinese cultural studies. Specific course titles and topics to be announced by the department each quarter offered. Course content will vary.
CHIN 292TR. US-China Trade Relations
CHIN 501. Apprentice Teaching
(2-4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor. Employment in this department teaching assistant or linguistic informant.
Enrollment Comments: These units do not count toward the graduate degree.
Apprentice teaching. This course consists of supervised teaching practice in Chinese language.
CHIN 596. Directed Reading and Research
(2-4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
Enrollment Comments: Letter grade; minimum of two units per quarter.
Individual tutorial. A written proposal for each tutorial must be approved by department chair and filed with graduate division.
CHIN 597. Preparation for Comprehensive Examinations
(1-6) STAFF
Prerequisite: Consent of graduate adviser.
Enrollment Comments: No unit credit allowed toward degree.
Study for master's comprehensive examinations and Ph.D examinations.
CHIN 598. Master's Thesis Research and Preparation
(1-6) STAFF
Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.
Enrollment Comments: Maximum of 12 units total. No unit credit allowed toward master's degree.
Instructor should be chair of the student's thesis committee.
CHIN 599. Ph.D. Dissertation Preparation
(1-12) STAFF
Repeat Comments: May be repeated as necessary for completion of dissertation.
Terminal preparation of the dissertation.

 
East Asian Cultural Studies
 (
Show All
 | 
Hide All
)
Collapse Courses Lower Division 
EACS 3. Introduction to Asian Religious Traditions
(4) STAFF
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Religious Studies 3.
An introduction to the basic texts, institutions, and practices of the religious traditions of South Asia and East Asia.
EACS 4A. East Asian Traditions: Pre-modern
(4) STAFF
An introduction to the social structures, institutions, systems of thought and belief, and the arts and entertainments of China and Japan during the pre-modern period.
EACS 4B. East Asian Traditions: Modern
(4) STAFF
An introduction to the study of China and Japan in modern times, including the process of modernization, intellectual and political movements, national identity, literature and the arts, and popular culture.
EACS 5. Introduction to Buddhism
(4) STAFF
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Religious Studies 4.
The historical and cross-cultural exploration of Buddhism through the examination of basic texts, institutions, and practices of diverse Buddhist traditions.
EACS 7. Asian Values
(4) FRUHSTUCK, RAMBELLI
Prerequisite: none
"Asian values" are evoked when policies are made, human rights are globally discussed, or individuals explain their behavior. We examine them from philosophical, religious, social, and political perspectives and propose alternative, lesser known values developed in Asia over centuries.
EACS 14. Environment and Power in Japan
(4) LEWALLEN
What is the relationship between forms of power and environmental health in Japan? How do traditional values and practices influence contemporary ecologies? Traces the history of environmentalism and applies social science theories to assess contemporary environmental issues in Japan.
EACS 20. Nature: East Asian Views
(4) RAMBELLI
An introduction to the ways in which Chinese and Japanese cultures have conceptualized nature and humankind's place in it.
EACS 21. Zen Buddhism
(4) STAFF
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Religious Studies 21.
An introduction to the history and texts of the major lineages of Ch`an Buddhism in China and Zen Buddhism in Japan.
EACS 23. Introduction to Chinese Buddhism
(4) STEAVU
Prerequisite: none
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Religious Studies 23
Provides a basic introduction to the key concepts, chief figures, principal schools, and major developments of Buddhism from its arrival in China two thousand years ago to the present day.
EACS 30. Tourism in East Asia
(4) PAI
Surveys the historical, cultural, and economic significance of tourists destinations in South Korea, China, and Japan. Using case studies ranging from temples, museums, monuments and theme parks, course analyzes how selected "images/myths" of East Asia have been invented, manipulated, and propagated in the commodification of culture and heritage.
EACS 40. Gender and Sexuality in Modern Asia
(4) YANG
Prerequisite: none
Examines how modern social institutions have constructed and transformed gender and sexuality in China, Japan, Korea, India, and other Asian societies. Topics: marriage and kinship, capitalism, nationalism, modern state, third genders, commercialization of sex, public sphere and mass media.
EACS 47. Introduction to Taoism
(4) STEAVU
Prerequisite: none
A study of the classical sources of Taoism, followed by a consideration of the varieties of religious practice which developed from those sources.
EACS 74. The Western Discovery of Buddhism
(4) RAMBELLI
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Religious Studies 74
Survey of the "discovery" and the study of Buddhism by Westerners from antiquity to the present, with special emphasis on the modern era. We will explore the mutual impact of Buddhism and Western modern culture.
EACS 80. East Asian Civilization
(4) ROBERTS, BARBIERI-LOW
Enrollment Comments: Same course as History 80.
A basic introduction to the history of East Asia focusing on the emergence and evolution of Chinese civilization and its impact upon the distinctive indigenous cultures of Japan, Korea, and Vietnam.
EACS 85. Modern China: An Introduction
(4) ZHENG
Prerequisite: No prerequisites
Enrollment Comments: Open to non-majors.
The extraordinary changes that we are witnessing in today’s China are the focus of fascination, anxiety, and confusion— sometimes all at once — both inside and outside of China. Though seemingly sudden, these changes are actually deeply rooted in Chinese history. This course is designed for students who are interested in understanding the connections between contemporary China and the recent Chinese past.
EACS 99. Independent Study in Asian Studies
(1-5) STAFF
Prerequisite: minimum 3.0 cumulative GPA
Enrollment Comments: Students must have a cumulative 3.0 for the proceeding 1 quarter(s). Students must have a minimum 3.0 GPA. Limited to 5 units per quarter and 30 units total in all 98/99/198/199/199AA-ZZ courses combined.
Introduction to independent research in Asian Studies. Topic and content are decided by the supervising Professor in the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultural Studies.
EACS 99RA. Independent Research Assistance on Asia
(1-4) STAFF
Prerequisite: minimum 3.0 cumulative GPA
Enrollment Comments: Students must have a cumulative 3.0 for the proceeding 1 quarter(s). Students must have a minimum 3.0 GPA. Limited to 5 units per quarter and 30 units total in all 98/99/198/199/199AA-ZZ courses combined.
Research details are decided by the supervising Professor in the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultural Studies.
Collapse Courses Upper Division 
EACS 103A. Anthropology of China
(4) YANG
Prerequisite: upper division standing or instructor approval
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Anthropology 103A.
This course adopts an anthropological approach to contemporary China through ethnographic research. Topics include: Maoist society, rural life, migrant workers, gender and sexuality, media culture, youth culture, the urban work unit, from Maoist class-status system to capitalist class structure.
EACS 103B. Anthropology of Japan
(4) LEWALLEN
Prerequisite: upper division standing or instructor approval
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Anthropology 103B.
This course examines Japan as depicted in contemporary ethnography. We consider how Japan has been imagined as a distinct culture by exploring gender, religion, family structures, the education system, the environment, management of difference, globalization and domestication, immigration, and modernization.
EACS 103C. Anthropology of Contemporary Korea
(4) PAI
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing or instructor approval
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Anthropology 103C. Students who have completed KOR 82 should not enroll in EACS/ANTH 103C.
This course is an introduction to contemporary Korea covering the major societal transformations since the Korean War. Topics include nationalism, the creation of national symbols and racial identity, family, marriage, consumption, television dramas, globalization, tourism, and new Korean Wave.
EACS 109A. Western Representations of Asia
(4) STEAVU
Prerequisite: Upper division standing
Ponders the emergence of religion as a category of analysis in light of the rise of orientalist discourse. Pre- and Post- enlightenment accounts of the European encounter with "Asia" will be examined against more recent critical perspectives.
EACS 130. Tourism in East Asia
(4) PAI
Investigates historical, cultural, and commercial agendas of heritage sites in South Korea, China, and Japan. Using case studies of ancient cities, landmarks, religions, and festivals, it analyzes the intertwined relationship between the heritage industry, preservation goals, developmental agendas, and the promotion of “authentic” experience and “national” landscapes.
EACS 134A. Buddhist Art
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Not open to freshmen.
Recommended Preparation: Art History 6DS or 6DW.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Art History 134A.
A survey of selected forms of Indian, Chinese, and Japanese Buddhist art. Emphasis on Buddhist sculpture and Zen painting. Exploration of the correlation of religious values and art, transformation and adaptation of artistic traditions from one culture to another.
EACS 140. Indigenous Movements in Asia
(4) LEWALLEN
Prerequisite: Upper Division Standing
Enrollment Comments: Not open to students who have completed Japan 166. Same course as ANTH 191.
Examines the emergence of indigenous peoples as a new kind of political community in Asia. Reading across ethnographic, historical, and politic-legal perspectives, we will explore the material and symbolic benefits of claiming to be indigenous in non-western contexts.
EACS 141. Environmental Justice in Asia
(4) LEWALLEN
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Applies environmental justice, a tool for addressing social and ethnic/racial inequality in environmental conditions, to analysis of Asia. Contrasts mainstream environmental and sustainability models with the justice-based approach to analyze how local communities devise solutions for environmental crises.
EACS 147T. Introduction to Taoism
(4) STEAVU
Prerequisite: Upper Division Only
A study of the classical sources of Taoism, followed by a consideration of the varieties of religious practice which developed from those sources.
EACS 150. Gender and Sexuality in Asian Modernities
(4) YANG
Prerequisite: Upper division standing or prior approval of the instructor
Transformations in gender and sexuality in modern China, Korea, India, Taiwan, Thailand, Singapore, and Japan. Topics include: family and kinship; role of the state; mass media; Asian nationalisms; gendered division of labor; queer cultures; and the commercialization of sex.
EACS 152. Ethnographic Research Methods: Ethics and Engagement
(4) LEWALLEN
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing
Interrogation of ethnographic research, its development and its ethical implications. Weighing approaches such as participatory action research, engaged and collaborative research, and decolonized methodologies. Students will develop projects based on a critical reading of these models.
EACS 163C. Doctors and Diviners: Science, Medicine, and Religion in Premodern China
(4) STEAVU
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing
This course undertakes a critical history of science and medicine in premodern China, focusing primarily on their role as instigators of interchange between Buddhism, Daoism, and various intellectual currents.
EACS 164B. Buddhist Traditions in East Asia
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: upper division standing
Recommended Preparation: background in Indian Buddhism.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Religious Studies 164B.
A consideration of the Buddhist tradition and its evolution in China, with emphasis on the changes which Buddhism underwent in its encounter with Chinese traditions and historical circumstances.
EACS 165. East Asian Buddhist Poetry
(4) MAZANEC
Prerequisite: Upper Division Standing
Recommended Preparation: None
Introduces Buddhist poetry of China, Japan, and Korea. Emphasizes the diversity of literary encounters with the teachings and practices of Buddhism. Topics include Hanshan, Basho, Zen koans, Gary Snyder, and monastery cats.
EACS 171. Buddhism and Local Cults in Asia
(4) RAMBELLI
Prerequisite: One lower division or upper division course on Buddhism, or prior approval of the instructor
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Religious Studies 171.
This course examines the multiple ways in which various Buddhist traditions have interacted with "local" cults in various parts of Asia (including China, Tibet, Japan, Burma, and Thailand). We will discuss issues of localization and translocalization as important religious phenomena.
EACS 176. Buddhist Political Thought and Institutions
(4) RAMBELLI
Prerequisite: upper division standing or instructor approval
Enrollment Comments: Same course as RG ST 176.
Buddhist political theories and practices in various Asian countries from antiquity to the present, with special emphasis on ideas of kinship and republicanism, state-formation process, cultural identity, and the interactions with other religions.
EACS 179. Visual Culture of Buddhism
(4) RAMBELLI
Prerequisite: Upper division standing or instructor approval
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Religious Studies 179.
This course explores the rich world of Buddhist visual culture, ranging from meditation to addressing the use of painted images in public performances. It focuses on sacred images, their rituals, and theories of representation behind their creation and use.
EACS 180. Visualizing Asia: Photography, Travel and Destination Marketing
(4) PAI
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.
Surveys the historical, artistic and commercial origins of travel media on Asia. Using case studies of iconic landmarks, it traces the impact of visual culture in the making and marketing of "must- see" destinations in China, Japan and Korea.
EACS 181AAZZ. Special Topics in East Asian Studies
(4) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper Division Standing
Special topics in East Asian Studies. Course content varies.
EACS 181DD. Special Topics in East Asian Studies
EACS 181EE. Special Topics in East Asian Studies
EACS 181TC. Special Topics in East Asian Studies
EACS 186. The Invention of Tradition in Contemporary East Asia
(4) PAI
Analyzes the instructional history, political, and disciplinary backgrounds in the construction of contemporary "Asian" ethnic and cultural identity. Topics include popular media, national monuments, and artistic performance including musicals, theater, drama, film, and tourist sites.
EACS 197. Senior Honors Project
(1-5) STAFF
Prerequisite: Open to EACS seniors only and prior approval of instructor
Enrollment Comments: Students must have a 3.0 overall GPA and a 3.5 GPA in the major.
An independent study project (1-2 quarters) directed by a faculty member with a carefully chosen topic and bibliography which will result in a documented project or a senior thesis.
EACS 199. Independent Study in Asian Studies
(1-5) STAFF
Prerequisite: Upper division standing; completion of 2 upper division EACS courses; at least one of those two courses taken with the instructor for EACS 199; GPA for those two courses 3.5 or higher.
Enrollment Comments: Students must have 3.0 GPA overall. Limit of 5 units/quarter and 30 unitsoverall of any independent studies.
Independent Study under the supervision of a faculty member.
Collapse Courses Graduate 
EACS 200AS. Great Books in East Asian History
(4) ZHENG
A general examination preparation course, designed to introduce the key historiography of East Asian History. Students read a series of monographs and scholarly articles, ranging from ancient to contemporary time. Readings surround themes of modernity, power, political history; social history; micro- history; legal history; gender history; oral history; and close textual reading and discursive analysis.
EACS 200XZ. Historical Literature: Asia
(4) ZHENG
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit.
A reading course in a general area of history, specifically designed to prepare M.A. candidates for their comprehensive examination fields, but also appropriate for Ph.D. students seeking broad preparation. Introduces the student to the sources, historiography, and general literature of the field in question.
EACS 212. Canon Formation, Periodization, and Disciplinarity in East Asian Studies
(4) STAFF
An analysis of classical, medieval, and modern sets of "canons" including myth historiography, literature and the arts, with a view to question the way they were mutually distinguished (disciplinary) and changed through time (periodization) recognizing both internal conceptions and external influences.
EACS 215. Topics in East Asian Cultural Studies
(4) STAFF
As a forum for the practice of discussion, critique, and writing, this seminar takes up broad topics within the study of East Asian cultures in an interdisciplinary manner.
EACS 218. The Art and Theory of Translation
(4) STAFF
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 8 units.
An introduction to the literature of translation studies and practice in translation from principally, Chinese and Japanese. Students are encouraged to explore the extent to which translation theory can be usefully (artfully?) applied to translations in progress.
EACS 241. Environmental Justice in Asia
(4) LEWALLEN
Applies environmental justice, a tool for addressing social and ethnic/racial inequality in environmental conditions, to analysis of Asia. Contrasts mainstream environmental and sustainability models with the justice-based approach to analyze how local communities devise solutions for environmental crises.
EACS 252. Ethnographic Research Methods: Ethics and Engagement
(4) LEWALLEN
Enrollment Comments: Concurrently offered with EACS 152. Concurrent with EACS 152. Graduate students will write a longer final research paper, hold additional meetings with the instructor, be required to go through the Human Subjects Review process for their research project, and give oral presentation of their research findings (15 minutes) during course meeting times.
Repeat Comments: Topics vary; may be repeated for credit.
Interrogation of ethnographic research, its development and its ethical implications. Weighing approaches such as participatory action research, engaged and collaborative research, and decolonized methodologies, students will develop projects based on a critical reading of these models.
EACS 257. Seminar in Buddhist Studies
(4) STAFF
Enrollment Comments: May be repeated for credit.
Historical, philosophical, methodological, and/or bibliographical analysis of different aspects of Buddhism or of selected areas in the study of Buddhism.
EACS 260. Methods, Politics, and Epistemology: Doing Ethnography in Asia
(4) LEWALLEN
Prerequisite: None
This seminar aims to engage the practice of ethnography as a critically reflective exercise. The course introduces key issues in the genealogy, practice, epistemology, and the politics of ethnography as a research method with focus on research in Asian contexts. Target Audience: Graduate students interested in gaining hands-on knowledge of research methodology.
EACS 268. Religion, Modernity, Asia
(4) YANG
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
Enrollment Comments: Same course as RG ST 268.
Explores how modernity transformed ritualized Asian monarchical states into new nation-states. Premodern ritual states; colonialism and postcolonialism; traditional culture, modernism, nationalism; religious civil societies; secularization; changing relations between state and religion; religious globalization. Emphasis on China, but also Japan, India, and other Asian polities.
EACS 271. Buddhism and Local Cults in Asia
(4) RAMBELLI
Enrollment Comments: Concurrent with EACS 171. Graduate students will have additional readings specified in the syllabus and an additional research paper.
This course examines the multiple ways in which various Buddhist traditions have interacted with "local" cults in various parts of Asia (including China, Tibet, Japan, Burma, and Thailand). We will discuss issues of localization and translocalization as important religious phenomena.
EACS 276. Buddhist Political Thought and Institutions
(4) RAMBELLI
Enrollment Comments: Concurrent with EACS 176. Graduate students will have additional readings specified in the syllabus and an additional research paper.
Buddhist political theories and practices in various Asian countries from antiquity to the present, with special emphasis on ideas of kingship and republicanism, state-formation process, cultural identity, and the interactions with other religions.
EACS 278. Buddhist Geography
(4) RAMBELLI
Enrollment Comments: Same course as RG ST 278.
This course analyzes Buddhist ideas about the external world: the structure of the universe, world geography and Buddhist world maps, geopolitical considerations (in particular, the relations between regional forms of Buddhism and India), and local constructs of sacred space.
EACS 279. Visual Culture of Buddhism
(4) RAMBELLI
Enrollment Comments: Concurrent with EACS 179. Graduate students will have additional readings specified in the syllabus and an additional research paper.
This course explores the rich world of Buddhist visual culture, ranging from meditation to addressing the use of painted images in public performances. It focuses on sacred images, their rituals, and theories of representation behind their creation and use.
EACS 292AAZZ. Special Topics
(4) STAFF
Repeat Comments: Topics vary; may be repeated for credit.
Seminar in special areas of interest in East Asian cultural studies. Specific course titles and topics to be announced by the department each quarter offered. Course content will vary.
EACS 292EJ. Special Topics
EACS 292LP. Special Topics
EACS 596. Directed Reading and Research
(2-4) STAFF
Enrollment Comments: Misc: Letter grade; minimum of two units per quarter.
Repeat Comments: May be repeated for credit.
Individual tutorial.
EACS 597. Preparation for Comprehensive/Qualifying Examinations
(1-6) STAFF
Enrollment Comments: No unit credit allowed toward degree.
Repeat Comments: May be repeated for credit.
Preparation for MA comprehensive examinations and/or PhD qualifying examinations.
EACS 598. Master's Thesis Research and Preparation
(1-6) STAFF
Enrollment Comments: Maximum of 12 units total. No unit credit allowed toward master's degree.
Repeat Comments: May be repeated for credit.
Research, preparation, and writing of the master's thesis.
EACS 599. Ph.D. Dissertation Preparation
(1-12) STAFF
Repeat Comments: May be repeated as necessary for completion of dissertation.
Terminal preparation of the dissertation.

 
Japanese
 (
Show All
 | 
Hide All
)
Collapse Courses Lower Division 
JAPAN 1. First-Year Japanese I
(5) STAFF
An introduction to modern Japanese. Students will develop basic communicative skills based on the fundamentals of grammar, vocabulary, and conversational expressions. Emphasis on both oral- aural proficiency andwriting-reading skills. Introduction to Hiragana and Katakana syllabaries, and Kanji.
JAPAN 2. First-Year Japanese II
(5) STAFF
Prerequisite: Japanese 1 with grade C or better, or equivalent.
Continuation of Japanese 1.
JAPAN 3. First-Year Japanese III
(5) STAFF
Prerequisite: Japanese 2 with grade C or better, or equivalent
Continuation of Japanese 2.
JAPAN 4. Second-Year Japanese
(5) STAFF
Prerequisite: Japanese 3 with grade C or better, or equivalent
Enrollment Comments: No credit can be earned if more advanced credit in the language has alreadybeen awarded.
Continuation of Japanese 3. Course emphasizes the further development of both oral-aural proficiency and reading-writing skills with an intensive review of basic grammar as well as an introduction to more advanced grammar, vocabulary, and Kanji.
JAPAN 5. Second-Year Japanese
(5) STAFF
Prerequisite: Japanese 4 with grade C or better, or equivalent
Enrollment Comments: No credit can be earned if more advanced credit in the language has alreadybeen awarded.
Continuation of Japanese 4.
JAPAN 6. Second-Year Japanese
(5) STAFF
Prerequisite: Japanese 5 with grade C or better, or equivalent
Enrollment Comments: No credit can be earned if more advanced credit in the language has alreadybeen awarded.
Continuation of Japanese 5.
JAPAN 17. Imagining the Samurai
(4) FLEMING
Prerequisite: None.
A critical exploration of the image and myth of the samurai, Japan's hereditary warrior class, as constructed in Japanese literature, film, drama and art.
JAPAN 25. Violence and the Japanese State
(4) FRUHSTUCK
Enrollment Comments: Same course as History 25 and Japanese 25.
Examines historiographically and sociologically the Japanese State's various engagements in violent acts during war and peace times.
JAPAN 63. Sociology of Japan
(4) FRUHSTUCK
Sociological macro- and micro-analysis of Japanese society in the twentieth century.
JAPAN 70. Japan in Film
(4) NATHAN
Prerequisite: None.
Recommended Preparation: None
Students will screen and then write about films by Japanese directors between 1945 and 1985. Students will learn how to evaluate stylistic components of film narrative. The emphasis will be on viewing the films as pictorial representations (and interpretations) of aspects of Japanese society, political, social, cultural.
JAPAN 73. Introduction to Japanese Religion: Texts, Concepts, and Representations
(4) RAMBELLI
Enrollment Comments: Same course as Religious Studies 73.
A survey of the main authors, themes, and styles of the Japanese religious and philosophical traditions through readings from and analysis of some significant and influential original texts in English translation.
JAPAN 80. Masterpieces of Japanese Literature
(4) SALTZMAN-LI
Prerequisite: none
Examines a selection of works from Japanese literature, with the goal of understanding the major genres and their development over time. The cultural roles of literature, as well as criteria for critical evaluation, are also addressed.
JAPAN 99. Independent Study in Japanese